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Your Starter Guide to Portuguese Verbs

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Oh, verbs. Crucially important for communication in any language, they can sometimes be a bit of a pain. There are so many of them, regular and irregular, that it’s easy to get lost. But worry not: we’re here to help you every step of the way! In no time, you’ll be best friends with Portuguese verbs. 

It’s definitely important to learn the most-used verbs early on in your journey to mastering a second language. The reason for this is simple: verbs provide key information in a sentence, indicating an action. Of course, you’ll also need to know the most popular adjectives and adverbs in Portuguese! This way, you’ll have all the tools you need to understand sentences and make your own.

The cool thing about learning the most common verbs in Portuguese is that you’ll start recognizing them when listening or reading. This is one of the best ways to understand the context of what’s being said, even if you don’t understand all the words in a sentence. And with just a few Portuguese verbs, you’ll be able to communicate much more.

Better yet, since in Portuguese it’s common to reply with a single verb instead of a whole sentence, you’ll really get the most bang for your buck!
If you’re ready to get familiarized with Portuguese irregular and regular verbs, great! We’ll make this as easy as possible for you! First, let’s have a quick look at the main characteristics of Portuguese verb conjugation. Then, we’ll explore 100 must-know Portuguese verbs that will really help you step up your language game.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Useful Verbs in Portuguese Table of Contents
  1. The Basics You Need to Know
  2. The Finest Exemplars of Portuguese Verbs
  3. Continue Learning More Portuguese with PortuguesePod101

1. The Basics You Need to Know

Top verbs

1 – Verb Endings: Why They Matter

As in some other languages, Portuguese has three main verb groups, characterized by their different endings. In this case, the verb endings are  -AR, -ER, and -IR. Take the three verbs below as examples:

-AR-ER-IR
Andar (“To walk”)Comer (“To eat”)Abrir (“To open”)

There are also verbs that end in -OR, but since those are always irregular verbs, we don’t group them. 

It can be helpful to keep those endings in mind, because regular verbs in each group are conjugated in the same way. The stem of the verbs remain the same throughout the different conjugations, and the endings are predictable. 

In other words, by learning the Portuguese verb conjugation for just a few verbs in each group, you’ll already have a blueprint of how to deal with any other regular verb you come across! 
To see how regular verbs in the present tense behave, look at this Portuguese conjugation chart:

-AR verbs-ER verbs-IR verbs
EuStem + oAndoStem + oComoStem + oAbro
“I walk”“I eat”“I open”
TuStem + asAndasStem + esComesStem + esAbres
“You walk”“You eat”“You open”
Você/Ele/ElaStem + aAndaStem + eComeStem + eAbre
“You walk,” using você.
“He/She walks”
“You eat,” using você.
“He/She eats”
“You open,” using você.
“He/She opens”
NósStem + amosAndamosStem + emosComemosStem + imosAbrimos
“We walk”“We eat”“We open”
VósStem + aisAndaisStem + eisComeisStem + isAbris
“You walk”“You eat”“You open”
Vocês/Eles/ElasStem + amAndamStem + emComemStem + emAbrem
“They walk”“They eat”“They open”

It is indeed a happy moment when we encounter regular verbs. 

Group of people running on track field

2 – Making the Most of the Verbs 

An interesting thing about verbs is that they go beyond expressing an action. The verb conjugation in Portuguese tells you much more than what happened; it also tells you who is performing the action and/or the moment in time when that action happens. In some cases, it’s not even necessary to use the subject in the sentence, since the verb itself already implies the subject. 

Let’s look at an example to see if it makes sense.

  • Acordei agora. 

“I woke up now.”

In the example, we only have the verb acordei and the adverb agora (“now”). There’s no need to use the subject eu (“I”), because the verb in itself contains the information about who did the action (who woke up). In this example, the verb alone doesn’t tell us when the action took place, which is why we see the adverb agora

Let’s look at another example, this time an interaction between two people:

  • Acordou agora? 

“Did you wake up now?”

Acordei. 

“I did.”

This is a perfect example of how you can use a single verb to answer a question. So rejoice! Once you learn the rules for Portuguese verb conjugation and how verbs change depending on the person and time, your communication potential will increase exponentially!

3 – When Verbs Go Together

Now another word about Portuguese verb tenses.

In some cases, you’ll see more than one verb being used in a sentence. This happens in compound tenses. In Portuguese, we have simple tenses and compound tenses, similar to what happens in English. When only one verb expresses the action, we’re dealing with a simple tense, while compound tenses use two verbs to express the action.

For example, you can say:

  • Eu fiz a prova de matemática. 

“I took the math test.”

In the simple tense, only one verb expresses the action. Now, if you say:

  • Eu estava fazendo a prova de matemática quando… 

“I was taking the math test when…”

We have a compound tense, where the main verb needs an auxiliary verb to indicate the action. Like in the example above, it’s very common to use compound tenses when talking about getting to places

In this article, we won’t go into the details of Portuguese verb conjugation, but you will be able to recognize some of those auxiliary verbs after checking out our Portuguese verbs list.

Sometimes the verbs like to partner up.

4 – Where Does the Verb Go?

Lastly, something that’s very helpful is becoming familiarized with the basic sentence structure in Portuguese. This is very straightforward, since it’s similar to the English sentence structure.

SentenceEu andei com ele.“I walked with him.”
SubjectEu“I”
Verbandei“walked”
Objectcom ele“with him”

However, keep in mind that Portuguese is a language full of exceptions, so don’t rule out other possibilities.

I know, I know, that was a lot. Verbs can be intimidating because they’re in pretty much every sentence we read, write, or speak. But this is also a blessing in disguise since you’ll have plenty of opportunities to practice. 

Remember that learning a foreign language is not a sprint, so let’s first work on becoming familiar with the most common Portuguese verbs. To know how to pronounce the verbs we’ll see, check out this handy video with the Top 25 Portuguese Verbs.

And a final tip: As you set out to learn Portuguese verbs, use your time wisely. When commuting or with free time on your hands, take a look at this article again. Review and reinforce what you learn with some more information about Portuguese verbs. Then, by combining them with adverbs and adjectives you’ve already learned, you can begin creating more sentences. You’ll be ready to go beyond the basic greetings and really start conversing in Portuguese!

2. The Finest Exemplars of Portuguese Verbs

More essential verbs

1 – The Verb “To Be” in Portuguese

The illustrious verb “to be” has to come first in this list of essential Portuguese verbs. After all, it’s one of the first verbs you’ll use when getting to know people. There’s a catch, however. Unlike in English, in Portuguese we have two verbs that translate to “to be.” These are the Portuguese verbs ser and estar.

Think of it in terms of permanence and impermanence:

  • You can be something permanently (or at least for a long time):
    •  You can be a certain nationality or profession.
  • You can be something for a small period of time (temporarily)
    • You can be cold, you can be sunblind, or you can be in school.

1.

Ser
“To be” – permanent
Ele é um homem muito alto.
“He is a very tall man.”

2.

Estar
“To be” – impermanent
Eles estão ansiosos.
“They are anxious.”

Both verbs also act as auxiliary verbs in specific compound tenses. 

Estar is an auxiliary verb in all of the continuous tenses. That means that when you want to say you “were doing” or “are doing” something, estar is the auxiliary verb you will use.

  • Present continuous: Eu estou correndo agora. (“I am running now.”)
  • Past continuous: Você estava lendo uma revista. (“You were reading a magazine.”)

Ser is an auxiliary verb only when a sentence is in the passive voice. In other words, when the action happens to someone, we use the verb ser alongside the main verb.

  • Passive voice: Nós fomos reconhecidos. (“We were recognized.”)

2 – Some Other Auxiliary Verbs

Besides the “to be” verbs, there are some other important Portuguese auxiliary verbs to learn. When they’re acting as helping verbs, they’re used before the action verb. As a result, they add information about possibility or time. 

In the examples below, the first sentence shows the verb acting as the main verb, in the simple tense. The second example shows how it’s used in the compound tense.

3.

Ir 
“To go”
“Will”
Eles estão indo para a praia.
“They are going to the beach.”
Eu vou dormir agora.
“I will sleep now.”

The verb ir is an auxiliary verb in the future tense, indicating the action that will happen. 

In Brazilian Portuguese, it’s very common to see the verb ir being used in the compound future tense instead of the simple future tense. For example, it’s more likely that you’ll hear:

  • Eu vou fazer um bolo. 

than

  • Eu farei um bolo.

Both sentences mean the same thing, but the compound form is more common in colloquial Portuguese. 

You’ll also encounter the verb ir paired with an action verb in the gerund form. This combination expresses a continuous action in the near future.

  • Eu vou dirigindo na frente. 

“I will be driving ahead.”

You can probably tell by the examples above that ir is a highly irregular verb.

4.

Ter 
“To have”
Nós temos dinheiro.
“We have money.”
Eu tenho comido bem.
“I have been eating well.”

Ter is used to form the perfect tenses:

  • Você tem acordado cedo. 

“You have been waking up early.”

  • Você teria acordado cedo se o despertador tivesse funcionado direito. 

“You would have woken up early if the alarm clock had worked properly.”

5.

Haver 
“Can” 
“May”
Há mais de 40 sapatos.
“There are more than 40 shoes.”
Eu haveria perdido.
“I would have lost.”

Haver is a special little verb. It’s used in a variety of ways. But the truth is that, at least in Brazilian Portuguese, it’s becoming less common to use it. 

Haver can mean “there is” or “there are”:

  • Há muita gente aqui. 

“There are a lot of people here.”

Note that the same sentence could have been written with the verb ter:

  • Tem muita gente aqui. 

“There are a lot of people here.”

These two words can be used interchangeably in the context of “there is” and “there are.” They’re also interchangeable in the compound perfect tenses. 

  • Ele havia conseguido. 

“He had succeeded.”

  • Ele tinha conseguido. 

“He had succeeded.”

Although grammatically correct, it’s rarer to see the verb haver used in those cases.

/! But attention! When ter conveys possession, then the verbs can’t be used interchangeably.

6.

Poder 
“Can” 
“May”
“To be able”
 “Might”
Podemos lutar.
“We can fight.”

Eu posso precisar de ajuda hoje a noite.
“I might need help tonight.”

7.

Dever
“Must”
“To have to”
“To owe”
Tu deves continuar.
“You must continue.”

Você me deve uma cerveja.
“You owe me a beer.”
Dever is also a noun in Portuguese. It can mean “duty” or “homework” in the expression dever de casa.
  • Já terminei meu dever de casa. (“I’m done with my homework.”)

There are many other verbs that, in some occasions, act as auxiliary verbs. As long as you know the ones we’ve just looked at, you’ll do very well!

Auxiliary verbs are like the friendly neighbors you can count on.

3 – The Most-Used Action Verbs in Portuguese

Negative verbs

Now that you already know the main auxiliary verbs, let’s continue seeing how to express actions with this Portuguese verbs chart. Remember to also get familiar with how they sound with this vocabulary list of the 50 Most Common Verbs. There are more listening exercises available on PortuguesePod101.

8.

Fazer
“To do”
“To make”
“To have” (when talking about events)
Você já fez seus exercícios hoje?
“Did you already do your exercises today?”

Eu faço o melhor bolo de chocolate.
“I make the best chocolate cake.”

Vamos fazer uma festa esse fim de semana?
“Let’s have a party this weekend?”
In Portuguese, we often use the verb fazer to talk about weather:
  • Fez muito sol. (“It was very sunny.”)

We can also use the verb estar in the same way:
  • Estava muito sol. (“It was very sunny.”)

Lastly, you’re also likely to see both verbs being used, in a compound tense:
  • Estava fazendo muito frio. (“It was very cold.”)

9.

Dizer
“To say”
“To tell”
Nós sempre dizemos isso.
“We always say that.”

10.

Falar
“To speak”
“To talk”
“To tell”
Minha mãe fala inglês.
“My mother speaks English.”

11.

Dar
“To give”
Eles nos deram muito apoio.
“They gave us a lot of support.”

12.

Gostar
“To like”
Ela gostava do mar.
“She liked the sea.”

13.

Amar
“To love”
Eu amo bolo de chocolate!
“I love chocolate cake!”

14.

Ver
“To see”
Vocês veem aquele pássaro?
“Do you see that bird?”

15.

Olhar
“To look”
Quando ele olhou pra mim, eu chorei.
“When he looked at me, I cried.”

16.

Ouvir
“To hear”
Você ouviu o trovão?
“Did you hear the thunder?”

17.

Escutar
“To listen to”
Ele escutou o discurso até o final.
“He listened to the speech until the end.”
Ouvir and escutar are used interchangeably very often, even though there’s a slight difference in meaning. Ouvir doesn’t necessarily imply paying attention. Escutar refers to making sense of what was heard or, in other words, hearing and paying attention to it. 

However, in most cases, you can use both. For example:
  • Eu ouvi um barulho estranho. 
  • Eu escutei um barulho estranho. 
Both sentences translate to “I heard a weird noise.”

18.

Tocar
“To touch”
“To make a sound”
Não toca na panela.
“Don’t touch the pan.”

O celular está tocando.
“The phone is ringing.”

A música parou de tocar.
“The music stopped playing.”
Tocar is a very versatile word that’s used in a couple of slang expressions. 

The first one is equivalent to saying “High five!”
  • Toca aqui! 
Another common use is the expression se toca! It’s used as a wakeup call:
  • Se toca! Tá achando que é quem? (“Wake up! Who do you think you are?”)
  • Cara, se toca, esse namoro já acabou. (“Dude, wake up, this relationship is over.”)

19.

Cheirar
“To smell”
Está cheirando mal aqui.
“It smells bad here.”
In Portuguese, there are several ways that you can talk about how something smells, besides using the verb cheirar. 

You can also use the verb sentir (“to feel,” see below) + the noun cheiro (“smell”): 
  • Eu sinto cheiro de café! (“I smell coffee!”)
Or you can use the verb estar (impermanent “to be”)
  • Está um cheiro bom aqui. (“It smells nice here.”)
Finally, you can opt for the verb ter (“to have”): 
  • Esta casa tem um cheiro ruim. (“This house has a bad smell.”)
In fact, if you do see the verb cheirar being used, it will probably be in a compound tense, with the verb estar.
  • Ele estava cheirando bem. (“He was smelling good.”)

20.

Sentir
“To feel”
Vocês estão se sentindo bem?
“Do you feel well?”

21.

Pensar
“To think”
Penso, logo existo.
“I think, therefore I am.”

22.

Achar
“To find”
“To think”
Achei a chave!
“I found the key!”

Eu não achei que importava.
“I didn’t think it mattered.”

23.

Saber
“To know”
Você saberá no momento certo.
“You will know at the right moment.”

24.

Querer
“To want”
Eles queriam tanto isto.
“They wanted it so bad.”

25.

Ficar
“To stay”
“To get”
“To be” (impermanent), when talking about location
Você vai ficar em casa hoje?
“Will you stay home today?”

Aqui fica frio rápido.
“It gets cold quickly here.”

O banheiro fica à esquerda.
“The bathroom is to the left.”
Ficar translates to “to get” when it’s followed by an adjective. For example:
  • Está ficando velhinha! (“You are getting a bit old!”)

26.

Precisar
“To need”
Eu preciso tanto de um banho.
“I need a shower so bad.”
Precisar acts as an auxiliary verb as well:
  • Ele precisa entender que não é fácil assim. (“He needs to understand it’s not that easy.”)

27.

Praticar
“To practice”
Eu estou praticando meu português com meu vizinho.
“I am practicing my Portuguese with my neighbor.”

28.

Pôr
“To put”
“To place”
Você sempre põe os outros em primeiro lugar.
“You always put others first.”

29.

Colocar
“To put”
“To place”
O paisagista colocou as flores exóticas no meio do jardim.
“The landscaper placed the exotic flowers in the middle of the garden.”
In Portuguese, some verbs can be transformed into another one by adding the prefix re- in front. By doing so, the new verb gains the meaning of doing the action again. 

For example, we have the verb colocar and the verb recolocar. Recolocar means “to replace.”
  • Você pode recolocar os livros na estante, por favor? (“Can you replace the books on the shelf, please?”)

30.

Passar
“To pass”
“To iron (clothes)”
Pode me passar o sal?
“Can you pass me the salt?”

Tenho que passar esta blusa primeiro.
“I have to iron this shirt first.”

31.

Chegar
“To arrive”
Meu pai chega tarde em casa.
“My dad arrives home late.”

32.

Entrar
“To enter”
Só podemos entrar até à meia-noite.
“We can only enter at midnight.”

33.

Chamar
“To call”
“To summon”
Ele me chamou super cedo hoje.
“He called me super-early today.”

Os alunos foram chamados ao escritório.
“The students were summoned to the office.”
Chamar can also mean “to draw” in the expression “to draw attention”:
  • O objetivo do protesto é chamar a atenção dos governantes. (“The protest’s goal is drawing the government’s attention.”)

34.

Mudar
“To change”
“To move”
Minha avó vai mudar as cortinas.
“My grandmother will change the curtains.”

35.

Vir
“To come (over)”
Vocês vieram jantar aqui no meu aniversário, lembram?
“You came over for dinner on my birthday, remember?”

36.

Voltar
“To come back”
“To return”
Mocinho, volte aqui!
“Young man, come back here!”

37.

Sair
“To leave”
“To go out”
Adoro sair com minhas amigas.
“I love to go out with my friends.”

38.

Partir
“To leave”
“To depart”
“To break”
“To cut (into pieces)”
Desde que você partiu, estou tão só.
“Since you left, I feel so alone.”

Quem vai partir o bolo?
“Who will cut the cake?”

39.

Deixar
“To leave (something)”
“To let”
Ela deixou a carteira aqui.
“She left the wallet here.”

Não vou deixar isso me magoar.
“I won’t let that hurt me.”

40.

Encontrar
“To meet”
“To find”
E vocês dois vão se encontrar?
“And you two are going to meet?”

Não encontro as minhas chaves.
“I can’t find my keys.”
Once again, by adding the prefix re- in front of the verb encontrar, we have another verb: reencontrar, meaning “to meet again.”
  • Meus tios finalmente se reencontraram. (“My uncles finally met again.”)

41.

Levar
“To take”
Vocês sempre esquecem de levar os presentes.
“You always forget to take the gifts with you.”

42.

Começar
“To start”
“To begin”
Meus pais começaram as aulas de dança.
“My parents started their dance lessons.”

43.

Terminar
“To finish”
“To end”
O jogo terminou empatado.
“The match ended in a tie.”

44.

Apresentar
“To present”
“To introduce”
“To perform”
O clube de teatro apresenta a nova peça.
“The theater club presents the new play.”

Gostaria de te apresentar ao meu namorado.
“I’d like to introduce you to my boyfriend.”

Minha filha se apresentou sozinha.
“My daughter performed by herself.”

45.

Conhecer
“To know”
“To meet”
“To discover”
O motorista não conhecia aquela estrada.
“The driver didn’t know that highway.”

Eu quero conhecer seu irmão.
“I want to meet your brother.”

Ela ama conhecer novas culturas.
“She loves to discover new cultures.”
Note that conhecer only means “to know” when referring to something familiar. 

For example, you can use conhecer if you know a certain street or a certain person: 
  • Você conhece a prima Luisa? (“Do you know cousin Luisa?”)
But you can’t use conhecer if referring to something you know how to do. In this case, use saber.
  • Eu sei cozinhar. (“I know how to cook.”)

46.

Conseguir
“To get” 
“To achieve (something)”
Eu não sei se ele vai conseguir o trabalho.
“I don’t know if he will get the job.”

47.

Existir
“To exist”
O futuro ainda não existe.
“The future still does not exist.”
Existir can be translated as “there is” or “there are”:
  • Nunca existiu alguém como você na minha vida. (“There was never someone like you in my life.”)

48.

Considerar
“To consider”
É uma boa ideia considerar a oferta.
“It’s a good idea to consider the offer.”

49.

Continuar
“To continue”
Os peregrinos continuaram andando por mais dois dias.
“The pilgrims continued walking for two more days.”

50.

Viver
“To live”
Queria ter vivido na Renascença.
“I wish I had lived during the Renaissance.”
In Portuguese, we use the verb viver to convey the idea of always doing something. For example:
Eu vivo dizendo isso pra ele. (“I’m always telling him that.”)
Ele vivia cantando esta música. (“He was always singing this song.”)

51.

Morrer
“To die”
Todos vamos morrer um dia.
“We will all die one day.”

52.

Tomar
“To take”
“To have (a drink)”
Você tomou seu remédio?
“Did you take your medicine?”

Vamos tomar uma cerveja!
“Let’s go have a beer!”
Tomar can be used interchangeably with beber (“to drink”).

Levar and tomar both mean “to take.” The difference is that levar implies taking something/someone somewhere:
  • Leva este vestido na viagem. (“Take this dress on your trip.”)
Tomar does not imply this concept of location:
  • Vou tomar um banho. (“I’ll take a shower.”)

53.

Acabar
“To end”
“To finish”
Acabei meu projeto ontem.
“I finished my project yesterday.”
Acabar is also used in some different situations. It can mean “is over” or “run out of”: 
  • A comida já acabou. (“We’ve run out of food.”)
It’s also very commonly used to express that something just happened: 
  • Ele acabou de começar a pintura. (“He just started the painting.”)

54.

Pegar
“To catch”
“To grasp”
Tenta pegar a bola antes que ela caia no chão.
“Try to catch the ball before it hits the floor.”

55.

Receber
“To receive”
“To get”
Meu irmão recebeu uma promoção no trabalho.
“My brother received a promotion at work.”

56.

Andar
“To walk”
Para de andar tão rápido.
“Stop walking so fast.”
It’s common to see this verb being used to express something that one has been doing or feeling: 
  • Eu ando lendo muito. (“I have been reading a lot.”)

57.

Trabalhar
“To work”
Nosso vizinho trabalha até tarde.
“Our neighbor works until late.”

58.

Criar
“To create”
“To make”
“To raise”
O designer criou um pôster lindo.
“The designer made a beautiful poster.”

Minha mãe me criou sozinha.
“My mom raised me by herself.”

59.

Pedir
“To ask”
Minha amiga pediu um favor.
“My friend asked for a favor.”

60.

Seguir
“To follow”
“To go”
O cachorro me seguiu o caminho todo.
“The dog followed me all the way.”

Pra chegar no mercado, é só seguir em frente.
“To get to the market, just go straight ahead.”
Used in the expression seguir em frente (“to move on”):
  • Quando eles terminaram, ela seguiu em frente. (“When they broke up, she moved on.”)

61.

Contar
“To count”
“To tell”
A professora contou os alunos.
“The teacher counted the students.”

A jornalista me contou que ninguém estava lá.
“The journalist told me that nobody was there.”

62.

Acontecer
“To happen”
Aconteceu exatamente assim.
“It happened exactly like that.”

63.

Afirmar
“To claim”
“To affirm”
“To state”
O diretor afirmou que tudo está funcionando bem.
“The director stated that everything is working well.”

64.

Tratar
“To treat”
O médico tratou o paciente.
“The doctor treated the patient.”

65.

Esperar
“To wait”
Eu esperei por muito tempo.
“I waited for a long time.”

66.

Usar
“To use”
Nós não usamos couro.
“We don’t use leather.”

67.

Manter
“To keep”
“To maintain”
Vou manter a esperança acesa.
“I’ll keep hope alive.”

68.

Realizar
“To accomplish”
Finalmente ele realizou seu sonho.
“He finally accomplished his dream.”

69.

Abrir
“To open”
Só pode abrir a encomenda quando eu chegar!
“Only open the package once I arrive!”

70.

Fechar
“To close”
Quase que fecham a porta na nossa cara!
“They almost closed the door right in our face!”
As in English, we also have the expression “to close a deal” using this verb:
  • Fico feliz de fechar este negócio com você. (“I am happy to close this deal with you.”)

71.

Escrever
“To write”
Eu irei escrever uma página todos os dias.
“I will write a page everyday.”

72.

Permitir
“To allow”
Seu pai jamais permitiria isso.
“Your father would never allow that.”

73.

Acreditar
“To believe”
Eu só acredito vendo.
“I only believe it when I see it.”

74.

Mostrar
“To show”
Será que pode me mostrar o carro?
“Any chance you can show me the car?”

75.

Lembrar
“To remember”
“To remind”
Ele me lembrou de comprar.
“He reminded me to buy it.”

Eu lembrarei da nossa música.
“I will remember our song.”
As in the other examples we already saw, we also have the verb relembrar, which means “to remember again.” It’s also used when talking about nostalgia and thinking about old times, as in the example:
  • Este filme me faz relembrar minha infância. (“This movie makes me remember my childhood.”)

76.

Trazer
“To bring”
Você trouxe o meu pote?
“Did you bring my tupperware?”

77.

Procurar
“To look for”
Era isso que eu procurava!
“That’s what I was looking for!”

78.

Tentar
“To try”
Não importa o quanto a gente falhe, vamos tentar de novo.
“Doesn’t matter how much we fail, we will try again.”

79.

Formar
“To form”
Formem uma fila, por favor.
“Form a line, please.”

80.

Aparecer
“To appear”
“To show up”
Ele sempre aparece descalço.
“He always shows up barefooted.”

81.

Comprar
“To buy”
Comprou o liquidificador?
“Did you buy the blender?”

82.

Cair
“To fall”
Vocês quase caíram, eu vi.
“You almost fell, I saw it.”

83.

Correr
“To run”
Eu corri pra nada.
“I ran for nothing.”

84.

Ganhar
“To win”
“To receive”
“To get”
Nós sempre ganhamos a competição da escola.
“We always win the school competition.”

Vocês ganharam um presente!
“You got a present!”

85.

Perder
“To lose”
“To miss”
Elas não vão perder.
“They won’t lose.”

Eu perdi meu vôo.
“I missed my flight.”

86.

Vencer
“To win”
Eles venceram aquele jogo.
“They won that game.”

87.

Chover
“To rain”
Ontem choveu o dia todo.
“It rained all day yesterday.”

88.

Pagar
“To pay”
Eles saíram sem pagar.
“They left without paying.”

89.

Entender
“To understand”
Eu não entendi nada.
“I didn’t understand any of it.”

90.

Parecer
“Seem”
“Look (like)”
Ele não parecia muito feliz.
“He didn’t seem very happy.”

91.

Ler
“To read”
Você leu todos esses livros?
“Did you read all these books?”

92.

Tirar
“To take away”
“To remove”
“To get” (only with grades)
Vamos tirar isto daqui.
“We will remove this from here.”

Ele tirou 10 no teste.
“He got an A on the test.”

93.

Responder
“To answer”
“To reply”
Eles nunca mais me responderam.
“They never answered me again.”

94.

Explicar
“To explain”
Vamos lá, me explica o que aconteceu.
“C’mon, explain to me what happened.”

95.

Ensinar
“To teach”
Nós ensinávamos muito bem. 
“We used to teach very well.”

96.

Descobrir
“To discover”
“To find out”
Você não sabe o que eu descobri!
“You don’t know what I found out!”

97.

Levantar
“To lift”
“To raise”
“To get up”
Levantem as mãos.
“Raise your hands.”

98.

Deitar
“To lay down”
Só vou deitar um pouco.
“I’ll just lay down a little.”

99.

Comer
“To eat”
Ela comeu uma pizza de chocolate.
“She ate a chocolate pizza.”

100.

Beber
“To drink”
Eles bebem muito café.
“They drink a lot of coffee.”
Man practicing his pronunciation of verbs

3. Continue Learning More Portuguese with PortuguesePod101

This article had a lot of information about Portuguese language verbs, and we hope that the examples and explanations were helpful to you. This list will be here for you to review and refresh your memory whenever necessary. 

Did you like learning about common Portuguese verbs and conjugations? Are there any important ones we missed? Let us know in the comments. 

And now, it’s time to put it into practice. To start, you can compare the most common verbs in any language with their Portuguese translation. Or go ahead and choose your own vocabulary list or another free resource on PortuguesePod101.

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