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PortuguesePod101’s Essential Portuguese Travel Phrase Guide

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Traveling to foreign countries is nearly always an exciting, enriching, and beneficial experience. Yet, some things can be real downers, such as boredom on a lengthy flight to Brazil. Really, binge-watching onboard movies can only be interesting for so long! And jet lag - another huge downer. Did you know that jet lag is more severe when you travel from the West to the East?

Well, we won’t know how to beat that, but there are fortunately plenty of remedies around to investigate.

To beat flight boredom, though, we may have the answer for you at PortuguesePod101! Why don’t you take the time to study Portuguese travel phrases? We make this super easy and fun, with great downloadables, like our PDF Cheat Sheets. Quickly memorize these, and impress your Portuguese friends or travel guide with your flawless Portuguese!

Table of Contents

  1. Importance Of Learning Travel Phrases
  2. 13 Must-Have Travel Phrases and Words
  3. Good-To-Have Travel Phrases
  4. Ways To Improve Communication in a Foreign Country
  5. PortuguesePod101 Can Help You Master Travel Phrases Easily and Effortlessly!

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1. Importance Of Learning Travel Phrases

Impressing Portuguese people or your travel partners will be the least of the benefits you reap from learning these helpful phrases. These are greater ones:

1) Eliminate Travel Frustration: First of all, you’ll be able to cut out a good chunk of travel frustration and inconvenience due to language barriers.

Know how to pronounce and use at least the basic Portuguese phrases, and then just look foreign. This should go a long way to help you get by and win you friends, because locals would be more inclined to help someone who took the trouble to learn a smidgen of their language.

Injured Woman In An Ambulance

2) Emergency Readiness: In case of an emergency, you will be able to get help a lot quicker if you know how to ask for what in Portuguese. Imagine miming to a doctor or nurse that you have a sore ear but that you’re allergic to penicillin. Not so easy, right?

Rather, you should know basic emergency travel phrases, especially if you suffer from a serious condition. Also, information about life-threatening allergies you have should always be on your person in the language of the country you’re visiting.

3) Sight-Seeing Readiness: Hopefully, you also travel to learn more about a country’s culture. Visiting the main tourist sites in Brazil will be more interesting if you know how to ask pertinent questions in Portuguese.

In this blog, we’ll also be giving you important travel phrases to consider - from the 13 essential must-have phrases to ones that are just generally useful and good to know.

Let’s get cracking!


2. 13 Must-Have Travel Phrases and Words

Preparing to Travel

Seasoned explorers of multiple countries will tell you that certain words and phrases are absolute must-knows in anyone’s travel vocabulary. Learning from them, we collated some of the most essential ones here for you.

If you know these travel phrases and words by heart in Portuguese, you will be much better equipped for your visit than most of your movie-binging travel mates.

1) Obrigado (Thank you)

As a tourist, you will be relying on the kindness of strangers to get by. Repay them with a small acknowledgment of their friendly generosity - know how to say “thank you” in Portuguese.

2) Você fala inglês? (Do you speak English?)

While it may be a bit of a cop-out, sometimes you just can’t figure out how to communicate. Maybe you’re blanking on one specific word you need, maybe they’re speaking with a heavy accent, or maybe it’s just really late and you really want to get to the hotel. In that case, try asking if they speak English, and hopefully you can make things a little bit simpler for yourself.

Don’t abuse this phrase, though! If you just try to get by without learning any of the local language, not only will you not learn anything - you’ll be out of luck if they can’t speak English!

Man Greeting Someone

3) Tem algum ônibus que vai do aeroporto até a cidade? (Is there a bus from the airport to the city?)

Public transit is usually cheaper, if slower, than taking a taxi or rideshare. Use this phrase to see if you can get where you’re going when you’re strapped for cash, or just when you’d like to take the scenic route into town!

4) Esse é o ônibus que vai até o aeroporto? (Is this the right bus for the airport?)

Likewise, if you’re the kind of person who can get themselves moving early (or maybe you just have a late flight), maybe you want to take the bus to the airport rather than taking a cab. If that’s the case, you’ll want to be sure you’re actually heading the right way! You wouldn’t want to end up at a lookout point half an hour away, watching your flight take off in the distance, would you?

5) Com licença, quanto é a passagem? (Excuse me, what’s the fare?)

If you are paying for a cab, you’ll want to know how much. Most legal taxis will have meters, but when dealing with a currency you’re not familiar with, it can be worth asking just to double check that you’re paying the right amount - especially if the currency has cents.

6) Eu tenho uma reserva (I have a reservation)

This one you can expect to use at least a few times throughout your trip, unless you’re the kind of person who travels by the seat of their pants and just goes to whatever hotel, motel, or hostel has rooms available.

7) Você tem um quarto vago pra hoje? (Do you have any vacancies tonight?)

If that’s the case, you’ll definitely be using this phrase instead. Quite possibly a lot, depending on how lucky you are!

Couple with a Map

8 ) Onde fica a estação de trem? (Where is the train station?)

If you’re in a country with an expansive commuter rail system (or maybe just a fan of other types of locomotives), you may want to know where the closest station is. Just don’t go looking for pennies on the rails!

9) Eu sou alérgico a amendoins (I am allergic to peanuts)

Replace “peanuts” with whatever the word for your allergen may be. If your allergy is serious, you probably already know the importance of stating this very clearly in Portuguese.

If the condition is life-threatening, be sure to have a letter or prescription from a medical professional in Portuguese on your person at all times. Consider getting a medical alert bracelet specially made in Portuguese if your stay will be longer than a month or so.

Person Declining Meat

10) Você tem algum prato vegetariano? (Do you have any vegetarian dishes?)

If you dislike eating certain things, or you have certain dietary restrictions, it would be best if you knew how to convey this clearly in Portuguese.

Remember, though, that saying “I’m vegan” or “I’m diabetic” may not be enough to get you what you want. The rules for veganism and vegetarianism are not standard everywhere in the world. Also, your patron might not understand what “diabetic” means. If you have a medical condition, it would be best to research some in-depth vocabulary beforehand.

11) Você me vê um mapa? (Could I get a map?)

Planning on exploring your destination? Hopelessly lost? Maybe just an amateur cartographer? No matter the reason, this phrase is sure to come in handy. That said, you’re more likely to get use out of it at some sort of tourist or travel center than you are asking a random passerby on the street.

12) Quanto custa este daqui? (How much is this?)

Even if you’re not a big shopper, you’re probably going to need this phrase at some point. Knowing how to count in Portuguese will, of course, help a lot with purchases too.

13) Você aceita cartão de crédito? (Do you take credit card?)

This is another travel phrase that will smooth your monetary transactions considerably.

Man Giving Credit Card to a Clerk


3. Good-To-Have Travel Phrases

Travel Verbs

Unlike the previous phrases, these are not really essential so much as they are useful. Yet, knowing these will still smooth over some bumps on your journey, more than just knowing the crucial phrases would.

1) O Wi-Fi é gratuito? (Is the Wi-Fi free?)

If you’re abroad, your normal cellular plans probably won’t have any service, and you’ll be totally reliant on publically available Wi-Fi while you’re out and about. Just ask a server, clerk, or attendant, and they’ll be happy to let you know. Just make sure you’re paying attention when they tell you the password!

2) Você pode tirar uma foto pra mim, por favor? (Could you take a picture of me please?)

What would a trip be with no photos to commemorate the event? Just be sure to ask this of someone who actually looks like they’d be willing to, unless you’re willing to risk being given the cold shoulder or worse. If you’re at a tourist attraction, you’ll find that most people are more than happy to take one for you, so long as you take one of them as well!

3) Você tem alguma sugestão? (Do you have any recommendations?)

Eating alone in a restaurant? Or going out with new Portuguese friends or business colleagues? Let them help you decide what to have.

4) Eu gostaria de um lugar para não fumantes, por favor (I’d like to have a non-smoking seat, please)

Though smoking has gone out of fashion in some places, it’s still popular in others. In the event you’re at a restaurant where smoking is allowed on premises, you can always ask this question to the staff and be seated elsewhere.

5) Uma água, por favor (Water, please)

If you’ve emptied your glass, or are cutting yourself off after a few drinks, you can always ask for some water. It can be especially useful if the restaurant is busy to the point you need to call out to someone to get service.

6) Você pode trazer a conta? (Could I have the check?)

To finish off the restaurant related phrases, if you’re eating with friends or really want to impress your colleagues, taking the bill can be a nice treat for them. Of course, this phrase could come in handy as well if you’re eating alone and you’re just impatient to leave.

7) O que você recomenda para souvenir? (What do you recommend for a souvenir?)

Now that your trip is over, what better way to cap it all off than a memento, or maybe a gift for friends and family at home? It’ll be nicer to have something recommended by the locals than a cheap bauble from the airport store, so go ahead and ask someone you’ve met what they think.


4. Ways To Improve Communication in a Foreign Country

Survival Phrases

When traveling, it’s possible to keep communication smooth when you don’t share a language.

Do so by keeping these five tips in mind. They are aimed to help you communicate with those who cannot speak English very well, and also to keep your traveling experience pleasant!

1. Keep your English simple and easy to understand.
If the person you are talking to speaks very little English, use basic verbs, adjectives, and nouns, and keep sentences short.

However, don’t patronize them by talking in pidgin or like you would address a child. Keep your speech simple but natural, and use the correct grammar.

For instance, don’t say: “You come when?”. If you say: “When will you come?”, you will very likely be understood, and may even help someone who wants to improve their English.

2. Ask someone to write information down.
Apply Rule 1 first at your hotel, where the staff is very likely to be able to speak some English. Get them to write down, in their native language, things like: “I would like to go to the airport, please,” “Please take me to the beach,” or “Where is the closest bathroom?”

These written questions are something you can then give to taxi drivers or any other people who are willing and able to help you. This simple step could make your life a lot easier when you travel to a foreign country!

3. Avoid asking leading questions!
If you want the correct information from a non-native English speaker, that is.

When you need directions, for instance, don’t ask: “To get to the bus stop, do I need to turn left here?” If the person didn’t really understand you, you will probably just get a smile and a “Yes,” which could possibly make you miss your bus.

Rather, you should ask: “Where is the bus stop?” If they understand you, you will get the correct directions.

4. Pick the right person to ask for help.
Time to look at people and think a bit about their appearance! A younger person who looks like they might be a student is more likely to have English skills than the friendly but ancient lady smiling at you from a fruit stall.

If you don’t see anyone like that, head into town to the nearest bank, hospital, pharmacy, or hotel. The staff at those places usually speak a bit of English.

5. Know when to quit.
If you stuck to the above rules, but the person you are talking to only stares at you blankly, say thank you and leave. Hanging around hoping someone will suddenly understand and respond is just wasting your time, and may irritate them as well. Go find someone else.


5. PortuguesePod101 Can Help You Master Travel Phrases Easily and Effortlessly!

So, reader, have you found this article helpful?

Do you feel comfortable enough to use some essential travel phrases in Portuguese? We’d also love to hear if you think we left out important travel phrases. Leave your suggestions and opinions in the comments!

PortuguesePod101 takes the lead with many free learning tools to help you master Portuguese reading and speaking easily, and in fun ways.

These tools include:

- An extensive vocabulary list, regularly updated
- A new Portuguese word to learn every day
- Quick access to the Portuguese Key Phrase List
- A free Portuguese online dictionary
- The excellent 100 Core Portuguese Word List
- An almost limitless Lesson Library for learners of all levels

You will also have access to topic-specific recordings like our Before You Travel: Survival Phrases lesson.

Learn even more efficiently with the help of a personal tutor, after taking an assessment test to personalize and tailor your training.

Getting a tutor is also a good option if you meet challenges in your learning, or need to fast-track correct pronunciation and diction. Your very own friendly, Portuguese-speaking teacher will be only a text away on a special app, anywhere, anytime - an excellent option for business persons!

Using a guided learning system that was developed by experts in language and online education, you’ll receive personal feedback and constant support to improve in no time. You’ll also be tasked with weekly assignments in reading, writing, and speaking to hone your Portuguese speaking skills.

Imagine how impressed your Portuguese friends or colleagues will be when you display your excellent conversational skills! With PortuguesePod101, getting there will be easy and fun.

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How to Use Portuguese Numbers for Daily Usage

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Especially if you’re planning a prolonged visit to Brazil, using the correct Portuguese numbers for counting in Portuguese could be very important! Number systems are the other alphabet in any language. In fact, it is a language all of its own, and it serves a multitude of excellent purposes.

Table of Contents

  1. A Brief History of Counting and Number Systems
  2. Why is it Important to Learn Portuguese Numbers?
  3. Learning Portuguese Numbers
  4. Why Choose PortuguesePod101 to Learn all about Portuguese Numbers?

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Count to One Billion in Portuguese


1. A Brief History of Counting and Number Systems

Abacus

1. The Ishango Bone

The origin of counting, and with it numbers, is not clear to historians. While their art showed that prehistoric man had a concept of numbers, the first indication of a formal system was found to be only between 20,000 and 35,000 thousand years old. This discovery came around 1960 in the form of the so-called Ishango Bone found in the Congo, Central Africa.

The 10cm/4 inch piece of bone was a fibula from a baboon. It showed markings with a neat, unified pattern of small lines - far too organized and sophisticated to have formed spontaneously. Archeologists believe that those thin markings were carved to keep score of, or count, something. The lines seemed to represent a sequence of prime numbers and a series of duplications. Some even called it the first-ever pocket calculator!

2. Mesopotamia and Greece

Yet, evidence suggests that it wasn’t until about 4,000 years ago that humans truly started counting and using numbers. Together with the development of civilization came developed agriculture, and the need for measurement and score-keeping was increased.

For this reason, a formal number system and mathematics were developed first in the Middle East, in what was then called Mesopotamia. Mesopotamia was roughly situated in the area of modern-day Iraq and Kuwait. Allegedly, the system was pretty simple at first. Citizens used tokens that represented a certain number of items, such as one token equalling four goats, etc. This eventually evolved into a system of score marks pressed into clay, which ultimately went on to influence Greek mathematics.

3. Hindu-Arabic Numbers

Zero, meanwhile, was conceived later and elsewhere. Inspired by the Hindu religion, which allows for the concept of infinity and eternity, the Indians invented a symbol to represent nothing. The magic of the zero lies not in itself but its combination with other numbers.

The Indians were also the creators of today’s numbers, which are often referred to as Hindu-Arabic numbers. These comprise one or a combination of just ten symbols or digits: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 0.

Europe learned of this numeric system only around 1200 A.D., when they were introduced to it by an Italian mathematician called Leonardo Pisano Bigollo.

Pisano, also known as Fibonacci, is famous for the discovery of a mathematical sequence with countless applications. Yes, math buffs, it’s the well-known Fibonacci sequence, also called the Golden Mean.

The Roman numeric system, which was clumsy next to the newer inventions, gradually lost popularity in the West. It’s from here that they “slowly spread to conquer the world,'’ as Steven Law puts it.


2. Why is it Important to Learn Portuguese Numbers?

For us at PortuguesePod101, this is an easy question to answer! Because we know that numbers are a global unifier.

Counting and numbers have made our lives easier since they were first formulated, even in their most primitive forms.

Numbers in Industry

Without knowing your numbers, you can’t properly communicate about or deal with the following:

1) Your date/time of birth, i.e., your age: This is vital information to be able to give to people like doctors, employers, law enforcement, and so forth.

2) Banking: Worldwide, our monetary systems are built on numbers. Interest, credit scores, and loans all rely on math beyond simple finger counting.

3) Time: Without knowing how to say numbers, you can’t talk or ask about the time and expect to get a useful response. You don’t want to miss an appointment or schedule something for the wrong hour!

4) Ordering data: Numbers bring order to a mostly random life! Scientists even say that numbers and the way they are organized underpin the whole universe. From using them to count your meals’ calories and the number of likes your posts get on social media, to drawing up intricate data charts and explaining existence itself - numbers are what makes these things possible.

All of the above and more are reasons why it is important to know your numbers if you plan on travelling or becoming a foreign worker abroad, in Brazil or anywhere else!

Little Girl Counting


3. Learning Portuguese Numbers

Now, let’s explore the Portuguese number system a bit more! Take a look at this infographic.

Language Numbers

Can you make out for yourself what the Portuguese numbers between one (1) and nine (9) look and sound like? Easy, right?

Or, if you struggled a bit, no problem. Why not listen to how Portuguese numbers one (1) through ten (10) sound when pronounced by our native Portuguese speaker and friendly PortuguesePod101 teacher?

Then, share with us in the comments your native language’s romanized pronunciation of your number system. We’d love to see all the different ways the same numbers can be pronounced!

Hand With a Thumbs Up

When you have mastered the first ten numbers, you have basically nailed the most significant part of the number system. Well done! Curious to learn the numbers from eleven upward? No problem! Why not subscribe and enroll with us now to immediately enjoy this lesson, teaching you all about Portuguese numbers eleven (11) to one hundred (100)?

Finally, if you’re curious how the numbers look once you’ve broken one hundred, why not check out our Portuguese number vocabulary page? You can see the numbers we’ve just covered, all the way up to four thousand (4,000). Plus, you can also see the Portuguese words for different numbers used in example sentences, to get an idea of how you can use them in your day-to-day conversations!


4. Why Choose PortuguesePod101 to Learn all about Portuguese Numbers?

PortuguesePod101, like all Innovative Language Learning ventures, takes the pain out of learning a new language by adding a lot of fun. It’s never an easy thing to learn a new language, but we formulated all your lessons so they’re nicely bite-sized, and geared to keep you motivated!

Also, we created a great number of fantastic tools to help keep struggle and boredom out of the learning process.

  • Fun and Easy Learning: It’s a commonly-known fact that when learning is made easy and fun, student motivation rises. And as motivation rises, so does the effort to learn - what a beautiful cycle! PortuguesePod101’s language learning system is designed to get you speaking from the onset. Learn at your own convenience and pace with our short, effective, and fun audio podcast lessons. Our Learning Center is comprehensive and state-of-the-art, with a vibrant user community to connect with! Our lessons are recorded with native hosts and voice actors, providing a diverse range of dialects in your lessons. You can be confident that native speakers will understand you when speaking Portuguese!
  • Innovative Learning Tools and Apps: We make it our priority to offer you the best learning tools! These include apps for iPhone, iPad, Android, and Mac OSX; eBooks for Kindle, Nook, and iPad; audiobooks; Roku TV and so many more. This means that we took diverse lifestyles into account when we developed our courses, so you can learn anywhere, anytime on a device of your choice. How innovative!
  • Free Resources: Sharing is caring, and for this reason, we share many free resources with our students. For instance, start learning Portuguese with our basic online course by creating a lifetime account - for free! Also get free daily and iTunes lessons, free eBooks, free mobile apps, and free access to our blog and online community. Or how about free Vocabulary Lists? The Portuguese dictionary is for exclusive use by our students, also for free. There’s so much to love about PortuguesePod101…!
  • Live Hosts and One-on-One Learning: Knowledgeable, energetic hosts present recorded video lessons, and are available for live teaching experiences if you upgrade. This means that in the videos, you get to watch them pronounce those tongue-twisters as if you’re learning live! Add octane to your learning by upgrading to Premium Plus, and learn two times faster. You can have your very own Portuguese teacher always with you, ensuring that you learn what you need, when you need to - what a wonderful opportunity to master a new language in record time!
  • Start Where You Are: You don’t know a single Portuguese word? Not to worry, we’ve absolutely got this. Simply enroll in our Absolute Beginner Pathway and start speaking from Lesson 1! As your learning progresses, you can enroll in other pathways to match your Portuguese level, at your own pace, in your own time, in your own place!

So, why wait? Sign up with PortuguesePod101 right away! Also, let us know in the comments if you’ve used this blog post, or any of the free lessons anywhere to master Portuguese numbers. Or, even better - share your birthdate using what you’ve learned!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Count to One Billion in Portuguese

How To Post In Perfect Portuguese on Social Media

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You’re learning to speak Portuguese, and it’s going well. Your confidence is growing! So much so that you feel ready to share your experiences on social media—in Portuguese.

At Learn Portuguese, we make this easy for you to get it right the first time. Post like a boss with these phrases and guidelines, and get to practice your Portuguese in the process.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Portuguese

1. Talking about Your Restaurant Visit in Brazilian Portuguese

Eating out is fun, and often an experience you’d like to share. Take a pic, and start a conversation on social media in Portuguese. Your friend will be amazed by your language skills…and perhaps your taste in restaurants!

Eduardo eats at a restaurant with his friends, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

POST

Let’s break down Eduardo’s post.

Esperando o pedido. Que fome!
“Waiting for the order. I’m so hungry!”

1- Esperando o pedido.

First is an expression meaning “Waiting for the order.”
Pedido (”order” ) here is used as a noun. But it can also be an adjective (”ordered or asked” ), or even a verb. So, pay attention to the context.

2- Que fome!

Then comes the phrase - “I’m so hungry!”
This is the informal, common way of saying you’re hungry, without adding the subject. It’s similar to “such a hunger.” You can use it to talk about other people’s hunger, too.

COMMENTS

In response, Eduardo’s friends leave some comments.

1- Pena que não pude ir…

His girlfriend, Luiza, uses an expression meaning - “Too bad I couldn’t go…”
Luiza is feeling wistful and expresses a regret that she wasn’t at the restaurant.

2- Fiquei com água na boca!

His neighbor, Gabriela, uses an expression meaning - “It made my mouth water!”
Gabriela is commenting on the food in the photo to stay part of the conversation.

3- Vai se acabar de comer hoje, hein?

His college friend, Lucas, uses an expression meaning - “Gonna eat until you drop today, huh?”
Lucas is commenting in a teasing, joking way.

4- Bom apetite!

His supervisor, Paulo, uses an expression meaning - “Enjoy your food!”
This is a commonly-used well wish, slightly old fashioned.

VOCABULARY

Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • pedido: “order”
  • fome: “hunger”
  • pena: “pity”
  • apetite: “appetite”
  • esperar: “to wait”
  • hein: “huh”
  • comer: “to eat”
  • So, let’s practice a bit. If a friend posted something about having dinner with friends, which phrase would you use?

    Now go visit a Portuguese restaurant, and wow everyone with your language skills!

    2. Post about Your Mall Visit in Brazilian Portuguese

    Another super topic for social media is shopping—everybody does it, most everybody loves it, and your friends on social media are probably curious about your shopping sprees! Share these Portuguese phrases in posts when you visit a mall.

    Luiza shops with her sister at the mall, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Luiza’s post.

    Fazendo compras com a minha irmã querida! Estava com saudades!
    “Going shopping with my dear sister! I was missing her!”

    1- Fazendo compras

    First is an expression meaning “Going shopping.”
    Fazer compras means to go shopping. It shouldn’t be confused with the gerund “comprando” which means “the act of buying”.

    2- Estava com saudades (dela)!

    Then comes the phrase - “I was missing her!”
    “Estar com saudades” is used to express that you miss someone.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Luiza’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Que gostoso, divirtam-se! Beijos para as duas.

    Her neighbor, Gabriela, uses an expression meaning - “How delightful. Have fun! Kisses to both of you.”
    This is fun, warmhearted commentary on Luiza’s restaurant excursion.

    2- Causando no shopping!

    Her high school friend, Helena, uses an expression meaning - “Raising hell at the mall!”
    Helena comments lightheartedly, and teasing Luizia to be part of the conversation,

    3- Me avise se precisarem de carona.

    Her boyfriend, Eduardo, uses an expression meaning - “Let me know if you need a ride.”
    Considerate Eduardo expresses his caring by offering Luiza a ride.

    4- Vocês realmente precisam de mais roupas?

    Her nephew, André, uses an expression meaning - “Do you really need more clothes?”
    André is not a very optimistic, friendly nephew, is he? He complains indirectly about Luiza’s spending habits.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • saudade: “longing, missing, yearning”
  • avisar: “to tell”
  • shopping: “mall”
  • carona: “ride”
  • compra: “shopping, purchase”
  • precisar: “to need”
  • realmente:”really”
  • So, if a friend posted something about going shopping, which phrase would you use?

    3. Talking about a Sport Day in Brazilian Portuguese

    Sport events, whether you’re the spectator or the sports person, offer fantastic opportunity for great social media posts. Learn some handy phrases and vocabulary to start a sport-on-the-beach conversation in Portuguese.

    Eduardo plays with his friends at the beach, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eduardo’s post.

    Vôlei na praia com o pessoal, a melhor parte das férias!
    “Volleyball on the beach with the guys, the best part of vacation!”

    1- Vôlei na praia com o pessoal

    First is an expression meaning “Volleyball on the beach with the guys.”
    Vôlei na praia means “volley on the beach,” not to be confused with vôlei de praia, which means “beach volleyball,” the official sport. When followed by the masculine article o, the noun pessoal always means “the guys, folks, etc.” In other situations, it means “personal, private, staff”.

    2- a melhor parte das férias

    Then comes the phrase - “the best part of the vacation”
    Férias is only used in the plural form. There is no singular form, and the rest of the sentence should follow it’s plural condition.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eduardo’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Aproveite bem suas férias e volte descansado. Abraços.

    His supervisor, Paulo, uses an expression meaning - “Enjoy your vacation and come back well rested. Hugs.”
    A slightly old-fashioned comment, this is nevertheless warmhearted and sincere.

    2- Jogando vôlei? Vê se volta inteiro!

    His college friend, Lucas, uses an expression meaning - “Playing volleyball? Come back in one piece.”
    Lucas is joking about Eduardo’s sport abilities.

    3- Também quero! Me chama!

    His high school friend, Lígia, uses an expression meaning - “I want to play too! Ask me!”
    This friend wants to be part of the action. A lighthearted comment and expression of a wish.

    4- Vôlei, tem certeza? Aposto que vai acabar jogando futevôlei…

    His girlfriend’s nephew, André, uses an expression meaning - “Volleyball, are you sure? I bet you’ll end up playing footvolley…”
    André clearly doesn’t have much faith in Eduardo’s sport talent.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • abraço: “hug”
  • pessoal: “folks, guys”
  • férias: “vacation, holiday”
  • inteiro: “whole”
  • certeza: “assurance, certainty”
  • futevôlei: “footvolley”
  • descansado: “rested”
  • Which phrase would you use if a friend posted something about sports?

    But sport is not the only thing you can play! Play some music, and share it on social media.

    4. Share a Song on Social Media in Brazilian Portuguese

    Music is the language of the soul, they say. So, don’t hold back—share what touches your soul with your friends!

    Luiza shares a song she just heard at a party, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Luiza’s post.

    E quando tocam sua música preferida na festa? Me emocionei.
    “What about your favorite song being played at the party? I’m touched.”

    1- E quando tocam sua música preferida na festa?

    First is an expression meaning “What about your favorite song being played at the party? .”
    This can also be translated as “and when they play your favorite song at the party?” Música can refer to “music” as a whole, but also to a song, which is the case here. So you can have the plural músicas to say “songs”.

    2- Me emocionei.

    Then comes the phrase - “I was moved..”
    It means you were “moved, touched” emotionally.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Luiza’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Não chora para não borrar a maquiagem!

    Her high school friend, Helena, uses an expression meaning - “Don’t cry or you’ll ruin your makeup!”
    Girlie advice that’s also a bit funny.

    2- A festa parece ótima. Divirta-se.

    Her supervisor, Paulo, uses an expression meaning - “The party sounds great. Have a good time.”
    A standard comment wish that’s safe to use, if not a bit old fashioned.

    3- Não sabia que você gostava desta banda. É a minha favorita!

    Her boyfriend’s high school friend, Lígia, uses an expression meaning - “I didn’t know you liked this band. They’re my favorite!”
    Eduardo’s friend is making conversation by sharing a bit of personal information.

    4- Estou chegando daqui a pouco!

    Her boyfriend, Eduardo, uses an expression meaning - “I’ll be there soon!”
    Eduardo lets Luiza know that he will be joining her.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • música: “song”
  • preferido: “favorite”
  • emocionar: “to touch, to move (emotionally)”
  • maquiagem: “makeup”
  • tocar: “to play”
  • festa: “party”
  • chorar: “to cry”
  • Which song would you share? And what would you say to a friend who posted something about sharing music or videos?

    Now you know how to start a conversation about a song or a video on social media!

    5. Brazilian Portuguese Social Media Comments about a Concert

    Still on the theme of music—visiting live concerts and shows just have to be shared with your friends. Here are some handy phrases and vocab to wow your followers in Portuguese!

    Eduardo goes to a concert, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eduardo’s post.

    O show finalmente começou!
    “The show’s finally started!”

    1- O show

    First is an expression meaning “The concert.”
    In Portuguese, show generally means a musical concert. It isn’t used to refer to a TV show, like in English. It can also be used as an adjective meaning “awesome, great”.

    2- finalmente começou

    Then comes the phrase - “has finally started.”
    Finalmente is a regular time adverb, so it modifies the following verb by giving it an end. It can be used just like “finally” and “at last.” So, here, it modifies the verb “started” (começou).

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eduardo’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Grava aquela música que eu adoro?

    His college friend, Lucas, uses an expression meaning - “Please, record that song that I love!”
    Lucas is requesting a favor from Eduardo regarding a particular song.

    2- Não acredito que não consegui comprar o ingresso a tempo…

    His girlfriend, Luiza, uses an expression meaning - “I can’t believe I couldn’t buy a ticket in time…”
    Luiza is regretful that she’s missing out on this action.

    3- Eles são demais! Bom show.

    His neighbor, Gabriela, uses an expression meaning - “They’re awesome! Have a nice concert.”
    A sweet, warmhearted comment that wishes the concertgoers the best.

    4- Ainda bem que você não me convidou…

    His girlfriend’s nephew, André, uses an expression meaning - “I’m glad you didn’t invite me…”
    André is a bit of a wet rag, isn’t he? Why would he be so negative about the concert?

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • finalmente: “finally”
  • gravar: “to record”
  • adorar: “to love”
  • ingresso: “ticket”
  • demais: “great”
  • convidar: “to invite”
  • show: “concert”
  • If a friend posted something about a concert , which phrase would you use?

    6. Talking about an Unfortunate Accident in Brazilian Portuguese

    Oh dear. You broke something by accident. Use these Portuguese phrases to start a thread on social media. Or maybe just to let your friends know why you are not contacting them!

    Luiza accidentally breaks her mobile phone, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Luiza’s post.

    Olha o que aconteceu! Ele era novinho…
    “Look what happened! It was brand new…”

    1- Olha o que aconteceu!

    First is an expression meaning “Look what happened!.”
    A common informal phrase to call attention to something that happened.

    2- Ele era novinho…

    Then comes the phrase - “It was brand new…”
    Remember: in Portuguese there’s no equivalent to “it.” “It” is always “she” or “him,” according to the gender of the noun. A cellphone, then, is a “he.” The diminutive here is used to emphasize the quality (”new” ).

    COMMENTS

    In response, Luiza’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ah, por isso você não responde minhas mensagens.

    Her boyfriend, Eduardo, uses an expression meaning - “Oh, that’s why you’re not answering my texts.”
    Eduardo finally understands why he’s not getting reaction from his girlfriend.

    2- Coitada! O que rolou? Espero que você esteja bem!

    Her neighbor, Gabriela, uses an expression meaning - “You poor thing! What happened? I hope you’re okay.”
    Gabriela comments in sympathy and commiseration.

    3- Não se esqueça de ver se a garantia cobre.

    Her supervisor, Paulo, uses an expression meaning - “Don’t forget to check if it’s covered by the warranty.”
    Paulo, ever the responsible person, gives advice to Luiza about insurance.

    4- Parabéns! Mandou bem.

    Her nephew, André, uses an expression meaning - “Bravo! Well done.”
    Here André is sarcastic, and he sounds a bit nasty.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • novinho (novo): “new”
  • acontecer: “to happen”
  • mensagem: “text, message “
  • coitado: “poor thing”
  • garantia: “warranty”
  • cobrir: “to cover”
  • responder: “to answer”
  • If a friend posted something about having broken something by accident, which phrase would you use?

    So, now you know how to describe an accident in Portuguese. Well done!

    7. Chat about Your Boredom on Social Media in Brazilian Portuguese

    Sometimes, we’re just bored with how life goes. And to alleviate the boredom, we write about it on social media. Add some excitement to your posts by addressing your friends and followers in Portuguese!

    Eduardo gets bored at home, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eduardo’s post.

    Vai ter algum rolê interessante hoje? Estou muito bodeado.
    “Is there anything good going on tonight? I’m very bored.”

    1- Vai ter algum rolê interessante hoje?

    First is an expression meaning “Is there anything good going on tonight?.”
    Rolê is a common slang term, especially among millennials. It means “a night out, a date, to take a walk, a drive by.” It’s used as a masculine noun. You say you’re “taking a rolê” - “dar um rolê”. Here, Eduardo is asking if there’s any rolê being planned. In terms of grammar, it’s used exactly as “date” - it can also mean, literally, “a date”.

    2- Estou muito bodeado.

    Then comes the phrase - “I’m very bored..”
    This is a slang adjective, meaning you’re “bored, annoyed, discouraged or bummed out.” It derives from the slang “estar de bode”, which has the same meaning. In this context, it means Eduardo is very bored, as he used the adverb muito (”very” ) to state it.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eduardo’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Vamos beber mais tarde!

    His college friend, Lucas, uses an expression meaning - “Let’s drink later today!”
    Lucas hopes to lift his friends spirit with the idea of having a drink together later.

    2- Ah, amor, não fica triste!

    His girlfriend, Luiza, uses an expression meaning - “Oh, sweetie, don’t be sad!”
    Luiza is sweet and sensitive to her boyfriend.

    3- Se quiser fazer alguma coisa, me dá um toque!

    His high school friend, Lígia, uses an expression meaning - “If you want to hang out, give me a call!”
    Another invitation to alleviate Eduardo’s boredom - he has good friends!

    4- Desculpe, mas hoje a sua namorada é minha!

    His girlfriend’s high school friend, Helena, uses an expression meaning - “I’m sorry, but today your girlfriend is mine!”
    Helena must be reminding Eduardo here of her date with Luiza, which means he, Eduardo, cannot expect Luiza to entertain him later.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • rolê: “a date, a night out, a walk”
  • bodeado: “bored, bummed”
  • interessante: “interesting”
  • triste: “sad”
  • toque: “call; touch”
  • algum: “some, any”
  • coisa: “thing”
  • namorada: “girlfriend”
  • If a friend posted something about being bored, which phrase would you use?

    Still bored? Share another feeling and see if you can start a conversation!

    8. Exhausted? Share It on Social Media in Brazilian Portuguese

    Sitting in public transport after work, feeling like chatting online? Well, converse in Portuguese about how you feel, and let your friends join in!

    Luiza feels exhausted after a long day at work, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Luiza’s post.

    Trabalhar, trabalhar e trabalhar… Cadê o fim de semana?
    “Work, work, work… where’s the weekend?”

    1- Trabalhar, trabalhar e trabalhar…

    First is an expression meaning “Work, work, and work….”
    Although in English the more common use of “work” is as a noun, in Portuguese you use it as a verb in the infinitive. Literally the translation would be “to work, to work, and to work”.

    2- Cadê o fim de semana?

    Then comes the phrase - “Where is the weekend?.”
    Cadê, or “where (is it),” is an informal expression. The more formal equivalent would be onde está (”where is” ), but they mean the same thing. This expression is very common throughout Brazil.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Luiza’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Estou torcendo para ele chegar mais cedo!

    Her high school friend, Helena, uses an expression meaning - “I’m hoping it’ll arrive soon!”
    Helena is generously hoping time will move fast for Luiza.

    2- Nem me fala! Idem.

    Her neighbor, Gabriela, uses an expression meaning - “Tell me about it! Same here.”
    Gabriela comments in sympathy, as she’s also tired of work.

    3- Vamos fazer um happy hour para relaxar!

    Her college friend, Lucas, uses an expression meaning - “Let’s go to a happy hour to relax!”
    With this comment, Lucas is optimistic that they can have a good time together later.

    4- Vem logo para casa! Já estou com saudade.

    Her boyfriend, Eduardo, uses an expression meaning - “Come home quickly! I miss you already.”
    Eduardo comments in a sweet, loving way to his girlfriend.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • trabalhar: “to work”
  • cadê: “where (is it)”
  • fim de semana: “weekend”
  • torcer: “to hope, to cheer; to twist”
  • cedo: “early”
  • relaxar: “to relax”
  • logo: “soon”
  • If a friend posted something about being exhausted, which phrase would you use?

    Now you know how to say you’re exhausted in Portuguese! Well done.

    9. Talking about an Injury in Brazilian Portuguese

    So life happens, and you manage to hurt yourself during a soccer game. Very Tweet-worthy! Here’s how to do it in Portuguese.

    Eduardo suffers a painful injury, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eduardo’s post.

    Desta vez me machuquei mesmo. Sem treinos por algumas semanas.
    “This time I really got injured. No training for a few weeks.”

    1- Desta vez me machuquei mesmo.

    First is an expression meaning “This time I really got injured..”
    Desta is a contraction. The preposition de is combined with the demonstrative pronoun esta, forming desta - which means “this”.

    2- Sem treinos por algumas semanas.

    Then comes the phrase - “No training for a few weeks..”
    Sem means “without” but it’s also used in Portuguese at the beginning of sentences to designate when there isn’t or there won’t be something. So, sem treinos por algumas semanas means “no training for a few weeks.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eduardo’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Uiui.

    His girlfriend’s nephew, André, uses an expression meaning - “Ouch.”
    André sounds uncharacteristically sympathetic here.

    2- Você se recupera rápido! Não vai demorar tudo isso.

    His high school friend, Lígia, uses an expression meaning - “You’ll recover soon! It won’t take that long.”
    This is an optimistic, encouraging comment to lift Eduardo’s spirit.

    3- Espero que não tenha sido nada sério.

    His neighbor, Gabriela, uses an expression meaning - “I hope it wasn’t serious.”
    Gabriela expresses concern here.

    4- Vamos pôr gelo todo dia.

    His girlfriend, Luiza, uses an expression meaning - “We’ll put ice on it every day.”
    Luiza has a plan and will play nurse later on.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • machucar: “to hurt”
  • treino: “training session”
  • semana: “week”
  • esperar: “to hope”
  • gelo: “ice”
  • sério: “serious”
  • recuperar: “to recover”
  • If a friend posted something about being injured, which phrase would you use?

    We love to share our fortunes and misfortunes; somehow that makes us feel connected to others.

    10. Starting a Conversation Feeling Disappointed in Brazilian Portuguese

    Sometimes things don’t go the way we planned. Share your disappointment about this with your friends!

    Luiza feels disappointed about today’s weather, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Luiza’s post.

    Planejamos ir ao parque. Saindo de casa, começou a chover… que sorte.
    “We made plans to go to the park. When we were leaving home, it started to rain…just my luck.”

    1- Planejamos ir ao parque.

    First is an expression meaning “We made plans to go to the park..”
    It literally means “we planned on going to the park.” The verb planejar (”to plan” ) doesn’t require a preposition after it. It can be followed by a verb or a noun, or even an adjective.

    2- Saindo de casa, começou a chover… que sorte.

    Then comes the phrase - “Leaving home, it started to rain… just my luck..”
    In Portuguese, the verb “rain” never has a subject. In this case, the expression que sorte (”just my luck” ) is sarcastic, meaning bad luck. But it can also be used with a non-sarcastic connotation, when something was really an event of good luck. Depending on the context, it can also mean “just your luck” or anybody’s luck - hers, his, theirs, ours, etc.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Luiza’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Se quiserem vir aqui comer um lanche, me avisem!

    Her neighbor, Gabriela, uses an expression meaning - “If you guys want, come over and have some snacks. Just let me know!”
    Gabriela is extending a warm invitation to Luiza and Eduardo.

    2- Dane-se a chuva! Se joga!

    Her high school friend, Helena, uses an expression meaning - “To hell with the rain! You go, girl!”
    Helena thinks they should brave the rain anyway.

    3- Eu estou adorando a chuva.

    Her nephew, André, uses an expression meaning - “I’m actually loving this rain.”
    Is André being nasty or is he just commenting on his preference of the weather?

    4- Que pena! Espero que consiga se divertir de outro jeito.

    Her supervisor, Paulo, uses an expression meaning - “What a pity! I hope you manage to have fun in other ways.”
    A nice comment to express sympathy and a well-wish.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • planejar: “to plan”
  • parque: “park”
  • sorte: “luck”
  • chuva: “rain”
  • lanche: “snack”
  • divertir: “to have fun”
  • jeito: “way”
  • How would you comment in Portuguese when a friend is disappointed?

    Not all posts need to be about a negative feeling, though!

    11. Talking about Your Relationship Status in Brazilian Portuguese

    Don’t just change your relationship status in Settings, talk about it!

    Eduardo changes his status to “In a relationship”, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eduardo’s post.

    Nunca fui tão feliz na vida. Te amo, Luiza.
    “I’ve never been so happy. I love you, Luiza.”

    1- Nunca fui tão feliz na vida.

    First is an expression meaning “I’ve never been so happy..”
    It’s extremely common to omit the subject eu (”I” ) in Portuguese. The subject is implied, though, and is treated like explicit ones - nunca fui could be eu nunca fui (”I’ve never been” ). Both are correct. tão feliz na vida means “so happy in my life.”

    2- Te amo, Luiza.

    Then comes the phrase - “I love you, Luiza..”
    “I love you.” Again, this is a case where the subject is implicit.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eduardo’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Também te amo, meu amor!

    His girlfriend, Luiza, uses an expression meaning - “I love you too, honey!”
    A sweet, loving comment.

    2- Finalmente! Já ia puxar a sua orelha.

    His girlfriend’s high school friend, Helena, uses an expression meaning - “Finally! I was about to chide you.”
    Helena has clearly been waiting for this to happen, and she’s happy about the relationship.

    3- A patroa vai ficar feliz!

    His college friend, Lucas, uses an expression meaning - “The missus will be pleased!”
    Lucas’ comment is fun and not serious. He’s joking a bit with the couple.

    4- Que lindos! Mas não é nenhuma novidade, né?

    His neighbor, Gabriela, uses an expression meaning - “How lovely! But it’s nothing new, right? ”
    Gabriela expresses her feelings of appreciation and also indicates that it didn’t come as a surprise.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • nunca: “never”
  • vida: “life”
  • amar: “to love”
  • orelha: “ear”
  • patroa: “missus; boss (female)”
  • novidade: “new, novelty”
  • amor: “love”
  • What would you say in Portuguese when a friend changes their relationship status?

    Being in a good relationship with someone special is good news - don’t be shy to spread it!

    12. Post about Getting Married in Brazilian Portuguese

    Wow, so things got serious, and you’re getting married. Congratulations! Or, your friend is getting married, so talk about this in Portuguese.

    Luiza is getting married today, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Luiza’s post.

    É hoje o grande dia! Estou muito feliz e ansiosa!
    “Today’s the big day! I’m very happy and very nervous!”

    1- É hoje o grande dia!

    First is an expression meaning “Today is the big day!.”
    It’s common to put adjectives before nouns, especially when emphasizing and/or giving a more poetic tone to the phrase. The same goes for putting the verb before the noun.

    2- Estou muito feliz e ansiosa!

    Then comes the phrase - “I’m very happy and nervous! .”
    The first part means “I’m very happy.” Ansiosa literally means “anxious,” and it’s used just like in English. But informally, it’s also used as “excited, nervous, eager, looking forward to, can’t wait.” So Luiza is happy and nervous; she can’t wait.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Luiza’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Não vejo a hora da cerimônia. Parabéns!

    Her neighbor, Gabriela, uses an expression meaning - “I’m looking forward to the ceremony. Congratulations!”
    A congratulatory, warmhearted comment.

    2- Você tem certeza que não vai chover?

    Her nephew, André, uses an expression meaning - “Are you sure it won’t rain?”
    André is clearly the worripot in the family.

    3- Você vai ser uma noiva linda, tenho certeza!

    Her husband’s high school friend, Lígia, uses an expression meaning - “You’ll be a beautiful bride, I’m sure!”
    Lígia compliments Luiza.

    4- Qual o horário da cerimônia mesmo?

    Her college friend, Lucas, uses an expression meaning - “What time is the ceremony taking place again?”
    Lucas is asking a question about the ceremony - one way to stay part of the conversation and get information.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • hoje: “today”
  • feliz: “happy”
  • ansioso: “anxious, nervous, excited”
  • cerimônia: “ceremony”
  • parabéns: “congratulations”
  • noiva: “bride”
  • grande: “big, great”
  • How would you respond in Portuguese to a friend’s post about getting married?

    For the next topic, fast forward about a year into the future after the marriage…

    13. Announcing Big News in Brazilian Portuguese

    Wow, huge stuff is happening in your life! Announce it in Portuguese.

    Eduardo finds out he and his wife are going to have a baby, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eduardo’s post.

    A família está crescendo. Nosso primeiro filho está a caminho!
    “Our family is getting bigger. Our first child is on the way!”

    1- A família está crescendo.

    First is an expression meaning “Our family is getting bigger..”
    It’s very common to refer to your family as “the family” in these situations. For instance, when saying to a friend, a família vai vir amanhã (”the family will come tomorrow” ), it means minha família (”my family” ). Crescendo can mean “getting bigger” or “growing”.

    2- Nosso primeiro filho está a caminho!

    Then comes the phrase - “Our first child is on the way!.”
    In Portuguese, there is no such thing as a gender-neutral class of nouns (in grammar, not meaning), such as “child” in English. When you want to generalize, you use the masculine form. So, whenever you don’t know the gender of a baby or child, you say filho (”son” ). Filha (”daughter” ) is only used when it’s certain or believed that the baby or kid is in fact a girl. Está a caminho means “on the way, on its way”.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eduardo’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Que alegria! Um filho é uma bênção. Parabéns, futuro papai.

    His supervisor, Paulo, uses an expression meaning - “What a joy! A child is a blessing. Congratulations, soon-to-be daddy.”
    Use this expression to be old fashioned.

    2- Que maravilha! Vocês já escolheram o nome?

    His high school friend, Lígia, uses an expression meaning - “How wonderful! Have you chosen the name already?”
    Lígia is happy about this announcement and curious about the baby’s name.

    3- Algo me diz que é uma menina!

    His wife, Luiza, uses an expression meaning - “Something tells me it’s a girl!”
    Luiza must be sensing something…

    4- Não acredito que você vai ser pai! Parabéns, meu chapa.

    His college friend, Lucas, uses an expression meaning - “I can’t believe you’re going to be a father! Congratulations, buddy.”
    Lucas is happy for his friend, and also a bit unbelieving.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • família: “family”
  • filho: “son, child”
  • alegria: “joy”
  • bênção: “blessing”
  • maravilha: “wonder; marvel”
  • pai, papai: “dad, daddy”
  • acreditar: “to believe”
  • Which phrase would you choose when a friend announces their pregnancy on social media?

    So, talking about a pregnancy will get you a lot of traction on social media. But wait till you see the responses to babies!

    14. Posting Brazilian Portuguese Comments about Your Baby

    Your bundle of joy is here, and you cannot keep quiet about it! Share your thoughts in Portuguese.

    Luiza plays with her baby, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Luiza’s post.

    Estou completamente apaixonada por esta pessoinha!
    “I’m head over heels in love with this little person!”

    1- Completamente apaixonada por

    First is an expression meaning “head over heels in love with.”
    Completamente apaixonada(o) is an emphatic way of saying you’re in love, like head over heels in love. Completamente is “completely”.

    2- esta pessoinha

    Then comes the phrase - “this little person.”
    It’s a very tender expression showing affection to a child or baby. In other contexts, however, it can be very pejorative, like calling someone small in attitude, a low person.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Luiza’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Posso roubar esta coisinha linda?

    Her high school friend, Helena, uses an expression meaning - “Can I steal this beautiful little thing?”
    This is Helena’s way of saying that the baby is both beautiful and adorable.

    2- Sou suspeito para falar, mas ela é linda mesmo.

    Her husband, Eduardo, uses an expression meaning - “I’m biased, but she really is beautiful.”
    Eduardo is also expressing his admiration for his daughter’s looks.

    3- Quanta fofura! Dá vontade de morder.

    Her neighbor, Gabriela, uses an expression meaning - “So much cuteness! She makes me want to bite her.”
    Gabriela is overcome with strong emotions of appreciation for the little one.

    4- Ela é muito linda. Venha ao escritório com ela qualquer dia destes.

    Her supervisor, Paulo, uses an expression meaning - “She is very beautiful. Bring her to the office one of these days.”
    Paolo is a pleasant, engaging supervisor who clearly takes interest in his colleagues’ personal lives.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • coisinha: “little thing”
  • fofura: “cuteness, fluffiness”
  • roubar: “to steal”
  • morder: “to bite”
  • escritório: “office”
  • suspeito: “suspect”
  • poder: “can”
  • vir: “to come”
  • If your friend is the mother or father, which phrase would you use on social media?

    Congratulations, you know the basics of chatting about a baby in Portuguese! But we’re not done with families yet…

    15. Brazilian Portuguese Comments about a Family Reunion

    Family reunions - some you love, some you hate. Share about it on your feed.

    Eduardo goes to a family gathering, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eduardo’s post.

    Um almoço em família é sempre muito bom!
    “Family lunch is always a very good thing!”

    1- almoço em família

    First is an expression meaning “family lunch.”
    “Lunch”, almoço, in Brazil, is usually a big event. For most families, it’s the most important meal, and generally the biggest one. So, family lunches are a big thing.

    2- é sempre muito bom

    Then comes the phrase - “is always a very good thing.”
    Sempre muito bom can be used in a lot of situations and subjects. Here, it’s the family lunch.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eduardo’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Que fique claro: eles me forçaram a sair na foto.

    His nephew, André, uses an expression meaning - “To make it clear: they forced me to be in this photo.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling cynical.

    2- Estava tudo tão bom! Pena que eu comi demais…

    His wife, Luiza, uses an expression meaning - “Everything was so good! Too bad I ate too much…”
    Luiza is expressing admiration for the tasty food, admitting that it was so good she overindulged.

    3- Que bom ter uma família grande e unida. Abraços.

    His supervisor, Paulo, uses an expression meaning - “How nice to have a big and united family. Hugs.”
    Perhaps a bit unimaginative and old-fashioned, this is nevertheless a nice comment.

    4- Foi por isso que você me deu bolo, então!

    His college friend, Lucas, uses an expression meaning - “That’s why you blew me off then!”
    Lucas understands now why they he and Eduardo were not able to get together.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • almoço: “lunch”
  • claro: “clear”
  • forçar: “to force”
  • grande: “big”
  • unido: “united”
  • dar um bolo: “to blow someone off”
  • ficar claro: “to make it clear”
  • tudo: “all, everything”
  • Which phrase is your favorite to comment on a friend’s photo about a family reunion?

    16. Post about Your Travel Plans in Brazilian Portuguese

    So, the family is going on holiday. Do you post and leave comments in Portuguese about being at the airport, waiting for a flight?

    Luiza waits at the airport for her flight, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Luiza’s post.

    O voo atrasou… aeroportos são tão chatos! Alguém online?
    “The flight was delayed… airports are so boring! Is anyone online?”

    1- O voo atrasou…

    First is an expression meaning “The flight was delayed….”
    Voo (”flight” ) was recently changed according to the Portuguese New Reform, which changed the rules of orthography to unite Portuguese-speaking countries. You may still see the spelling vôo, with a circumflex, but it’s out-dated.

    2- Aeroportos são tão chatos! Alguém online?

    Then comes the phrase - “Airports are so boring! Is anyone online?.”
    Chato can mean a lot of things: “dull, boring, annoying.” Literally, the word means “flat.” In this case, it’s a mix of boring and dull. So, aeroportos (”airports” ) are very dull and boring. Alguém online? means “is anyone online?”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Luiza’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Eu avisei para você baixar aquele jogo!

    Her husband, Eduardo, uses an expression meaning - “I told you to download that game!”
    Eduardo is making conversation with his wife.

    2- Se quiser conversar, estou aqui, querida!

    Her neighbor, Gabriela, uses an expression meaning - “If you want to chat, I’m here, darling!”
    Gabriela is being a good friend, offering to chat with Luiza to alleviate her boredom.

    3- Chato é não estar num aeroporto neste momento.

    Her nephew, André, uses an expression meaning - “Boring is not being in an airport at this moment.”
    André’s comment points out that Luiza is, after all, on her way to an exotic destination…

    4- Saia do celular e vá ler um livro!

    Her high school friend, Helena, uses an expression meaning - “Turn off your cell phone and go read a book!”
    Helena offers advice with this comment.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • voo: “flight”
  • jogo: “game”
  • aeroporto: “airport”
  • chato: “boring, dull, annoying, flat”
  • celular: “cell phone”
  • baixar: “to download”
  • livro: “book”
  • atrasar: “to delay”
  • Choose and memorize your best airport phrase in Portuguese!

    Hopefully the rest of the trip is better!

    17. Posting about an Interesting Find in Brazilian Portuguese

    So maybe you’re strolling around at your local market, and find something interesting. Here are some handy Portuguese phrases.

    Eduardo finds an unusual item at a local market, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eduardo’s post.

    Na feirinha, procurando óculos escuros, encontrei uma escultura igual à do meu falecido avô! Inacreditável!
    “At the fair, while looking for sunglasses, I found a sculpture that looks the same as my late grandfather’s! Unbelievable!”

    1- Na feirinha, procurando óculos escuros.

    First is an expression meaning “At the fair, while looking for sunglasses..”
    In Portuguese sometimes the diminutive is used for an unknown reason. In this case, it can mean “a small fair,” but it’s also used to indicate big fairs. It can be used in an affectionate way, but not necessarily. Sometimes, the use of a verb in the gerund form is good enough to replace “while doing something.” Procurando óculos de sol in this phrase means “while looking for sunglasses,” even though it doesn’t include enquanto (”while” ).

    2- Encontrei uma escultura igual à do meu falecido avô! Inacreditável!

    Then comes the phrase - “I found a sculpture that looks the same as my late grandfather’s! Unbelievable!”
    Sometimes people put adjectives in front of nouns to give the sentence a more poetic intonation. Falecido (”late, deceased” ) very commonly appears before the person who’s dead. But it’s not a rule, as it can come afterwards as well. Encontrei uma escultura igual à do meu falecido avô means “I found a sculpture that looks the same as my late grandfather’s.” Inacreditável! is used exactly like its English equivalent, “unbelievable!”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eduardo’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Estas feirinhas são incríveis! Nunca se sabe o que vai encontrar.

    His high school friend, Lígia, uses an expression meaning - “These fairs are amazing! You never know what you’ll find.”
    This is a comment of appreciation, and just to make talk.

    2- É no máximo parecida.

    His nephew, André, uses an expression meaning - “It’s similar at best.”
    Clearly, André is unimpressed with the fair.

    3- Parece coisa de filme!

    His wife, Luiza, uses an expression meaning - “It seems like something out of a movie!”
    Luiza is very amazed at the sights.

    4- Uau!

    His college friend, Lucas, uses an expression meaning - “Wow!”
    Lucas seems to feel rather astonished.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • óculos: “glasses”
  • escuro: “dark”
  • óculos escuros: “sunglasses”
  • escultura: “sculpture”
  • falecido: “deceased, late”
  • filme: “movie”
  • parecido: “similar”
  • avô: “grandfather”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s interesting find?

    Perhaps you will even learn the identity of your find! Or perhaps you’re on holiday, and visiting interesting places…

    18. Post about a Sightseeing Trip in Brazilian Portuguese

    Let your friends know what you’re up to in Portuguese, especially when visiting a remarkable place! Don’t forget the photo.

    Luiza visits a famous landmark, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Luiza’s post.

    Realizando o sonho de conhecer o Pelourinho!
    “Fulfilling my dream of going to the Pelourinho!”

    1- Realizando o sonho de conhecer

    First is an expression meaning “Fulfilling the dream of going to.”
    In Portuguese, when you first go someplace new, you say conhecer. That means “to know.” Estou conhecendo o Brasil - “I’m getting to know Brazil.” Não conheço o Rio de Janeiro - “I’ve never been to Rio de Janeiro.” So, the phrase means “fulfilling the dream of going to / getting to know”.

    2- o Pelourinho

    Then comes the phrase - “the Pelourinho.”
    Although Pelourinho means, literally, “pillory,” you don’t translate it as such in this case. It’s the name of a historical neighborhood in Salvador, the capital of Bahia, a Brazilian northeastern state. It is where a pillory used to be, and lots of slaves were punished there during colonial times. It’s a famous sight in Brazil.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Luiza’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Que legal, é um dos meus pontos turísticos favoritos!

    Her husband’s high school friend, Lígia, uses an expression meaning - “How cool; it’s one of my favorite sights!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling optimistic.

    2- Que viagem de trabalho chata! Só que não…

    Her high school friend, Helena, uses an expression meaning - “How annoying your work trip! Not…”
    Use this expression to be funny.

    3- E o maridão, foi junto?

    Her college friend, Lucas, uses an expression meaning - “What about your hubby? Did he come with you?”
    Lucas is curious about Eduardo’s whereabouts.

    4- Te encontro em alguns dias, minha linda! Estou com saudade.

    Her husband, Eduardo, uses an expression meaning - “I’ll meet you in a few days, my pretty! I miss you.”
    And hubby misses his wife.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • sonho: “dream”
  • só que não: “Not!” (as a joke, pun)
  • encontrar: “to meet”
  • junto: “along, together”
  • ponto turístico: “tourist attraction”
  • realizar: “to fulfill, to accomplish, to perform”
  • alguns: “some”
  • viagem: “trip”
  • Which phrase would you prefer when a friend posts about a famous landmark?

    Share your special places with the world. Or simply post about your relaxing experiences.

    19. Post about Relaxing Somewhere in Brazilian Portuguese

    So you’re doing nothing yet you enjoy that too? Tell your social media friends about it in Portuguese!

    Eduardo relaxes at a beautiful place, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eduardo’s post.

    Finalmente cheguei! Agora é só curtir.
    “I finally arrived! I’m just going to enjoy it now.”

    1- Finalmente cheguei! Agora é só

    First is an expression meaning “I finally arrived! Now it’s just.”
    The first part means “I finally arrived.” The subject is implicit. The second part, agora é só, is a very common informal expression. It’s similar to “now all you have to do is,” but short and simplified. You can’t say that about yourself, implying that there’s something you’re about to do, or about someone else, like on a guide. Example: Agora é só ligar o aparelho (”now you just have to turn the device on” ); Agora é só música boa (”now there’s just going to be good music” ). And so on.

    2- curtir

    Then comes the phrase - “enjoy, like, dig.”
    Curtir is a very popular slang that means “to like and / or to enjoy.” For instance, the like button on Facebook is the curtir button in Portuguese. You can use it for anything: Eu curto essa banda (”I like this band” ); Não curti o presente (”I didn’t dig the present” ).

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eduardo’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Que bom que está aproveitando. A Bahia é linda.

    His supervisor, Paulo, uses an expression meaning - “I’m glad you’re enjoying it. Bahia is beautiful.”
    A common expression, this is still a considerate and friendly thing to say.

    2- Não quero voltar pra casa!

    His wife, Luiza, uses an expression meaning - “I don’t want to go home!”
    Luiza is regretful that the trip will have to end at some point.

    3- Vocês vão ficar quanto tempo?

    His high school friend, Lígia, uses an expression meaning - “How long will you stay?”
    A question to keep the conversation going.

    4- Que trabalhão vocês estão tendo…

    His nephew, André, uses an expression meaning - “That’s a lot of work for you guys…”

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • curtir: “to like, to dig, to enjoy”
  • aproveitar: “to enjoy”
  • voltar: “to come back”
  • chegar: “to arrive”
  • casa: “home, house”
  • pra: “to, for”
  • que bom: “I’m glad, how good”
  • querer: “to want”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s feed?

    The break was great, but now it’s time to return home.

    20. What to Say in Brazilian Portuguese When You’re Home Again

    And you’re back! What will you share with friends and followers?

    Luiza returns home after the vacation, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Luiza’s post.

    Chegando em casa nesse momento… posso voltar no tempo?
    “Arriving home right now… can I go back in time?”

    1- Chegando em casa nesse momento…

    First is an expression meaning “Arriving home right now.”
    Chegando means “arriving.” Em casa means “at home.” But the word casa can also mean “house,” the solid building itself. You have to understand the context. Nesse momento means “right now”.

    2- posso voltar no tempo?

    Then comes the phrase - “can I go back in time?.”
    A grammar recap: the subject eu (”I” ) is implicit; posso (”can” ) is first person singular present indicative, which confirms it. Sometimes, especially on the internet, people may say pode voltar as slang - pode is first or third person singular. Technically, this is wrong, but it’s slang among youngsters.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Luiza’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Depressão pós-viagem? Sei como é!

    Her high school friend, Helena, uses an expression meaning - “Post-trip depression? Been there!”
    Helena expresses her understanding of Luiza’s feelings.

    2- Bem-vinda de volta!

    Her supervisor, Paulo, uses an expression meaning - “Welcome back!”
    An old-fashioned comment, but still good.

    3- O prédio ficou vazio sem vocês.

    Her neighbor, Gabriela, uses an expression meaning - “The building was so empty without you guys.”
    A lovely, warm-hearted welcome from Gabriela.

    4- A viagem foi boa, mas estou feliz em ter voltado.

    Her husband, Eduardo, uses an expression meaning - “The trip was good, but I’m happy to be back.”
    Eduardo clearly enjoyed the trip, but home is best for him.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • chegar: “to arrive”
  • momento: “moment”
  • depressão: “depression”
  • prédio: “building”
  • vazio: “empty”
  • tempo: “time”
  • mas: “but”
  • bom: “good, nice”
  • How would you welcome a friend back from a trip?

    What do you post on social media during a special event, such as the Carnaval parade in Portugese?

    21. It’s Time to Celebrate in Brazilian Portuguese

    It’s an historic day and you wish to post something about it on social media. What would you say?

    Eduardo watches the Carnaval parade, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eduardo’s post.

    Ganhei um ingresso VIP! Alguém por aqui no sambódromo?
    “I won a VIP ticket! Anyone here in the Sambadrome?”

    1- Ganhei um ingresso VIP!

    First is an expression meaning “I won a VIP ticket!.”
    In Brazil, the VIP concept and the abbreviation are the same as in English. The difference is that it isn’t pronounced as three independent letters. Instead, you say it as a whole word: approximately, “veeh-pee.” The whole phrase means “I won a VIP ticket.”

    2- Alguém por aqui no sambódromo?

    Then comes the phrase - “Anyone here in the Sambadrome?.”
    Alguém por aqui is a less formal simplification of tem alguém por aqui? (”is there, is someone” ). It’s common to suppress tem (”is there” ). Por aqui means “around, close-by.” Sambódromo is the sambadrome, where the Carnaval parade takes place. Just like cars have autodromes, samba has the sambadrome.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eduardo’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Como você não me levou?

    His college friend, Lucas, uses an expression meaning - “How could you not take me?”
    Lucas is being humorous, expressing his disappointment in a joking way.

    2- Ingresso VIP sem acompanhante, fala sério.

    His wife, Luiza, uses an expression meaning - “VIP ticket without a plus one, seriously?”
    Luiza is more to the point about her exclusion from the event.

    3- Cuidado para não ficar surdo.

    His nephew, André, uses an expression meaning - “Be careful not to go deaf.”
    André gives wry and perhaps even apt advice.

    4- Eu e a Luiza estamos a caminho do bloco de rua, seu esnobe!

    His wife’s high school friend, Helena, uses an expression meaning - “Luiza and I are on the way to the street carnaval block, you snob!”
    Use this expression to be funny.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • ganhar: “to win”
  • levar: “to take, to lead, to bring”
  • acompanhante: “companion, company, plus one”
  • fala sério: “seriously?, for real?”
  • cuidado: “careful, watch out, caution”
  • esnobe: “snob”
  • bloco de rua: “street carnaval block”
  • surdo: “deaf”
  • If a friend posted something about a holiday, which phrase would you use?

    But Carnaval Parade days are not the only special ones to remember!

    22. Posting about a Birthday on Social Media in Brazilian Portuguese

    Your friend or you are celebrating your birthday in an unexpected way. Be sure to share this on social media!

    Luiza goes to her birthday party, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Luiza’s post.

    Os melhores amigos são aqueles que te dão uma festa surpresa! Obrigada, gente!
    “The best friends are those who throw you a surprise party! Thank you, guys!”

    1- Os melhores amigos são aqueles que te dão uma festa surpresa!

    First is an expression meaning “The best friends are those who throw you a surprise party!.”
    The phrase os melhores amigos são aqueles que literally means “the best friends are those who/that”. In Portuguese, the concept of throwing a party is expressed with the verb dar, “to give.” Even if you throw a party for yourself, you’re giving it. It expresses how Brazilians understand and enjoy parties.

    2- Obrigada, gente!

    Then comes the phrase - “Thank you, guys!.”
    Remember that obrigada is for females, while obrigado is for males. Gente, originally, means “people.” But it’s also used just like pessoal, galera: it means “guys, folks, gang,” etc. Que gente legal! (”Such nice people” ); Gente, eu tenho uma ideia. (”Guys, I have an idea.” ).

    COMMENTS

    In response, Luiza’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Fizemos com muito carinho!

    Her neighbor, Gabriela, uses an expression meaning - “We did it with love!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling warmhearted.

    2- Você precisava ver a sua cara!

    Her high school friend, Helena, uses an expression meaning - “You should’ve seen your face!”
    Helena is joking with Luiza about her facial expression.

    3- Quem fez o bolo? Estava bom demais!

    Her college friend, Lucas, uses an expression meaning - “Who made the cake? It was really good!”
    Lucas is appreciative of the birthday cake.

    4- Você merece, parabéns!

    Her husband’s high school friend, Lígia, uses an expression meaning - “You deserve it, congratulations!”
    Lígia makes a sweet congratulatory remark.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • amigo: “friend”
  • aquele: “those”
  • surpresa: “surprise”
  • bolo: “cake”
  • bom demais: “really good, too good”
  • merecer: “to deserve”
  • cara: “face”
  • If a friend posted something about birthday greetings, which phrase would you use?

    23. Talking about New Year on Social Media in Brazilian Portuguese

    Impress your friend with your Portuguese New Year’s wishes this year. Learn the phrases easily!

    Eduardo celebrates the New Year, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eduardo’s post.

    Adeus ano velho, feliz Ano-Novo! Pode vir quente que eu estou fervendo!
    “Goodbye, old year; happy new year! You can come hotly, because I’m boiling!”

    1- Adeus ano velho, feliz Ano-Novo!

    First is an expression meaning “Goodbye, old year; happy new year! .”
    This is an expression derived from a Brazilian song from the 50s. It’s sung at New Year’s Eve parties, welcoming the new year. It’s been the new year hymn in Brazil for a long time.

    2- Pode vir quente que eu estou fervendo!

    Then comes the phrase - “You can come hotly, because I’m boiling!.”
    It’s an expression derived from another song with the same name. It means “I can take it,” “you can come, I’m stronger,” “if you’re mad, I’m madder,” “I’m ready,” and so on.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eduardo’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Fervendo ou derretendo neste calor?

    His nephew, André, uses an expression meaning - “Boiling or melting in this heat?”

    2- Este ano promete!

    His high school friend, Lígia, uses an expression meaning - “This year is promising!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling optimistic about the New Year.

    3- Vamos manter nossas resoluções!

    His wife, Luiza, uses an expression meaning - “Let’s stick to our resolutions!”
    Luiza is encouraging everyone to stick to their resolutions.

    4- O Réveillon parece ter sido ótimo!

    His neighbor, Gabriela, uses an expression meaning - “The New Year’s Eve party seems to have been great!”
    Gabriela comments on the party.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • adeus: “goodbye”
  • velho: “old”
  • ferver: “to boil”
  • quente: “hot”
  • derreter: “to melt”
  • prometer: “to promise”
  • Réveillon: “New Year’s Eve”
  • calor: “heat”
  • Which is your favorite phrase to post on social media during New Year?

    But before New Year’s Day comes another important day…

    24. What to Post on Christmas Day in Brazilian Portuguese

    What will you say in Portuguese about Christmas?

    Luiza celebrates Christmas with her family, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Luiza’s post.

    Hoje, ceia com a minha família. Amanhã, almoço com os sogros. Feliz Natal a todos!
    “Today, supper with my family. Tomorrow, lunch with the in-laws. Merry Christmas to all!”

    1- Hoje, ceia com a minha família.

    First is an expression meaning “Today, supper with my family..”
    In Brazil, Christmas is celebrated more often, and more importantly, on ChrIstmas Eve. People stay awake and eat late, thus supper. When the clock turns to midnight, they all celebrate and exchange presents.

    2- Amanhã, almoço com os sogros. Feliz Natal a todos!

    Then comes the phrase - “Tomorrow, lunch with the in-laws. Merry Christmas to all!.”
    On the 25th of December, families usually gather for lunch, typically eating what’s left of supper. There’s usually a lot of food, as Brazilian celebratory meals are huge. It can also last for days after Christmas! The last part means “Merry Christmas to all!”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Luiza’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Almoço com meus avós? Você tá de castigo?

    Her nephew, André, uses an expression meaning - “Lunch with my grandparents? Are you grounded?”
    André has a very dry sense of humor.

    2- A ceia estava uma delícia! Espero que sobre espaço para o almoço!

    Her husband, Eduardo, uses an expression meaning - “Supper was delicious! I hope there will be room for lunch!”
    Eduardo has clearly enjoyed supper.

    3- Você sempre vira uma criança no Natal!

    Her high school friend, Helena, uses an expression meaning - “You always turn into a kid on Christmas!”
    Helena partakes in the conversation with a good-natured tease.

    4- Vocês trocaram presentes? Feliz Natal pra você também!

    Her neighbor, Gabriela, uses an expression meaning - “Did you exchange gifts? Merry Christmas to you, too!”
    Gabriela offers a warmhearted well-wish and asks a question to show interest in the topic.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • hoje: “today”
  • ceia: “supper”
  • amanhã: “tomorrow”
  • sogros: “the in-laws”
  • natal: “Christmas”
  • de castigo: “grounded”
  • trocar: “to exchange”
  • delícia: “delicious thing”
  • If a friend posted something about Christmas greetings, which phrase would you use?

    So, the festive season is over! Yet, there will always be other days, besides a birthday, to wish someone well.

    25. Post about Your Anniversary in Brazilian Portuguese

    Some things deserve to be celebrated, like wedding anniversaries. Learn which Portuguese phrases are meaningful and best suited for this purpose!

    Eduardo celebrates his wedding anniversary with his wife, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eduardo’s post.

    Um ano de casado. Que venham muitos mais! Te amo, Luiza.
    “One year of marriage. Let there be many more! I love you, Luiza.”

    1- Um ano de casado.

    First is an expression meaning “One year of marriage..”
    Whenever you’re counting years of marriage, you don’t say casamento (”marriage” ), like in English. You’re counting the time you have as a married person; so, you should use casado, which means “married.”

    2- Que venham muitos mais! Te amo, Luiza.

    Then comes the phrase - “Let there be many more! I love you, Luiza..”
    This is a common expression used to express courage or satisfaction, similar to English. Think of it as a fixed expression, and not grammatically, as it may be confusing at this stage. Te amo, Luiza. means “I love you, Luiza.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eduardo’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Com você o tempo passa voando! Também te amo, lindo.

    His wife, Luiza, uses an expression meaning - “Time flies when I’m with you! I love you too, honey.”
    Luiza returns Eduardo’s heartfelt sentiments about their marriage.

    2- Parece que foi ontem que vocês casaram!

    His neighbor, Gabriela, uses an expression meaning - “It seems like yesterday that you got married!”
    Gabriela is amazed at how time flew.

    3- Cara, quem diria? Parabéns, irmão!

    His college friend, Lucas, uses an expression meaning - “Man, who would say? Congratulations, my brother!”
    Lucas is making fun of Eduardo in a friendly way.

    4- Vocês são um casal lindo! Muitas felicidades!

    His high school friend, Lígia, uses an expression meaning - “You guys are a beautiful couple! Best wishes!”
    Lígia expresses appreciation and gives a well wish.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • felicidades: “cheers, best wishes”
  • passar: “to go, to pass”
  • voar: “to fly”
  • ontem: “yesterday”
  • cara: “dude, man”
  • dizer: “to say”
  • irmão: “brother, bro”
  • casal: “a married couple, a couple”
  • If a friend posted something about Anniversary greetings, which phrase would you use?

    Conclusion

    Learning to speak a new language will always be easier once you know key phrases that everybody uses. These would include commonly used expressions for congratulations and best wishes, etc.

    Master these in fun ways with Learn Portuguese! We offer a variety of tools to individualize your learning experience, including using cell phone apps, audiobooks, iBooks and many more. Never wonder again what to say on social media!

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    Learn 4 tools and techniques to stop translating in your head and start thinking in Portuguese

    Going through Portuguese lessons is enough to get by and learn the basics of Portuguese, but to truly become fluent you need to be able to think in Portuguese. This will allow you to have conversations with ease, read smoothly, and comprehensively understand natives. To do this, you need to go beyond just completing daily or weekly lessons.

    We naturally translate in our heads because it’s viewed as the easiest way to learn the definitions needed when learning a language. This way of learning can actually hinder your skills and fluency later on. If your brain has to make neural connections between the word you’re learning, what it means in your native tongue, and the physical object the connection will not be nearly as strong. When you bypass the original translation between Portuguese and your native language then there is a more basic and strong connection between just the Portuguese vocabulary word and the tangible object.

    start thinking in Portuguese

    In this blog post, you will learn the 4 important techniques to easily and naturally begin to speculate about the daily occurrences in your life. The best part is all of these techniques are supported and can be achieved through PortuguesePod101.com.

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    1. Surround yourself with Portuguese

    Surround Yourself

    By surrounding yourself with Portuguese constantly you will completely immerse yourself in the language. Without realizing it you’ll be learning pronunciation, sentence structures, grammar, and new vocabulary. You can play music in the background while you’re cooking or have a Portuguese radio station on while you study. Immersion is a key factor with this learning process because it is one of the easiest things to do, but very effective. Even if you are not giving the program your full attention you will be learning.

    One great feature of PortuguesePod101.com is the endless podcasts that are available to you. You can even download and listen to them on the go. These podcasts are interesting and are perfect for the intention of immersion, they are easy to listen to as background noise and are interesting enough to give your full attention. Many of them contain stories that you follow as you go through the lessons which push you to keep going.

    2. Learn through observation
    learn through observation

    Learning through observation is the most natural way to learn. Observation is how we all learned our native languages as infants and it’s a wonder why we stop learning this way. If you have patience and learn through observation then Portuguese words will have their own meanings rather than meanings in reference to your native language. Ideally, you should skip the bilingual dictionary and just buy a dictionary in Portuguese.

    PortuguesePod101.com also offers the materials to learn this way. We have numerous video lessons which present situational usage of each word or phrase instead of just a direct translation. This holds true for many of our videos and how we teach Portuguese.

    3. Speak out loud to yourself
    talk to yourself

    Speaking to yourself in Portuguese not only gets you in the mindset of Portuguese, but also makes you listen to how you speak. It forces you to correct any errors with pronunciation and makes it easy to spot grammar mistakes. When you speak out loud talk about what you did that day and what you plan to do the next day. Your goal is to be the most comfortable speaking out loud and to easily create sentences. Once you feel comfortable talking to yourself start consciously thinking in your head about your daily activities and what is going on around you throughout the day.

    With PortuguesePod101.com you start speaking right away, not only this, but they have you repeat words and conversations after a native Portuguese speaker. This makes your pronunciation very accurate! With this help, you are on the fast path to making clear and complex sentences and then actively thinking about your day.

    4. Practice daily

    If you don’t practice daily then your progress will be greatly slowed. Many people are tempted to take the 20-30 minutes they should be practicing a day and practice 120 in one day and skip the other days. This isn’t nearly as effective because everyday you practice you are reinforcing the skills and knowledge you have learned. If you practice all in one day you don’t retain the information because the brain can realistically only focus for 30 minutes at most. If you’re studying for 120 minutes on the same subject little of the information will be absorbed. Studying everyday allows you to review material that you went over previous days and absorb a small amount of information at a time.

    It’s tough to find motivation to study everyday, but PortuguesePod101.com can help. It’s easy to stay motivated with PortuguesePod101.com because we give you a set learning path, with this path we show how much progress you’ve made. This makes you stick to your goals and keep going!

    Conclusion

    Following the steps and having patience is the hardest part to achieving your goals, it’s not easy learning a new language. You are essentially teaching your brain to categorize the world in a completely new way. Stick with it and you can do it just remember the 4 tools I taught you today! With them, conversations, reading, and understanding will become much easier. The most important thing to remember is to use the tools that PortuguesePod101.com provides and you will be on your way to being fluent!

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    4 Reasons Why Portuguese Slang Words Will Make You Fluent

    Learn 4 honest reasons you need Portuguese slang words and why they are so vital to truly learning and mastering the language.

    Teachers may normally cringe at the thought of their students learning Portuguese slang words. After all, slang words and phrases are typically defined as being grammatically incorrect. So why would your teacher want you to spend time learning the “wrong way” to speak Portuguese? Here are 4 of the top reasons why you should study slang words and expressions when learning Portuguese or any new language.

    reasons to learn portuguese slang words

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    1. Native Speakers Use Slang Expressions in Everyday Conversation

    If you are going to study a foreign language and plan to use it to speak with native speakers, then you have to learn slang words and expressions. Otherwise, just using formal expressions and grammar may alienate you from native speakers and make it more difficult to establish a real connection. So it is best to at least learn some common slang words and expressions if you’re planning to meet or speak socially with someone.

    2. Slang Words Are Used All Throughout Portuguese Culture

    If you turn on any popular Portuguese TV show, listen to any song, or watch any movie, you are quickly going to see the value of learning Portuguese slang phrases. Just like everyday conversations between native speakers, Portuguese culture is filled with slang phrases and expressions. Without at least some knowledge of the more common slang phrases, popular culture and most conversations will be very confusing and potentially alienating.

    Want to Amaze Native Speaker? Be a Good Lover? Our Vocabulary Lists are Made for You!

    3. Slang Expressions Help You Better Express Your True Thoughts and Feelings

    Only relying on formal grammar and vocabulary is very limiting, especially in social situations. Just like in your native language, using the appropriate Portuguese slang words can help you express a broader range of emotions, thoughts, and feelings.

    4. Proper Use of Slang Makes You Sound More Natural

    We’ve all met foreigners who technically used formal language perfectly but still sounded odd and well….foreign. But when you use the right slang words and expressions, you will sound more natural and like a true native speaker. If you notice, even most politicians include a sprinkling of slang expressions and words throughout their speeches to help them sound more natural and to better connect with the audience.

    The Dark Side of Slang Expressions

    Learning Portuguese slang words can indeed help you sound more natural, better understand the people and culture, and make integration much easier. However, there is a dark side: using the wrong slang expressions can also make you look foolish, uneducated, and potentially disrespectful.

    But how do you know which slang words or phrases to use and when?

    The truth is that you can’t learn the most modern and appropriate slang words in textbooks or formal classroom settings. By the time the information gets incorporated into a formal curriculum, it’s already outdated and no longer in use by actual Portuguese people. And while you can learn current slang expressions from Portuguese TV shows, movies, songs, and games, you may not understand the context. If that happens, you may use the right Portuguese slang words but in the wrong situation and still look like a fool or possibly even offend someone.

    Step out from the darkness and Get Your FREE PDF eBook to Start Learning Portuguese!

    So where can you learn current slang expressions and the right context in which to use them?

    At PortuguesePod101, native speaking instructors create audio and video lessons that can include slang expressions and words. Our instructors provide context and examples for all the Portuguese slang words used in any lesson to make sure students understand the right time and place to use them.

    Portuguese slang words and expressions may be grammatically incorrect but they are vital to truly understanding and immersing yourself in the culture. In fact, it will be very difficult to fully understand any movie, TV show, song, game, or even 1-on-1 conversation without knowing a few of the more common slang expressions.

    However, it is important to learn the proper context and use of even popular slang expressions or you may come across as confusing, disrespectful, or uneducated.
    At PortuguesePod101, you’ll learn how to use slang phrases and words to draw the right attention and avoid these problems.

    Don’t forget to sign up for a Free Lifetime Account on PortuguesePod101.com to access tons of FREE lessons and features to become fluent in Portuguese!

    How to Learn Portuguese in Your Car?

    How to Learn Portuguese in Your Car? Learn language in car

    Stuck in traffic? Losing time in your car? Have you ever felt that in all this wasted time, you could have watched the 750 episodes of One Piece, finished the last Super Mario ten times, or even better…you could have learned Portuguese? Between family, friends and work, in addition to this time-consuming commute, it can become difficult to find time to properly learn Portuguese.

    Fortunately, every problem has a solution, and what could be a better solution than turning that commute time into learning time? Stop passing the time mindlessly listening to the radio and try some of our best tips for mastering Portuguese in your car!

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    Click Here To Start Learning Portuguese Right Now!

    You can learn Portuguese in your car, hands free
    While driving, it’s important that you keep your focus on the road, so this is why our top tips won’t require you to use your hands!

    Listening to Portuguese audio content in the car is a good way to learn
    This is because it is a fun and efficient way to learn. With PortuguesePod101.com podcasts, you will be able to discover Portuguese culture through topics about everyday life. Instead of the radio, listen to a Portuguese podcast adapted to your level, from Absolute Beginner to Advanced, and you will make progress sooner that you would expect!

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    You can listen to Portuguese music in the car
    Did you know that you can learn Portuguese by singing while driving? Listen to songs from cartoon or drama and try to identify some words you learned.

    Challenge yourself! Use the Portuguese you’ve studied up to this point and see how much you understand! Making the jump to real-life Portuguese is a scary one, but friendly children’s songs are a great place to start!

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    You can learn alone in your car
    When you’re driving alone, you can be as loud as you want – there is nothing better for remembering your Portuguese lessons than repeating loudly, again and again. Next time you see a driver who seems to be talking alone, you will know he or she is just learning Portuguese!

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    You can learn through repetition with your passengers
    If there are passengers in the car, it can be more stimulating to learn together. You can set a role play with Portuguese dialogues. With PortuguesePod101.com, you can download all the lessons transcript including the dialogues, as a PDF. Print it out and have some fun speaking in Portuguese!

    One of the passengers can answer the quiz available on each of our lessons, while another can correct that person. Listening to someone at a more advanced level of Portuguese or a better accent is positive and helps you improve.

    You can learn Portuguese offline
    Do you have a poor connection or are unable to use the Internet? It’s not a problem for learning Portuguese! Before you start your commute, use our App to download the lessons you want to study and the podcast you want to listen to in your car, and you will be able to enjoy your lessons offline. Entering a tunnel won’t be a problem anymore. What a pleasure to listen to audio content without having the host freezing every 5 seconds!

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    Click here to download the App and learn offline!

    You can learn every day at your own pace
    One of the best approaches for learning a language is little by little and often. It’s not efficient to take in a huge amount of information at one time. What you need is to study on a regular basis – a little bit of Portuguese every day. You commute several days a week, and that is all time you can take advantage of!

    You have the freedom to choose the lessons and podcasts you want to focus on, at your own rhythm. You may want to do a little revision or discover how to talk about a new topic. And if you’re wondering what to learn next, you can use the new Learning Paths, which is our customized pathway feature that gives you a step-by-step way to learn Portuguese without getting lost!

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    Click here to access Learning Paths at PortuguesePod101!

    If you don’t have a car and commute by another method, these tips are still valid! Learning Portuguese is no longer limited to the classroom or your house; there are so many benefits to learning in your car or elsewhere. Reaching a conversational level will take you less time than you could ever have imagined! Don’t forget to sign up for your Free Lifetime Account and enjoy our content!

    10 Monthly Goals to become fluent in Portuguese

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    Hey Portuguese Learner!

    Shortcuts for learning and tips to remember Portuguese words are useful but it’s even also important to fix objectives to reach every month! What Is Your Language Learning Goal for the Month?
    In your journey to become fluent and conversational here are 10 monthly goals you can go after!

    Click Here To Start Learning Portuguese Right Now!

    1) I’ll finish Survival Phrases series on PortuguesePod101.com by listening to two lesson a day.

    2) I’ll give a 3 minute introductory speech in Portuguese to my Portuguese friends.

    3) I’ll finish reading one Portuguese book by reading 10 pages a day.

    4) I’ll pass my Portuguese test.

    5) I’ll write 10 postcards in Portuguese to my Portuguese friends.

    6) I’ll memorize 5 Portuguese songs.

    7) I’ll finish memorizing 350 words with Flashcards on PortuguesePod101.com.

    8 ) I’ll fully understand one Portuguese movie by watching it every day.

    9) I’ll learn how to talk about past, present and future events.

    10) I’ll master 150 words by memorizing 5 words a day.

    No money, no credit card required, just you and the ton of lessons!

    If you follow those monthly goals, you will be sure to make some amazing progress. And remember, if you’re really interested in getting on the fast-track to fluency, sign up for a FREE lifetime account at PortuguesePod101.com!