PortuguesePod101.com Blog
Learn Portuguese with Free Daily
Audio and Video Lessons!
Start Your Free Trial 6 FREE Features

Archive for the 'Portuguese Language' Category

How to Say Sorry in Portuguese

Thumbnail

Learn how to apologize in Portuguese – fast and accurately! PortuguesePod101 makes it easy for you to make amends. Start with a bonus, and download your FREE cheat sheet – How to Improve Your Portuguese Skills! (Logged-In Member Only)

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Portuguese

Table of Contents

  1. Common Ways to Say Sorry in Portuguese
  2. How To Refuse Something Politely in Portuguese
  3. Audio Lesson – Survival Phrases “How to Say Sorry”
  4. Why You Will NOT Be Sorry For Learning Portuguese through PortuguesePod101

1. Common Ways to Say Sorry in Portuguese

3 Ways to Say Sorry

Nobody’s perfect, not anywhere in the world. Everybody makes mistakes, and does and says regrettable things. Then it’s time to apologize, as saying ‘I’m sorry’ is not in vain. It can be very healing! Did you know that hearing a sincerely-meant apology can have a noticeable effect on a person’s body? Research has shown that it slows down breathing and heart rate, and even causes a drop in blood pressure.

Sometimes we cannot fix what’s broken, but we can make the experience a bit easier for anyone who suffered on account of our thoughtless actions or words.

Here are a number of ways to say sorry in Portuguese. In any language, just make sure you really mean it! An insincere apology will not go down well with anyone.

Woman Apologizing

Desculpa.
I’m sorry

These words should precede anything else you have to say. Use them sincerely and whenever you are clearly in the wrong. Acknowledging your guilt and apologizing for any wrongdoing will lift your spirits too! Often, remorse can eat away at us, and a simple ‘I’m sorry’, in Portuguese or any other language, can open the door for forgiveness and resolution of a bad situation. It can be a true gift!

Eu gostaria de me desculpar.
I would like to apologize.

This is a slightly more formal way to say ‘I’m sorry’ in Portuguese. Use this phrase if you’re addressing your superiors and/or elders.

Eu peço desculpas de coração.
I sincerely apologize.

If you feel strongly about your apology, this is another slightly more formal phrase to use. Keep it handy for graver errors, or you might come across as insincere!

Eu não vou mais fazer isso.
I won’t do it again.

A promise you can only make if you intend to keep it! Few things feel as bad as having to hear repeated apologies from someone for the same behavior – it means the ‘sorry’ is not sincere. Don’t be that person!

Eu vou me assegurar de não cometer este erro de novo.
I’ll make sure not to make this mistake again.

A beautifully strong phrase! Again, say this only if you mean it – not just in the moment, but always! A bit more formal, this is an especially good phrase to use when apologizing to superiors and/or elders. It will make an especially good impression at the workplace, where accountability is an excellent quality to display!

Eu não quis dizer isso.
I didn’t mean that.

This is a tricky one… What did you mean, then?! Clear up any confusion with sincerity. Also, use this phrase only if the harm done or mistake made was due to an accident, and then admit to thoughtlessness on your part, if appropriate.

É minha culpa.
It’s my fault.

If the fault is really yours, own up to it. You will gain respect in the eyes of others! However, don’t take the blame when it’s not truly yours. It won’t be good for you, and ultimately you will not be respected much for it.

Desculpa por ter sido egoísta.
I’m sorry for being selfish.

This is a good phrase to keep handy, especially for your close relationships. It is difficult to admit you’re selfish, isn’t it?! However, it’s good to know when to be honest. We get used to our loved ones, which often means we forget that they need our good manners and unselfish behavior just as much as strangers do.

Eu espero que você me perdoe.
I hope you will forgive me.

This is a polite and gentle wish that can smooth over many harsh feelings. It also shows that the other person’s opinion and forgiveness are important to you.

Eu assumo toda a responsabilidade.
I take full responsibility.

This strong statement is similar to admitting that an error or transgression was your fault. It speaks of courage and the willingness to take remedial action. Good one to use…if you mean it!

Eu não deveria ter feito isso.
I shouldn’t have done it.

This phrase is fine to use if you did or said something wrong. It shows, to an extent, your regret for having done or said what you did, and demonstrates that you understand your role in the mistake.

Desculpa por devolver o seu dinheiro atrasado.
Sorry for giving your money back late.

It’s rotten to have to loan money! Yet, it’s equally rotten to have to ask for the repayment of a loan. So, do your best not to pay late in the first place, but if it can’t be helped, this would be a good phrase to use!

Por favor, não fica bravo comigo.
Please don’t be mad at me.

Well, this is not a very advisable phrase to use if you are clearly in the wrong. If someone is justifiably angry with you, asking them not to be mad at you would be an unfair expectation. However, if you did something wrong by accident, and if the consequences were not too serious, this request would be OK.

Desculpa por chegar atrasada.
Sorry I’m late.

Punctuality is valued in most situations, but if you really cannot help being late, then apologize! This way you show respect for your host, and win their approval.

Peço desculpas por ter sido malvada com você.
I apologize for being mean to you.

Acknowledging your own meanness towards someone is no small thing, so good for you! Use this apology only if your intention is to seriously address your mean tendencies, or these words could become meaningless over time.

2. How To Refuse Something Politely in Portuguese

Woman Refusing

Congratulations! Now you know how to apologize in Portuguese! After you have apologized for a mistake, focus on fixing whatever you can, and don’t punish yourself over something that cannot be taken back or reversed. That’s healthy for you! Regret can eat away at the soul, and even destroy it. It is ultimately a useless emotion if it consumes you.

However, in language, we use apologies not only when we’ve transgressed or made mistakes. They come in handy in other situations too, when there has been no wrongdoing. Sometimes we need to express regret for having to refuse a gift, an offer, or an invitation. This can be somewhat tricky. Learn from specialists at PortuguesePod101 about how to use the correct Portuguese words for this kind of ‘sorry’!

3. Survival Phrases “How to Say Sorry”

Say Sorry

On the run and need a quick lesson on how to say sorry in Portuguese? Don’t fret, just listen and repeat! Click here for a recorded short lesson and learn how to give the perfect apology, with perfect pronunciation in Portuguese. A little can go a long way, and you will sound like a native!

4. Why You Will NOT Be Sorry For Learning Portuguese through PortuguesePod101

Man Looking at Computer

Online learning is here to stay, that’s a fact. In 2015, the Digital Learning Compass Partnership released a report based on surveys to determine online enrollment trends in US institutions for higher education. Thirty percent of all their students learned online! And the number is growing! However, how can you be sure you will not regret your choice of an online language learning school? First, look at the school’s credentials and what it has to offer…

  • Fun and Easy Learning: It’s a commonly-known fact that when learning is made easy and fun, student motivation rises. And as motivation rises, so does the effort to learn – what a beautiful cycle! PortuguesePod101’s language learning system is designed to get you speaking from the onset. Learn at your own convenience and pace with our short, effective and fun audio podcast lessons. Our Learning Center is comprehensive and state-of-the-art, with a vibrant user community to connect to! Our lessons are recorded with native hosts and voice actors, providing a diverse range of dialects in your lessons. You can be confident that native speakers will understand you when speaking Portuguese!
  • Innovative Learning Tools and Apps: We make it our priority to offer you the best learning tools! These include apps for iPhone, iPad, Android and Mac OSX; eBooks for Kindle, Nook, and iPad; audiobooks; Roku TV and so many more. This means that we took diverse lifestyles into account when we developed our courses, so you can learn anywhere, anytime on a device of your choice. How innovative!
  • Free Resources: Sharing is caring, and for this reason, we share many free resources with our students. For instance, start learning Portuguese with our basic online course by creating a lifetime account – for free! Also get free daily and iTunes lessons, free eBooks, free mobile apps, and free access to our blog and online community. Or how about free Vocabulary Lists? The Portuguese dictionary is for exclusive use by our students, also for free. There’s so much to love about PortuguesePod101…!
  • Live Hosts and One-on-One Learning: Knowledgeable, energetic hosts present recorded video lessons, and are available for live teaching experiences if you upgrade. This means that in the videos, you get to watch them pronounce those tongue-twisters, as if you’re learning live! Add octane to your learning by upgrading to Premium Plus, and learn two times faster. Your can have your very own Portuguese teacher always with you, ensuring that you learn what you need, when you need to – what a wonderful opportunity to master a new language in record time!
  • Start Where You Are: You don’t know a single Portuguese word? Not to worry, we’ve absolutely got this. Simply enroll in our Absolute Beginner Pathway and start speaking from Lesson 1! As your learning progresses, you can enroll in other pathways to match your Portuguese level, at your own pace, in your own time, in your own place!

After this lesson, you will know almost every ‘sorry for’ in Portuguese, but don’t let it be that you’re sorry for missing a great opportunity. Learning a new language can only enrich your life, and could even open doors towards great opportunities! So don’t wonder if you’ll regret enrolling in PortuguesePod101. It’s the most fun, easy way to learn Portuguese!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Portuguese

Step Up Your Texting Game: A Guide to Portuguese Slang

Thumbnail

Did you know that Brazil is the country with the fourth-largest number of Internet users in the world? Take that huge number of people online, add to it the natural creativity and humor of Brazilians, and you get a whole new world of Portuguese slang and expressions!

Some Brazilian internet slang is more common with the younger crowds, while other slang phrases are used by people of all ages. Besides that, many expressions born online and in memes end up in the daily vocabulary of Brazilians, even if just for a few months. In this article, we’ll focus more on long-lasting expressions, abbreviations, and slang words. But if you’re curious enough, you can always continue keeping up-to-date with new memes and engage with Portuguese speakers online.

To make sure you’re up-to-speed with all the abbreviations, codes, and expressions in the Brazilian internet scene, be sure to check this guide and come back whenever you need to. After going through this guide, you’ll be able to handle your internet-based conversations and understand all the Brazilian online gírias, or “slang,” like a local!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Portuguese

Table of Contents

  1. Abbreviations Used in Portuguese Texting
  2. Laughing the Brazilian Way
  3. Portuguese Internet Slang Derived from English
  4. Internet Slangs Popular on Social Media
  5. Popular Emojis in Brazil
  6. Learn More Portuguese with PortuguesePod101

1. Abbreviations Used in Portuguese Texting

Man on His Laptop

Vc tá no trabalho hj? ( “Are you at work today?” )

Texting is all about speed in Brazil. Abbreviations are everywhere, since they make it much quicker to write sentences. In Portuguese, it works the same way it does in English: we make the words smaller by substituting whole syllables for just one or two letters.

1 – Basic Words

Texting Slang

The most commonly used abbreviations in Portuguese text slang are used by people of all ages in Brazil, and can be seen everywhere online from social media comments to Whatsapp messages. Considering the huge number of Brazilians connected to the internet, chances are you’ll encounter these abbreviations in your next text conversation!

Abbreviation Stands for Translation Example
vc / cê / c você “You” [singular] Vc vai?
“Are you going?”
vcs vocês “You” [plural] Vcs já sabem
“You already know.”
ñ / n não “No” Ñ sei
“I don’t know.”
bj / bjo beijo “Kiss” Manda um bj pra ele
“Send him a kiss.”
bjs / bjos beijos “Kisses” Tchau, bjos
“Bye, kisses.”
bjks beijocas “Small kisses” Até mais, bjks
“See you, kisses.”
td tudo “All” / “Everything” Td bem?
“How are you?”
mt muito “A lot” / “Very” / “Much” / “Many” Mt lindo
“Very beautiful”
oq o quê “What” Vai fazer oq amanhã?
“What will you do tomorrow?”
q que “That” Ele disse q não viria
“He said that he wouldn’t come.”
pq por que / por quê / porque / porquê “Why” / “Because” E pq ele não veio?
“Why didn’t he come?”
sdd / sdds saudade / saudades There isn’t a translation for this word! But it means something similar to “miss you.” Oi amiga, sdds!
“Hi friend, miss you.”
kd cadê “Where” Kd vc, não te vejo!
“Where are you, I can’t see you!”
tbm / tb também “Too” / “As well” Eu vou tbm
“I’ll go too.”
vdd verdade “True” É vdd?
“Is it true?”
ctz certeza “Certain” / “For sure” É vdd, ctz
“It’s true, for sure.”
cmg comigo “With me” Ela tá cmg
“She is with me.”
ctg contigo “With you” Ele tá ctg?
“Is he with you?”
ngn ninguém “No one” Não tem ngn na aula
“There is no one in class.”
qto quanto “How much” Qto custa?
“How much does it cost?”
qdo / qnd / qd quando “When” Qdo vamos?
“When are we going?”
gnt gente “People” / “Guys” Tem mt gnt aqui
“There are a lot of people here.”

Gnt, vamos!
“Guys, let’s go!”

msm mesmo “Same” Digo o msm
“I say the same.”
add adicionar “To add” (on social media) Me add no Face
“Add me on Facebook.”
qq qualquer “Any” Eu posso ir qq hora
“I can go any time.”
hj hoje “Today” Hj é feriado
“Today is a holiday.”
eh é “Is” A festa eh hj?
“Is the party today?”
neh “Isn’t it” Legal, neh?
“Cool, isn’t it?”
soh “Only” / “Just” / “Alone” Soh curiosidade
“Just curiosity”
d+ demais “Cool” / “Awesome” / “Too much” Que d+
“That’s awesome.”

Sdds d+
“Miss you too much.”

t+ até mais “See you soon” Beijos, t+
“Kisses, see you.”
uau onomatopoeia “Wow” Uau, sério?
“Wow, really?”

Man Checking Wristwatch

Man checking wristwatch

2 – Abbreviations of Expressions

The following abbreviations are a bit more popular among younger people. These are common Brazilian Portuguese text slang expressions that are used online, on social media, and when texting!

Abbreviation Stands for Translation Example/Explanation
mds Meu Deus “My God” / “OMG” Mds, é vdd?
“OMG, is it true?”
sqn só que não Similar to “Said no one ever” Amo segundas, sqn
“I love Mondays, said no one ever.”
ac acompanhando “Following” This is used in comments on Facebook, when you want to continue reading the comments in a post.
tmj (es)tamo(s) junto(s) “We’re together” / “I’m with you” / “I’m here for you” Difícil mesmo, mas tmj!
“It’s really complicated, but I’m here for you.”
blz beleza “Cool” / “Deal” Vamos outro dia, blz?
“Let’s go on another day, cool?”
flw falou “Bye” / “Ok” Até mais, flw!
“See you, bye!”

Vou dormir agora, flw?
“I’m going to sleep now, ok?”

vlw valeu “Thanks” / “Owe you one” Vlw, miga!
“Thanks, friend!”
sla sei lá “I don’t know” Ah, sla!
“Ah, I don’t know.”
brinks brincadeira “Kidding” / “Just kidding” É brinks
“Just kidding.”
tranks tranquilo “All good” / “No problem” – Obrigada!
“Thanks!”

– Tranks
“No problem.”

miga / migo amiga / amigo “Friend” Miga, sdds!
“Friend, miss you!”
kra cara “Dude” Cara, vc ñ sabe o q aconteceu!
“Dude, you don’t know what happened.”
bb bebê “Baby” Td bem, bb?
“How are you, baby?”
kbça cabeça “Head” This is an ironic name for someone, implying they aren’t very smart or that they did something silly.
mec “Cool” / “All good” Tô mec, e você?
“I’m good, and you?”
fds / findi fim de semana “Weekend” Vai fazer o q esse findi?
“What are you doing this weekend?”
fds f*da-se “F*ck it” This is a swear word that expresses annoyance or exasperation. Watch the context to differentiate it from the previous use of fds.
pqp p*** que pariu “Holy s***” This is a swear word that expresses surprise or frustration.
fdp filho/filha da p*** “Son of a b****” This is a swear word used against other people.
kct c*cete Works like a “WTF” Kct, sério?
“WTF, really?”
aff This can express both shock or boredom (like a sigh).
putz This is another interjection that can express shock or surprise.

/! Note /!

You might have noticed that the different conjugations of the verb estar can appear in two ways: the original version and a shortened version.

está → tá
estou → tô
estamos → tamos

These aren’t slang words per se, and they’re very common in both spoken Portuguese and in text messages or social media.

2. Laughing the Brazilian Way

Computer Words

A guide to Brazilian Portuguese internet slang could never be complete without an in-depth look at how Brazilians laugh online. With the vast numbers of Brazilians on the internet, the particular way in which they laugh has caused plenty of confusion online. Let’s unpack the top ways in which Brazilians laugh online and get you laughing along!

  • kkk

The award for most confusing laughter has to go to kkk—and all of its variations with an increasing number of k’s, depending on how much fun you’re having! And no, don’t worry, this is not a racist salute in any way.

For some reason, in Brazil, the idea of laughing with a “qua-qua-qua” sound is an old one, as you can hear in this song of the iconic Brazilian singer Elis Regina.

  • rsrs

This is an abbreviation of the word risos (“laughter”).

  • huahuahuahua

This is another common way of laughing, derived from the traditional “hahaha.”

  • hdashdjkasdjshdsdjasd

Randomly pressing letters on the keyboard is also common!

  • Other honorable mentions

huehuehue, hauhauhauhau, spoaskoaksak, kjkjkjkjkjkjkj, haushhaushshsuah

Can you tell Brazilians are happy people? A simple “LOL” is not enough to express all the dimensions of fun!

Man and Woman Laughing at a Party

3. Portuguese Internet Slang Derived from English

Many commonly used internet slang words in Portuguese actually originate from English words! And we’re not talking about the abbreviations that come straight from the English language and are used in the same context, like BFF, OMG, or plz. After all, in Brazil, things go a step further!

Most of the cases below are used as verbs, adding a Portuguese ending to an English word. This kind of expression is quite common, and there’s always a new one being added to the Brazilian internet vocabulary! Let’s take a look at the most popular ones.

Expression Translation Example/Explanation
stalkear “To stalk” Eu stalkeei ela no Instagram
“I stalked her on Instagram.”
crushear “To have a crush” Tá crusheando, né?
“You have a crush, don’t you?”
trollar “To troll” O pessoal não cansa de trollar na internet
People don’t get tired of trolling online.”
shippar “To ship” Eu shippo muito esse casal
“I ship this couple very much.”
flopar “To fail” / “To be unsuccessful” O novo album dessa banda flopou
“This band’s new album was a fail.”
hypado “Hyped” Esse restaurante tá muito hypado
“This restaurant is too hyped.”
zapzap “Whatsapp” Originally, this is what older people called Whatsapp.
Face “Facebook” Me add no Face!
“Add me on Facebook.”
Insta “Instagram” Posta no Insta
“Post it on Instagram.”

Old man shrugging in confusion

Sometimes the Expressions Make No Literal Sense!

4. Internet Slangs Popular on Social Media

You may not know, but Brazil is a fertile land for memes! As a result, many Portuguese expressions are born online and can even reach the streets being used in real life. Here are some popular internet-born slang words and expressions that you might hear from locals in an informal conversation.

Expression Literal translation Explanation Example
dar biscoito / querer biscoito “To give a cookie” / “To want a cookie” This is used when someone is seeking attention or compliments. Olha quantas fotos ele postou, ele quer biscoito.
“Look how many pictures he posted, he wants attention.”
tá na Disney “He/she is in Disney” This phrase expresses that someone is saying something out of reality, as if they were in a cartoon or movie. Você quer comprar esse carro? Tá na Disney?
“You want to buy this car? Are you crazy?”
Deus me livre mas quem me dera “God forbid, but I wish” This is a paradoxical expression that refers to those situations where you want something but rationally you know you shouldn’t. There is a song with this name! Todo mundo está namorando. Deus me livre, mas quem me dera.
“Everyone is dating now. I don’t want it but also, I do.”
fada sensata “Wise fairy” This is used as a compliment, mostly for women, based on their wise actions or comments. Ela pediu demissão. Fada sensata.
“She quit her job, smart woman.”
dar PT “To have a total loss” PT is short for Perda Total (“total loss”). This expression is used when someone gets very drunk. Dei PT na festa de ontem
“I was blackout drunk at the party yesterday.”
10/10 “10 out of 10” This one is a compliment on someone’s appearance. Scarlett Johansson é muito 10/10
“Scarlett Johansson is gorgeous.”
mitar “To be a myth” This is used when someone does something amazing. Ele mitou muito na apresentação
“He was amazing at the presentation.”
Meldels “My God” This is another way of expressing surprise, just like OMG, but in a funnier way. Meldels, é verdade isso?
“OMG, is it true?”
menine “Boy or girl” This is a unissex way of referring to somebody. Menine, você não vai acreditar!
“Hey you, you won’t believe this!”
berro “Scream” This expresses a strong reaction to something surprising or very funny. – Você viu o vídeo da festa?

– Berro!

– “Have you seen the video of the party?”

– “OMG!”

socorro / scrro / scrr “Help” This is used when reacting to something very funny. – Olha esse meme!

– Scrr! Hahahaha

– “Look at this meme.”

– “LOL!”

→ Continue learning what’s popular in Brazil with the Top 5 Culture Icons You Need to Know About, on PortuguesePod101!

5. Popular Emojis in Brazil

Computer Sentences

Wondering what the most popular emojis are in Brazil? Since they’re such an important part of texting, it’s good to know what’s commonly used when talking to locals!

  1. Red heart ❤️
  2. Heart eyes 😍
  3. Clapping hands 👏
  4. Cat with heart eyes 😻
  5. Please / Thank you 🙏
  6. Music 🎶
  7. Smiling moon, which can imply flirting 🌚
  8. Peace sign ✌️
  9. Eyes 👀

Woman chatting on her phone

Now You’re Ready to Text Like a Brazilian!

6. Learn More Portuguese with PortuguesePod101

Feeling ready to confidently text in Brazilian Portuguese? Feel free to come back to this article whenever you need to brush up on your Portuguese internet slang. New expressions and abbreviations might pop up from time to time, so the best way to keep up-to-date is engaging with Portuguese speakers online!

Do you think we forgot any important slang words or phrases? Did the examples help you understand when to use each expression? Let us know in the comments below!

Now it’s time to continue on your language-learning journey! There are more free Portuguese resources and a variety of vocabulary lists available on PortuguesePod101. Go ahead and choose your favorite tools to expand your learning opportunities.

If you want to take your learning experience further, members of PortuguesePod101.com get access to the largest language lesson library in the world, with thousands of real lessons by real teachers. Perfect for anyone who wants to learn from anywhere, feel motivated, and be ready to speak Portuguese with confidence.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Portuguese

12 Essential Untranslatable Portuguese Words

Thumbnail

Not everything can be translated. The Biblical story of the Tower of Babel tells of a time when all humans stopped speaking the same language to drown in the confusion of different idioms. The conflicts have spread throughout humankind, which has been dissolved into different tribes.

Indeed, communication is full of perils. Speech is the root of every possible human bond and results in building or destroying bridges. Normally, when a message fails to be transmitted, the consequences aren’t good.

This effort to translate is hard enough in daily matters. But what about the untranslatable Portuguese words and those of other languages?

The benefits of learning untranslatable Portuguese words may not be obvious at first sight, but they exist. For one, it’s a good way to learn more about the culture of the target country and to understand more about the native speakers’ mindset.

That’s why you’re about to grow as a student with the help of a brand-new list of untranslatable Portuguese words from PortuguesePod101!

Disclaimer

The following words will be presented with a literal translation, which could also be properly called an approximate meaning. Because these are Portuguese words with no English equivalent, right? But we’ll do our best to communicate the actual meaning after the literal translation to make it as precise as possible.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Portuguese

Table of Contents

  1. Saudade
  2. Fado
  3. Gostosa
  4. Tapioca
  5. Oca
  6. Xodó
  7. Desbundar
  8. Cafuné
  9. Ouvido e orelha
  10. Anteontem
  11. Cadê
  12. Caprichar
  13. How PortuguesePod101 Can Help You Learn More Untranslatable Words in Portuguese

1. Saudade

Best Ways to Learn

Literal Translation:

There isn’t one.

Meaning:

Feelings of nostalgia and longing for something, someone, or some situation. Normally, these are melancholy feelings, but can also carry joyful undertones.

Example Situations:

To long for a dead relative; missing a childhood object; to miss an ex-partner (or the feelings you felt toward them); to yearn to go back in time to a situation.

Usage in a Sentence:

  • Sinto saudade dela.
    “I miss her.”
  • Que saudades da casa da minha infância…
    “Oh, how I long for the house of my childhood…”

When it comes to words often used together with this term, people usually “have” saudade or “feel” saudade.

The feeling can also be expressed as a lament with the help of que: Que saudade da casa da minha infância…

Additional Notes:

Some people see this as one of the most beautiful untranslatable Portuguese words. The word is largely employed in lyrical context, which is probably the best context to learn the many ways it can be used.

Saudade ranges from modern Brazilian music from the end of the 1950s (João Gilberto’s Chega de Saudade album) back to the poems of Luís Vaz de Camões (Nascerão Saudades Do Meu Bem, for instance) in the 17th century. These were some of the most important contributions in shaping the pillars of the popular Portuguese idiom that we know today.

Actually, saudade has been present in Portuguese poetry since it began. The medieval cantigas de amigo (“friend songs,” or romantic chivalry lyrics) already used the word to describe the feeling of maidens left behind by their knights to die in battles.

So, if you search well enough, you may draw the conclusion that this is not only a very old and beautiful word, but also one of the most popular untranslatable words in Portuguese.

2. Fado

José Malhoa’s painting “Fado” (1910) depicts a working class Portuguese couple in a moment of artistic contemplation.

Literal Translation:

“Fate”

Meaning:

Besides being a less popular translation for “fate,” fado is the name of a popular melancholic Portuguese music genre.

Example Situation:

The most common use of fado is in fado lyrics, such as Tudo isto é fado by poet Aníbal Nazaré, and it was made famous by the voice of Portuguese singer Amália Rodrigues:

Almas vencidas/Noites perdidas/Sombras bizarras(…)/Amor ciúme/Cinzas e lume/Dor e pecado/Tudo isto existe/Tudo isto é triste/Tudo isto é fado(… )

“Beaten souls/Lost nights/Bizarre shadows(…)/Love jealousy/Cinders and lights/Pain and sin/All this exists/All this is sad/All this is fado(…)”

Usage in a Sentence:

Fado can be used with and without musical context, though the latter is much less common.
When the word is used in lyrics, it can depict both the song genre and fate, depending on the situation.

Additional Notes:

Exposure to fado singers’ and instrumentalists’ works will not only lead you to find popular poetry and more interesting untranslatable Portuguese idioms. It will also present to you the unique universe of Moorish and European musical expression and instruments, blended into Portugal’s modern musical pride.

Also, you’ll certainly find some of the most beautiful Portuguese words and phrases we need in English.

3. Gostosa

Literal Translation:

“Tasty”

Meaning:

To use gostosa is similar to using “hot” to describe an attractive woman. It can also be used for men, adapted to gostoso.

Example Situation:

Gostosa is an adjective and one of the funny untranslatable Portuguese words on this list. But as you may have imagined, to call someone “tasty” can be perceived as very vulgar by the person receiving the compliment.

An example situation for the appropriate use of this word would be in a context of informality and intimacy. It’s sexy talk. For instance, if used during flirting, gostosa normally would not be employed to establish first impressions—don’t be a jerk.

Usage in a Sentence:

  • Já te disseram que você é bem gostosa?
    “Did someone ever tell you that you’re very hot?”

4. Tapioca

Bubble Tea with Tapioca Balls

Literal Translation:

There isn’t one.

Meaning:

It’s a type of edible flour made of manioc, but the word is normally used to describe a fine pancake recipe prepared with this flour and various types of fillings.

Example Situation:

Tapioca is a noun, which means it can be qualified by adjectives. The most common ones for an interested gourmand would be doce or salgado (“sweet” or “salted”), since these are the flavors offered when ordering one.

Despite the choice of fillings, there aren’t many ways to prepare tapioca: mostly, it’s fried (frita) in a pan without oil. But you might find other ways to serve it, since it’s growingly incorporated into other plates and candies. For instance: dadinho de tapioca (“little tapioca dice” ) or sorvete de tapioca (“tapioca ice cream”).

Usage in a Sentence:

  • Esta tapioca com manteiga está deliciosa, mas prefiro com recheio doce.
    “This buttered tapioca is delicious, but I’d rather eat one with a sweet filling.”

Additional Notes:

This isn’t one of the hard Portuguese words to learn or use. Indeed, rather than learning this example of untranslatable Brazilian Portuguese words, you’re probably better off tasting a sample of tapioca! To savor it is also untranslatable…

This Brazilian delicacy is a native dish and very popular in the Northern and Northeastern regions of the country. In the time of colonization, it was fed to the slaves and also served as food for settlers. Presently, it’s a “trendy” option for snacks and sandwiches among gym enthusiasts, since it can be prepared as a very thin yet consistent and energetic pancake, and filled with “healthy” ingredients.

5. Oca

A Photo of the Oca Building by Niemeyer

Niemeyer’s Oca building is inspired by primordial native constructions

Literal Translation:

There isn’t one.

Meaning:

An indigenous dwelling made out of wood and vegetable fibers—typically found in Brazil.

Don’t confuse this word with the Portuguese translation for “hollow,” which is pronounced “oh-kah.” The word in question here should be pronounced with an “open o” (like in the word “rock”).

Example Situation:

Consisting of three letters, this is probably one of the least hard Portuguese words to learn from this list. It’s normally employed in native contexts.

Usage in a Sentence:

The word is typically used to describe indigenous houses, and not in connotative manners. A group of ocas can be called an aldeia.

Additional Notes:

The format of an oca is rounded and it can vary in size. To imagine one, you just need to picture a coconut sunken halfway into the ground.

The form of the oca has served as inspiration for modern architectural structures in Brazil. The most famous one is Oscar Niemeyer’s Oca in the Ibirapuera Park, in São Paulo. It’s a museum for small- to medium-sized expositions.

6. Xodó

Literal Translation:

There isn’t one.

Meaning:

The dearest one; the loved one

Example Situation:

Xodó can be used to refer to different types of people for whom the speaker feels tenderness. Relatives, especially children, can be xodós. For example, a grandson can be a grandmother’s xodó, and vice-versa. Pets, dear objects, and hobbies can be xodós as well.

Finally, this word can also be applied in a dating context as a synonym for a valentine or a dear one.

Usage in a Sentence:

Xodó is a popular example of untranslatable words in Portuguese vocabulary. It should be used in informal register.

An example of the expression’s usage in a dating context is Dominguinhos’ song Xodó, also interpreted by Luiz Gonzaga. This forró singer is among Brazil’s most famous musicians of all time. The chorus of the tune is as follows:

  • Eu só quero um amor/Que acabe o meu sofrer/Um xodó pra mim/Do meu jeito assim/Que alegre o meu viver
    “All I want is a valentine/That will end my suffering/A valentine for me/Just the way I like it/That will lighten up my living”

The term can also refer to the relationship itself, not the valentine.

Other examples outside of the dating context are:

  • Ele tem um xodó tremendo pelo carro.
    “He is tremendously in love with his car.”
    (Note that the “relationship” meaning is employed in this case, but in a connotative manner.)
  • A garotinha era o xodó do professor de História.
    “The little girl was the dearest of the history teacher.”

7. Desbundar

People Drinking at a Party

Literal Translation:

There isn’t one.

Meaning:

This is one of the most complex untranslatable Portuguese words on this list. Essentially, this verb is equivalent to “dazzle”…but not only that. It also carries behavioral tones that are not encompassed by “dazzle.” For example, desbundar can refer to losing control, becoming inebriated, or taking to deviant sexual behavior.

Finally, to free yourself from social constraints in general can be described as desbundar (the verb) or desbunde (the noun, which is the liberating act itself).

Example Situation:

Someone at a party after their fourth glass of caipirinha is ready to desbundar—if they haven’t already.

Usage in a Sentence:

  • Beatriz desbundou de vez após consumir tanta droga.
    “Beatriz has lost track completely after consuming so many drugs.”
  • O turista desbundou quando viu o Rio Amazonas.
    “The tourist was bedazzled by the sight of the Amazonas River.”

Additional Notes:

Desbundar and desbunde are more examples of why untranslatable Portuguese terms are somewhat hard for foreigners to understand fully, even after they learn the general idea. Foreign speakers lack certain cultural information, which is sometimes hard to get.

We’ve already commented on musical and literary repertoire related to other words. In this case, desbunde (in the sense of liberation or losing track of reality) was popularized in the context of the Brazilian dictatorship of the 1960s. That was when desbunde got this sense among artists who were experimenting with cultural norms, sexual liberation, and aesthetic modernization.

8. Cafuné

Literal Translation:

There isn’t one.

Meaning:

Running your fingers through one’s hair

Example Situation:

Though it may seem like a romantic gesture, a cafuné is a normal form of affection in Brazil among friends and relatives. Though it can certainly be used in a romantic context as well.

Usage in a Sentence:

  • Vem cá me fazer um cafuné.
    “Come here and give me a cuddle.”

9. Ouvido e orelha

A Man Listening to Something

Literal Translation:

“Ear” and…”ear”

Meaning:

This may come across as something odd.

Ouvido stands for the inner part of the ear (the ducts inside the tiny hole of the ear), whereas orelha is the outer part of the ear—its “structure.”

Example Situation:

Typically, when it comes to hearing something or having pain in the ear, the speaker will refer to the ouvido.

When talking about the physical structure of the ear, the part seen by the eyes, the speaker will talk about orelha.

Usage in a Sentence:

  • Vou ao médico, pois estou com dor de ouvido.
    “I’m going to the physician because I feel pain in my ear.”
  • Levei uma bolada na orelha e agora ela está vermelha como um pimentão.
    “They’ve kicked the ball against my ear and now it is red as a pepper.”

Additional Notes:

Someone with large ears is often called orelhas de abano (“fan ears”).

Someone with good hearing skills is considered to have ouvidos de tísico or ouvidos de tuberculoso (both synonyms for “tuberculous ears”).

10. Anteontem

Literal Translation:

“Before yesterday”

Meaning:

It is the day before yesterday.

Example Situation:

Actually, an English speaker can find an equivalent for this word in “ereyesterday.” But since this form is extremely archaic, we consider anteontem to be one of the important untranslatable Portuguese words for new learners.

Anteontem is freely and often used in Portuguese conversations not only in Brazil, but also in Portugal, Angola, Mozambique, and Guiné-Bissau.

Usage in a Sentence:

  • Você deveria ter feito a reserva anteontem…
    “You should have done the reservations the day before yesterday…”
  • Ela assistiu um filme terrível anteontem.
    “She watched a terrible movie the day before yesterday.”
  • Aonde todos foram anteontem?
    “Where did everybody go the day before yesterday?”

Other commonly used verbs that go with anteontem are: comer (“to eat”), tocar (“to play”), jogar (“to play”), and the list goes on.

Additional Notes:

Fun fact: This word is an example of linguistic bricolage in Portuguese. It’s the exact combination of antes (“before” ) and ontem (“yesterday”).

11. Cadê

Literal Translation:

“Where is”

Meaning:

This is a subtle example of Brazillian Portuguese words you can’t translate into English. You most certainly can ask where something is in English. But can you do it in one word? Cadê, also known as quede or quedê, is the contraction of “where is” (onde está) in one word—even though onde está doesn’t sound anything close to cadê.

Example Situation:

If you’ve lost something or want to know where someone is, cadê is the word of choice.

Fun fact: In the late 1990s, Cadê was the name of a Brazilian web search engine, similar to Google.

Usage in a Sentence:

  • Cadê o chinelo?
    “Where is the flip flop [sandal]?”
  • Cadê Tereza?
    “Where is Tereza?”

Additional Notes:

Actually, quede is the contraction of que é de…? which is an archaic way of asking for something’s whereabouts. Curiously enough, que é de is the exact equivalent to “what became of…?”

Cadê or quedê are preferable to quede, which can also refer to a sports shoe or a golf caddie. Or you can engage in truly untranslatable Portuguese phrases asking where the caddie is: quede o quede?

12. Caprichar

Hot Dog with Mustard

Literal Translation:

“To make it in a whimsical way”

Meaning:

To put effort into something; to execute something well

Example Situation:

This is yet another interesting case of Portuguese words with no English translation. The literal translation of capricho (the noun) would be “whim.” In Portuguese, capricho can also mean “whim,” actually.

But for some reason, the verb caprichar is different. When someone capricha in something, they’re doing it well or at least putting effort into it.

Usage in a Sentence:

  • Este relatório será apresentado ao chefe, então por favor capriche!
    “This report will be presented to the boss, so please make it as good as you can!”
  • Tem como fazer este cachorro-quente bem caprichado?
    “Can you make this hot dog a big and fat one?”

Note that the term has been employed in a connotative manner. A caprichado hot dog would be a big and fat one in the eyes of the speaker. This is what’s expected from the snack for it to be the best possible.

Additional Notes:

As you may have noticed, other forms of words can derive from caprichar. The noun capricho is one of them, and the adjective caprichado is another very common example. Either way, all of these words are often employed in colloquial register rather than formal.

13. How PortuguesePod101 Can Help You Learn More Untranslatable Words in Portuguese

Reasons for Studying

A friendly push can lead a beginner or intermediate speaker to a truly clear path of knowledge. In fact, learning a language alone is usually harder than connecting to other people, teachers, and cultures in the process.

PortuguesePod101 is a database that gathers free resources for Portuguese speakers at every level. Our sections and lessons are organized to guarantee a balanced approach to the content. Untranslatable terms in Portuguese will be easier to learn when you combine formal “classroom” teaching and informal, relaxed articles, podcasts, videos, and other learning tools.

Indeed, the MyTeacher feature is one to behold. This fast-track to fluency will give you guidance, one-on-one contact, and personalized feedback to help you improve your Portuguese skills. You’ll get to learn Portuguese terms we wish existed in English, and many other important cultural traits that are hard to get elsewhere without going abroad.

Get access to a whole new world of knowledge with PortuguesePod101. We’ll give you the tools—you finish the job!

Before you go, let us know in the comments if any of these words were new to you. We look forward to hearing from you!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Portuguese

Self-Introduction Guide: “My Name is,” in Portuguese and More

Thumbnail

When getting to know a different country and culture, why not start by learning the local language, a guaranteed way to let locals know you’re interested in being part of their world and culture?

Learning some quick tips and basic conversational rules can be a great shortcut to making new friends, ensuring a variety of experiences during your visit, and even arranging business opportunities. With Brazilians, trying to speak Portuguese is a sign of great respect and should earn you quick empathy amongst locals.

First things first, learn how to introduce yourself in Portuguese. A simple “my name is…” in Portuguese can represent the difference between a long-lasting, successful relationship with locals, and just passing by unnoticed. If you ever googled “How to say my name in Brazilian Portuguese,” this guide is tailor-made for you. 😉

Regarding Portuguese, one of the most-spoken languages, you don’t have to worry about advanced studies of language in a college (or anything like that) to achieve those goals we mentioned. Let’s start with the basic “Hello, my name is,” in Portuguese and work our way up from there. You’ll be able to introduce yourself in Brazilian Portuguese in no time!

Table of Contents

  1. Identifying Yourself
  2. Placing Yourself in Society
  3. Sharing Personal Details
  4. How PortuguesePod101 Can Help You Learn More Portuguese

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Portuguese

1. Identifying Yourself

Don’t be just another passing-by gringo. Brazilians tend to be very open people (way more than the average North-American or European), and a way to show that you’re interested in bonding with them and their culture is learning basic introductions.

Letting your conversation partner know your name is the foundation stone in any dialogue, and in any language, so we should begin there. Keep in mind that you can use many forms to greet someone. It’s up to you to choose!

1- “My Name is,” in Portuguese

First Encounter

  • “My name is John Doe/Jane Doe.”
    O meu nome é John Doe/Jane Doe.

Though both languages use the Latin alphabet, Portuguese has different speaking nuances than English. Vowels in Portuguese usually have the same sound in any word, except when marked with accents.

In the sentence above, for example, the letter é, with the accent, is pronounced like the “e” in the English word “bet.” This is the “to be” verb, so it’s essential for a new speaker to learn how to say it properly. Without the accent, e means “and,” and is pronounced like the “e” in “ember.” Always mind your pronunciation.

The approximate sound of “My name is…” in Portuguese, then, should be something like Oo mayu noh-me eh John Doe/Jane Doe.

There are several other forms you can use to answer the “how to say my name in Brazilian Portuguese” question. Here are a few other options:

  • “I am called John Doe/Jane Doe.”
    Eu me chamo John Doe/Jane Doe.
    Eoo me sha-moo John Doe/Jane Doe.
  • “I am John Doe/Jane Doe. ”
    Eu sou o John Doe/a Jane Doe. [Mind the gender article.]
    Eoo sow ô John Doe/ah Jane Doe. [This ô has a closed pronunciation, like the “o” in “row” for instance).

2- Where Are You From?

Swedish Countries

After introducing your name, the next step in how to introduce yourself in Brazilian Portuguese is to talk a little about where you come from. Brazilians are always fascinated to know people from abroad, and the more details you feel comfortable giving, the more the average Brazilian is likely to bond with you (and in less time).

Keep in mind, though, that not everyone in Brazil is very good with foreign geography, so when trying to introduce yourself in Portuguese and telling them where you come from, be specific and detailed. For example, if you come from Brooklyn, be sure to add that it’s not only a part of New York City, but also a part of the United States.

That said, let’s see some examples of introducing yourself in Portuguese regarding birthplace.

  • “I come from Brooklyn, New York City, USA.”
    Eu venho do Brooklyn, Nova Iorque, Estados Unidos.

The pronunciation should be something similar to: Eoo ven-niow do Brooklyn, Novah York, Es-tah-dows Oo-nee-dows.
It’s also possible to use a variation that wouldn’t be correct in English, but works just fine in Brazilian Portuguese:

    “I am from Brooklyn, New York City, USA.”
    Eu sou do Brooklyn, Nova Iorque, Estados Unidos.

The pronunciation should be something like: Eoo sow do Brooklyn, Novah York, Es-tah-dows Oo-nee-dows. [Remember to keep those Os with a closed sound!]

2. Placing Yourself in Society

About Yourself

Learning how to say “Hello, my name is,” in Portuguese is just the first step in becoming more than just another tourist in Brazil. If you’re really interested in bonding and blending in, don’t be afraid to try and go even further! Okay, you’ve already said where you come from, but how about your line of work?

1- Talking About Your Profession in Portuguese

Like in the Western world, talking about professions is as natural as it gets. Of course, it’s impossible to generalize, but overall this is a very good way to keep a dialogue from going toward that uncomfortable silence we all hate.

A good way to begin is just speaking about your profession. Remember to keep it simple, so perhaps an “I am a/an [profession],” is the best way to go. Let’s see how it looks in Portuguese, then:

  • “I am a journalist.”
    Eu sou jornalista.
    Eoo sow johr-nah-lees-tah.

Journalist at Work with Typewriter

After that, feel safe to talk about where you currently work, or perhaps some of your professional history—that will definitely show your conversation partner you’re interested not only in learning about their country and culture, but also in sharing some of your own personal life story. That said, let’s see how to say it properly in Portuguese:

  • “I work at the New York Times.”
    Eu trabalho no New York Times.
    Eoo tra-bah-liow noo New York Times.

If you want to be a little more specific, don’t hesitate to try:

  • “I take photos for the New York Times.”
    Eu tiro fotos para o New York Times.
    Eoo tee-ro phoh-tows pah-rah oo New York Times.
  • “I write for the New York Times.”
    Eu escrevo para o New York Times.
    Eoo scre-vow pah-rah oo New York Times.

2- Talking About Your Education

As a bonus, you can go as far as telling Brazilians where you studied. If you don’t feel so confident, rest assured that a lot of American culture has made its way to Brazil over the years, and there’s a huge chance that anyone you’re talking with shows great interest in hearing about your college (and even high school) experiences.

Quick tip: “High school” in Brazilian Portuguese is called Ensino Médio, which literally translates to “middle school.” “College” is called Ensino Superior, which translates to “Upper School” or “Superior School,” so don’t get confused! It’s safer, though, to refer to “college” as faculdade or universidade. Ensino Superior is way too formal.

You can also talk about what you studied. This is very common in Brazil, and the structure is similar to talking about where you studied.

  • “I studied at Midwood High School.”
    Eu estudei na escola Midwood High School no Ensino Médio.
    Eoo ess-too-day na ess-koh-lah Midwood High School noo En-see-now Meh-dee-ow.
  • “I went to Harvard for college/university.”
    Eu estudei em Harvard na faculdade. OR Eu fiz faculdade em Harvard.
    Eoo ess-too-day em Harvard nah fah-cool-dah-de. OR Eoo fiss fah-cool-dah-de em Harvard.
  • “I studied Journalism at Columbia.”
    Eu estudei jornalismo em Columbia. OR Eu fiz jornalismo em Columbia.
    Eoo ess-too-day johr-nah-lees-mow em Columbia. OR Eoo fiss johr-nah-lees-mow em Columbia.

3. Sharing Personal Details

Introducing Yourself

Okay, now you’ve said “My name is,” in Portuguese and also learned to talk a little about your profession and education. The next level is sharing personal details. Of course, whether or not to share lots of details is completely up to you. But here are some nice tips for doing so as you introduce yourself in Brazilian Portuguese.

1- Talking About Your Age

Question Mark Birthday Cake

They now know your name, your line of work, and even your high school and university names, but when were you born? Mind that Portuguese is a little different from English here. In English, you would say “I am 29 years old,” just the way you say “I am John Doe,” right? In Brazilian Portuguese, it doesn’t work that way. The verb used in that language is the “have” verb. Therefore, when answering “How old are you?” your sentence should be:

  • “I have 29 years.”
    Eu tenho 29 anos.
    Eoo ten-nio vin-tchy e noh-vee ah-noss.

It’s also possible to say just the numeral, like in English: “twenty-nine” = vinte e nove = vin-tchy e noh-vee.

Another possibility is sharing the year you were born. That should look like this:

  • “I was born in 1990.”
    Eu nasci em 1990.
    Eoo nah-see em mew-noveh-sentows-e-noven-tah.

2- Talking About Where You Live

Now they know your age and your origins. Perhaps it’s time to talk about where you currently live.

  • “I live in Boston now.”
    Eu moro em Boston agora. OR Eu vivo em Boston agora.
    Eoo vee-vow em Boston ah-goh-rah. OR Eoo moh-row em Boston ah-goh-rah.

The “final weapon” you can use that will work with virtually any Brazilian is—guess? Soccer.

Even if you encounter someone who’s not exactly a soccer fan (something rare, yes), the fact that you feel comfortable talking about what’s probably the biggest national pride will surely show beyond any question that you are interested in bonding.

The first rule regarding language in this case is the word “soccer” itself, that doesn’t exist in Portuguese. The official name in Brazil is futebol and, as it’s easy to see, sounds almost exactly like “football.” That said, always remember that futebol is “soccer,” and futebol americano is what you probably know as “football” (which is referred to as “American Football” in Brazil). Not easy, right?

  • “Which soccer team do you root for?”
    Para qual time de futebol você torce?
    Pah-rah cual tee-me de foo-te-ball vow-se tohr-se?

3- Talking About Your Family

If you feel comfortable enough, tell your conversation partner about your family as well. This will surely help you bond easier. You don’t have to give full names or anything like that; just give their first name, their profession, and maybe where they live (if not with you, of course). Details like this are harmless and should keep any friendly conversation going smoothly.

  • “My dad is called Frank, he is a lawyer and lives in Chicago.”
    Meu pai se chama Frank, ele é advogado e mora em Chicago.
    Meoo pah-ee se shah-mah Frank, eh-leh eah ad-vow-gah-dow eh moh-rah em Chicago.

4- Talking About Your Hobbies

Another subject always pleasant to discuss is that of hobbies. Everyone’s got hobbies, and it might surprise you how easy it is to find a special connection with someone who shares the same interests as you, regardless of nationality. Don’t be shy to ask them, and also to share yours! There are no rules, and you can talk about playing a musical instrument, collecting stamps, visiting beaches, building scale models of airplanes, writing poems, and so on. Just give it a shot!

  • “I play the bass in a band.”
    Eu toco baixo numa banda.
    Eoo toh-co bye-shoo noo-mah ban-dah.

How PortuguesePod101 Can Help You Learn More Portuguese

If you’re planning to visit Brazil, but don’t feel confident enough about speaking with locals, don’t hesitate to try to learn as much as you can before boarding the plane. Remember that, apart from the biggest urban centres in São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Brasília, and a few others, the average Brazilian speaks little to no English.

PortuguesePod101 is an ideal way of getting to know Portuguese as it matters: in situations that might actually happen. What’s the point of learning from long and senseless textbooks if they can’t help you properly when you get there?

Learning a language so different from English should be fun and culturally relevant. Start by learning how to say “My name is,” in Portuguese and work your way up from there, one step at a time. Asking the right questions, and discovering how to give the proper answers regarding key points in Brazilian culture and lifestyle, can make a real difference.

We hope we adequately answered the question “How do you introduce yourself in Portuguese?” but don’t hesitate to reach out with any questions or concerns you have. Before you go, why not practice what you learned today? Leave us a comment below introducing yourself in Portuguese! We look forward to hearing from you. 🙂

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Portuguese

Watch TV in Portuguese with the Best Series and Shows

Thumbnail

Talk with anyone who’s learned a new language and they’ll tell you that music, TV shows, and books were a major help in improving their knowledge. So if you’re learning Portuguese, why not do the same?

You’re definitely lucky in that regard, especially when talking about TV shows, movies, and audiovisual productions. Brazil has a long tradition of good work in those areas, with dozens of telenovela Portuguese TV shows exported to hundreds of countries, and more recently, series that have gained respect worldwide.

So, there’s no need to search for Portuguese TV channels streams: We’ll bring some examples of the best Brazilian TV shows to learn Portuguese in this article. Thanks to streaming services, you can check them out and learn many valuable things. When you watch Portuguese TV, you’re also expanding your vocabulary, hearing common phrases, exposing yourself to colloquial language, and more. You’ll train your ears and brain, and Portuguese will become far more natural to you.

Try to watch the episodes without subtitles. If it’s too hard, go little by little: skip one phrase, see if you understood what was said, and go from there.

Without further ado, our list of the best TV shows in Portuguese for language-learners!

Table of Contents

  1. The Thorn and the Rose
  2. Jailers
  3. Magnifica 70
  4. It’s a Match
  5. Task Force
  6. Profession: Reporter
  7. 9mm: São Paulo
  8. Psi
  9. 1 Against All
  10. Aruanas
  11. Watch Your Way to Portuguese Mastery

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Improve Your Language Skills!

1. The Thorn and the Rose

Family Watching TV

What’s more Brazilian in TV than a novela? This genre of Portuguese TV shows started out much like the American soap operas in the 50s, but has gone through changes over the decades to become a bona-fide Brazilian export.

The Thorn and the Rose (O Cravo e a Rosa) is a classic novela, and offers a good experience for beginners to watch TV in Portuguese, and it’s available on the Globo Play streaming service. The language in the novelas is the most colloquial possible, since they’re the prime-time attraction in Brazil.

This humoristic production from 2000 is an adaptation of Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew. It depicts the joys and misunderstandings of a young couple, consisting of a rich, angry feminist and a rough but loving farmer at the beginning of the twentieth century.

The cast is full of TV stars (Eduardo Moscovis; Adriana Esteves) and the pronunciation ranges from very clear, urban idioms to rural, local-tinted versions of Portuguese. As in many Portuguese comedy TV shows, this novela is full of turnarounds and language play—which is a bonus for learners.

Quote:
Pois então, você vai dormir com as vacas porque esse aqui é meu quarto. É isso mesmo que você ouviu: vai dormir com as vacas. Se você quer dormir aqui no meu quarto, vai dormir sem travesseiro porque eu não sou bicho para ter cerca me separando… Bem que me disseram mesmo que não era para eu casar com a fera!

Translation:

“Well then, you’re going to sleep with the cows because this is my bedroom. That’s precisely what you’ve heard: you’re going to sleep with the cows. If you want to sleep in my bedroom, you’re going to sleep without a pillow because I’m no animal to have a fence separating me from you… And they have told me not to marry the beast!”

Vocabulary:

  • Vaca (Cow)
  • Bicho (Animal)
  • Casar-se (To marry)
  • Fera (Beast)

2. Jailers

Improve Listening

This series represents the effort that Globo channel (known worldwide for its novelas) is putting on productions for its streaming platform, Globo Play. Jailers (Carcereiros) is a Cannes-awarded series depicting the life of a state agent who deals daily with the intense and tragic realities of the incarcerated.

Jailers is based upon a non-fiction book by popular Brazilian author Drauzio Varella. To watch this Portuguese TV series is a good opportunity for learners to get more familiar with local slang, idiomatic expressions, and differences in speech between social classes in Brazil. The plot and dialogue are more complex than a novela’s.

Stories filled with tension and power play inside the jail, and are brought to life with the help of a robust cast of national stars (Rodrigo Lombardi; Leticia Sabatella;Toni Tornado) and a talented team of scriptwriters, such as author Marçal Aquino (Task Force; O Invasor)—which makes Jailers one of the best Portuguese TV shows you can feast your eyes on.

Quote:
Eu sou Vilma, diretora do presídio. Este é Adriano, carcereiro daqui. Bem-vindos à equipe. Convivência com preso não se aprende na academia, senhores. Isso, vocês vão aprender aqui no dia a dia. Você tem que ir para cima deles. A grande arma do agente penitenciário é a palavra: ela tem que ser mais forte que tiro de fuzil.

Translation:
“I am Vilma, the warden of the prison. This is Adriano, a jailer from here. Welcome to the team. You don’t learn to live with prisoners in the academy, gentlemen. This, you’ll have to learn here, daily. You have to go hard on them. The prison agent’s big weapon is the word: it has to be stronger than a rifle’s shot.”

Vocabulary:

  • Presídio (Prison)
  • Convivência (Living together; Intimacy)
  • Ir para cima deles (To go hard on them)
  • Penitenciário (Relative to prison)
  • Fuzil (Rifle)

3. Magnifica 70

With three seasons, Magnifica 70 (HBO) has a very original plot. It portrays a censor working for the government, who falls in love with an actress from a movie of the subversive pornochanchada genre—which mixes humor, eroticism, and not-so-profound narratives, and constituted a true national cinema industry.

Vicente, the censor, bans the movie, but is fascinated with the movie production and creativity of the work that comes out of an area called Boca do Lixo (Trash’s Mouth), in Sao Paulo. Magnifica 70 is available on HBOGO, which means it’s a Portuguese-spoken TV show with English subtitles.

Quote:
Você entra e banca o repórter. Daqui a uns quinze minutos, eu subo. É melhor ainda que ela me reconheça: ela se assusta e a gente dá uma ‘prensa’. Ela vai perceber que está tentando chantagear as pessoas erradas.

Translation:
“You enter and pretend you are a reporter. I’ll come up around fifteen minutes later. It’s even better that she recognizes us: she’ll be scared, so we can put pressure on her. She’ll notice that she’s trying to blackmail the wrong people.”

Vocabulary:

  • Bancar (To pretend)
  • Subir (To go up)
  • Chantagear (To blackmail)
  • Dar uma prensa (To put pressure on someone)

4. It’s a Match

Woman Laughing at TV

This original Globo Play production is a series about neurotic young adults struggling to adapt to the unspoken rules of a new world of fluid relations and interactions through social media. Sound familiar? It’s a Match (Shippados) may look like a poor man’s Master of None. But it’s much more than that: it’s a chance to take a glance at the Brazilian take on modern relations.

Brazilian TV darlings Eduardo Sterblitch and Tatá Werneck play the parts of the main characters, Enzo and Rita, a pair that tries to bond and eventually become a couple in this brave (and sometimes cold) new world.

It’s a Match is the last project of the famous late comedic screenwriter Fernanda Young (Os Normais; Aspones). You can expect lots of quick-paced irony and colloquial language from one of the top Portuguese TV shows.

Quote:
Moça, me perdoa, você pode fazer um favor para mim? A menina estava comigo aqui e foi ao banheiro e eu queria saber se ela está lá. Você poderia ver para mim? Não falei nada demais para ela, não, só que aconteceu isso outras vezes comigo e eu fico meio preocupado. Só que dessa vez, principalmente, porque ela tem 95% a ver comigo.

Translation:
“Lady, I beg your pardon: will you do me a favor? The girl who was seated here with me went to use the toilet and I’d like to know if she’s in there. Could you check it? I didn’t say anything absurd to her, no. I just get a little concerned, since it happened to me other times—only this time, mainly because she has 95% to do with me.”

Vocabulary:

  • Me perdoa (I beg your pardon)
  • Nada demais (Anything absurd)
  • Preocupado (Concerned)
  • Meio (A little)

5. Task Force

Women Hiding Her Face

It seems like the Brazilian audience likes crime and cop shows. And it’s true. Since the boom of Elite Squad, movie productions in that genre are common and Globo’s Task Force (Força Tarefa) is only one example.

The difference here is the focus, which changes from cops-versus-gangs and drug traffic to the investigations of the wrongdoings of Rio’s police and the challenges those officers have to face.

The advantage of this production is that the plot is very straightforward, so you understand what’s happening on the screen even if you miss some words. Shows like this can keep you motivated to continue to watch TV in Portuguese.

Quote:
Anunciar no jornal é que ele não vai, né? Sabe o que eu acho? Esse cara não vai vender essa arma no varejo. Porque é demorado e mais arriscado. Para mim, ele vai tentar vender tudo de uma vez só. Se eu souber de alguma coisa, te aviso. Vou ficar ligado!

Translation:
“He’s not going to announce it in the newspapers, is he? You know what I think? This guy will not sell this gun in the retail. Because it takes too long and is too risky. In my opinion, he will try to sell everything at one time. If I get to know something about it, I’ll let you know. I’ll stay tuned!”

Vocabulary:

  • Né? (Isn’t it?)
  • Cara (Guy)
  • Varejo (Retail)
  • Arriscado (Risky)

6. Profession: Reporter

The most efficient way to learn Portuguese with TV shows is to apprehend the mindset of the speakers. The national debates are a good way to understand local development, problems, and, most of all, people.

Watching the news can get pretty bleak, making Profession: Reporter’s (Profissão Repórter) approach to the journalistic report more attractive. Every episode brings a fresh team of young reporters, on- and off-camera, struggling to investigate in depth a hot national theme—from environmental to policial affairs, from Science and Arts to social themes.

Reporters from a land of continental dimensions (and sometimes in other Portuguese-speaking lands) expose the learner to different regional flavors of the language and to a myriad of cultural backgrounds. This is one of the best Brazilian TV shows to learn Portuguese, available on Globo Play for free.

Quote:
Esse é o Aglomerado da Serra, uma das maiores favelas do Brasil, com mais de 50 mil moradores. Existem vários projetos culturais na comunidade, entre eles o Lá da Favelinha. Aqui, jovens têm oficinas gratuitas de dança, moda, arte, idiomas e música. Jonathan Dance dá aula de passinho.

Translation:
“This is Aglomerado da Serra, one of the biggest slums in Brazil, with over 50-thousand dwellers. There are many cultural projects in the community, one of which is Lá da Favelinha. Young people here have access to free workshops of dance, fashion, arts, idioms, and music. Jonathan Dance teaches passinho.”

Vocabulary:

  • Moradores (Dwellers)
  • Favela (Slum)
  • Oficina (Workshop)
  • Moda (Fashion)
  • Dar aula (To teach)

7. 9mm: São Paulo

This FOX show is one of many about police forces in the act of duty, and is one of the best TV shows for learning Portuguese. This one focuses on Sao Paulo’s Police homicide department. The creator of the show, journalist Carlos Amorim, wrote an investigative book about the city’s main criminal organization, which is part of the theme.

With twenty episodes and three seasons, 9mm is more profound than just a cop show, and won’t hide the harsh reality of a violent city. This action series of forty-five-minute episodes promises great entertainment and will train your listening skills.

Quote:
Você acha que eu estou cansada? Então, você precisava ver quando a Dani teve catapora, ou quando ela quebrou a perna e eu tinha que fazer tudo para ela. Ou mesmo quando você ainda morava aqui, Alberto, e eu tinha que ir para a academia de polícia e deixar ela numa creche porque o pai dela tinha sumido.

Translation:
“Do you think I am tired? Then, you should have seen when Dani had chickenpox. Or when she broke her leg and I had to do everything for her. Or even when you used to live here, Alberto, and I had to go to the police academy and leave her in the day-care center because her father was missing.”

Vocabulary:

  • Sumir (To go missing; To disappear)
  • Cansada (Tired)
  • Catapora (Chickenpox)
  • Creche (Day-care center)

8. Psi

Man Eating Popcorn

Carlo is a psychiatrist and psychoanalyst who goes on his own to solve crimes in Sao Paulo using his knowledge of the human mind and behavior. The show was created by the eminent Italian-Brazilian psychiatrist Contardo Calligaris, who is a regular columnist for the Folha de S. Paulo newspaper. Psi is really Calligaris’ brainchild, reflecting the wit of his writings, and very analytical.

As far as TV shows in Portuguese go, Psi presents a lot of interesting cultural information, especially from the city of Sao Paulo. The depiction of landscapes, architecture, and personalities is a main facet of the production, and lets the viewer get in touch with the routines, fears, and personalities of the characters.

From the idiomatic point of view, Psi will be helpful for learning different types of dialogue and conversation in daily life—formal and casual expressions, for instance. The analyst goes through many ambiences and situations, and talks to many types of people, in the four seasons of this series.

On top of all that, this HBO production was nominated for Best Drama at the International Emmys in 2018, yet another reason to watch one of the best Portuguese TV shows out there.

Quote:
Conselho de vida? Bom, eu aconselharia as leitoras a viverem a vida de tal forma que, quando chegar a hora da morte, elas possam olhar para trás e concluir que a vida delas foi uma boa corrida. Um conselho para a vida amorosa: seria bom pensar que o culpado dos nossos fracassos e da nossa mediocridade somos nós mesmos—muito raramente os nossos parceiros.

Translation:
“An advice for life? Well, I’d recommend the readers to live life so that when death arrives, they can look behind and conclude that their life was a good run. An advice for the love life: it would be good to think that we are the ones to blame for our failures and our mediocrity—and very rarely our partners.”

Vocabulary:

  • Conselho (Advice)
  • De tal forma que (So that)
  • Vida amorosa (Love life)

9. 1 Against All

This FOX production went against Money Heist at the International Emmys. And it wouldn’t be absurd if it had won. The main character of 1 Against All (1 Contra Todos), Cadu, loses his job and is wrongfully convicted of drug trafficking in a town close to Sao Paulo.

Convicted, he has to assume a different persona to survive and prove his innocence. This is one of the best TV shows to learn Portuguese if you want to pick up some angry phrases and even curse words!

Quote:
Um cara assim, a gente nunca viu. Nem eu, nem você, talvez nem a polícia. É um criminoso diferente. Não é desses pés de chinelo que a gente está acostumado a ver todo dia. É o maioral. É o mandarim. É o chefe dos chefes. O Doutor do Tráfico. Vou repetir: o maior traficante do Brasil. E vamos mostrar a cara desse vagabundo, desse salafrário, desse sacripanta.

Translation:
“We have never seen a guy like this. Not me, nor you, and perhaps not even the police. He is a different type of criminal. It’s not one of these lowlifes we see everyday. He’s the big shot. The mandarin. The don of the dons. He’s Doctor Pusher. Come again: Brazil’s biggest drug peddler. And we’ll show the face of this tramp, this swindler, this crook.”

Vocabulary:

  • Pé de chinelo (Lowlife)
  • Maioral (Big shot”
  • Sacripanta (Crook)
  • Salafrário (Swindler)

10. Aruanas

Women Watching TV

Jaw-dropping landscapes and a dream team of Brazilian actresses are the core of this investigative Portuguese TV series available on Globo Play.

Taís Araujo, Leandra Leal, and Deborah Falabella, are the leaders of the NGO Aruana, for the preservation of the Amazon forest. Eventually, the three get in touch with news of water contamination of a local population and get to work. But they will have to face a wave of crimes and impunity when going against the interests of a millionaire’s mining enterprise.

Aruanas is a TV series full of action, politics, and environmental matters, but it’s also a great opportunity to get in touch with dialects of Portuguese and regional data that not even many Brazilians know.

Quote:
Hoje no Entre Pontos eu entrevisto o mediador de conflitos Caio Martins. Caio, eu sou uma profunda admiradora do seu trabalho e queria aproveitar a ocasião para falar um pouquinho sobre o Brasil: como você faria a mediação de conflito entre índios, fazendeiros e grileiros quando todos alegam ter direito ao mesmo pedaço de terra?

Translation:
“Today on Entre Pontos I’ll interview the conflicts mediator Caio Martins. Caio, I’m a fond admirer of your work and would like to use this occasion to talk something about Brazil: how would you mediate the conflict between Indians, farmers, and leaseholders, when all of them allege to have rights over the same piece of land?”

Vocabulary:

  • Admiradora (Admirer)
  • Entrevistar (To interview)
  • Grileiro (Leaseholder)

11. Watch Your Way to Portuguese Mastery

These fantastic TV shows to learn Portuguese will help you improve your vocabulary, learn valuable lessons, expand your knowledge on cultural matters, and make your Portuguese sound more natural. Don’t worry if you don’t pick up much in the first few episodes; it’s a piece-by-piece job. We at PortuguesePod101.com are here to help you learn Portuguese in a simple and fun way!

Before you go, let us know in the comments which of these Portuguese TV series you’re most excited to watch, and why! Did we miss any good ones on our list?

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Improve Your Language Skills!

What is Tiradentes Day in Brazil?

Joaquim Jose da Silva Xavier (Tiradentes) is considered a hero among Brazilians, and thus has a holiday commemorating the day that he was hanged a martyr. Tiradentes was a large supporter of and actor in the Minas Conspiracy, which ultimately sought to end the monarchy and win independence for Brazil.

Tiradentes Day is one of the most significant holidays in Brazil, seeing the high stakes that Tiradentes sought after for the country. As you read through this article, you’ll uncover layers of Brazil’s history and culture that are vital for your understanding!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Improve Your Language Skills!

1. Reading Practice: What is Tiradentes Day in Brazil?

Why is the holiday Tiradentes celebrated in Brazil? Read the Brazilian Portuguese text below to find out (you can find the English translation directly below it).

Joaquim José da Silva Xavier, mais conhecido como Tiradentes, foi o líder da Inconfidência Mineira, que aconteceu em Minas Gerais. O grupo, formado pela elite mineira, pretendia conquistar a liberdade e implantar um governo republicano. Mas um dia antes do movimento ser realizado, um dos inconfidentes delatou o grupo em troca do perdão por suas dívidas com a coroa.

Tiradentes assumiu responsabilidade total pela Inconfidência, e foi sentenciado pelo crime de traição contra o rei.

Devido ao crime gravíssimo, Tiradentes foi condenado à pena capital – a morte. Em 21 de abril de 1792, ele foi enforcado em praça pública na cidade do Rio de Janeiro.

Após executado, seu corpo foi esquartejado, e sua cabeça foi exposta em Vila Rica, e as demais partes distribuídas pela estrada que ligava o Rio de Janeiro a Minas Gerais, para intimidar a população e evitar novas revoltas. Sua casa foi queimada, seus bens confiscados, e jogaram sal no terreno para que nada lá brotasse.

Tiradentes é considerado herói nacional e o dia de sua morte é feriado em todo o país. Apesar disso, sua importância vem sendo esquecida, e a maioria das pessoas somente descansa e viaja nesse dia. A polícia civil e militar, onde Tiradentes é o patrono, celebra esse dia com homenagens a Tiradentes.

Joaquim José da Silva Xavier, commonly known as Tiradentes, was the leader of the Minas Conspiracy, which took place in Minas Gerais. The aim of the group, formed by the elite of Minas Gerais, was to win independence for Brazil and establish a republican government. However, one day before the conspirators were to put their plans into action, one of their number informed on them in exchange for exoneration from his debts against the crown.

Tiradentes assumed full responsibility for the Minas Conspiracy, and was sentenced for treason against the monarchy.

Because of how serious his crime, Tiradentes was sentenced to death. On April 21, 1792, he was hanged in a public square in Rio de Janeiro.

His body was quartered after execution, and his head was exhibited in Vila Rica, with his other body parts scattered along the road between Rio de Janeiro and Minas Gerais, to intimidate the population and discourage any more revolts. His house was torched, his property confiscated, and salt thrown on the ground so that nothing would grow there.

Tiradentes went down in national history as a martyr and the day of his death is fêted as a public holiday countrywide. Furthermore, his importance has never been forgotten, and most people set that day aside for rest or travel.

The civil and military police, who adopted Tiradentes as their patron, celebrate the day with tributes to Tiradentes.

2. When is the Tiradentes holiday?

April 21 is Tiradentes Day

Each year in Brazil, Tiradentes Day is celebrated on April 21. This April 21 holiday in Brazil commemorates the hero Tiradentes on the day he was hanged.

3. How is Tiradentes Day Celebrated?

Silhouette of Person Carrying Flag

Another key event in the story of Tiradentes, the Minas Conspiracy martyr, is the renaming of a town in the state of Minas Gerais in his honor. For Tiradentes Day, Brazil celebrates Conspiracy Week annually with various commemorative events.

The flag adopted by the state of Minas Gerais was designed by members of the Minas Conspiracy. On it is the Latin phrase “Libertas ainda que Tardia” or “Freedom though Late.”

4. Additional Information: Pulling Teeth!

Can you guess what Tiradentes’ profession was by his nickname?

The nickname Tiradentes derives from one of his occupations—dentistry. He also worked as a herdsman, miner, trader, political activist, and was in the military. But despite his nickname, he did not like pulling teeth!

5. Must-know Vocab

Brazilian Republic Symbol

Here’s some vocabulary you should know for Tiradentes Day in Brazil!

  • Tiradentes — “Tiradentes’ Day”
  • Tiradentes — “Tiradentes”
  • Inconfidência Mineira — “Minas Gerais Conspiracy”
  • Joaquim José da Silva Xavier — “Joaquim José da Silva Xavier”
  • Herói nacional — “National hero”
  • Vinte e um de abril — “April 21st”
  • Patrono da Polícia Militar — “Patron of the Military Police”
  • Mártir — “Martyr”
  • Enforcado — “Hanged”
  • Esquartejado — “Quartered”
  • República brasileira — “Brazilian Republic”

To hear each word pronounced, check out our Tiradentes’ Day vocabulary list. Here, you’ll find each word accompanied by an audio of its pronunciation.

Conclusion

We hope you enjoyed learning about Tiradentes Day with us! What do you think about the patron’s story? Let us know in the comments!

To learn even more about Brazilian culture and the Portuguese language, visit us at PortuguesePod101.com! We offer an array of insightful blog posts, free vocabulary lists, and an online community where you can discuss lessons with fellow Portuguese learners. You can also create a Premium Plus account to take advantage of our MyTeacher program, which allows you to learn Portuguese one-on-one with your own personal teacher!

Know that your seeds of hard work will soon grow skills and knowledge for you to reap in the near future. Before you know it, you’ll be speaking Portuguese like a native. And we’ll be here for you the whole time!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Improve Your Language Skills!

The Best Guide on How to Find Jobs in Brazil

A complete guide to find a job in Brazil. Destination: success!

You probably know somebody who’s studied abroad or who has plans to settle down in a foreign country. We live in a context of global connections, and the general trend is to strengthen bonds with people all around the world.

To bond successfully and settle down in Portuguese-speaking countries, one must go after Portuguese-speaking jobs. Though there are many work opportunities for foreigners and even tourists nowadays, there’s no substitute for knowing the language in order to work and find jobs in Brazil.

Do you need a Brazil work visa? What are your chances of landing Brazil expat jobs considering the job vacancy today? What are the main jobs in Brazil? The goal of this article is to reveal some Brazil job facts and some of the best and most useful tips to start working in Brazil. Here’s a complete guide to finding a job in Brazil.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Business Words and Phrases in Portuguese

Table of Contents

  1. Where to Find Work in Brazil as a Foreigner
  2. Types of Expatriate Jobs in Brazil
  3. How to Apply for Jobs in Brazil
  4. Foreigner-Friendly Jobs
  5. Blue-Collar Jobs
  6. Office Jobs
  7. One More Thing

1. Where to Find Work in Brazil as a Foreigner

Perhaps you’re not informed about Brazil’s economy, but the country has gone through a major crisis, from which it didn’t entirely recover. The latest labor reports show an unemployment rate of 11.8 percent in the country. 41.4 percent of the jobs are currently informal.

Brazil is struggling to improve its economic situation after its recession. The recent unemployment numbers are better than the last ones, though there’s still a long way to go.

All of this considered, why work in Brazil?

Even though the general conditions aren’t very smooth, there’s still plenty of Brazilian jobs for foreigners. So, don’t panic: there are ways to fund your life in Brazil.

But before moving to another country and trying your luck, there are some technical details to sort out. Namely, you should know about the requirements to work in Brazil.

Working Permit & Visa

So, who can work in Brazil?

Anyone who wants to work in Brazil needs to go through some paperwork and red tape, which in this case is the Brazil work visa application. It’s not much, but it’s necessary even if you only want to work there for a year or so.

A Passport

Papers, please!

Do I Need a Brazil Work Visa?

Yes, foreigners need a specific visa to work in Brazil. The concession of visas in Brazil depends on a local company hiring the foreigner. Visas can be temporary or permanent.

Citizens from MERCOSUL countries—Bolivia, Peru, Colombia, and Ecuador—benefit from different conditions for establishing residence and work in Brazil.

More information about the Brazil work visa application, and the whole process, can be obtained through the Labor Authority.

2. Types of Expatriate Jobs in Brazil

Done with the paperwork? Let’s look at the process of actually getting a job.

There are many types of work in Brazil for foreigners. One thing you should know is that the number and level of jobs available to you largely depends on how well you actually speak Portuguese. Knowledge of how and when to use idioms is a big plus!

The first careers we’ll look at are English jobs in Brazil and other foreign-friendly options. These are jobs in Brazil for English-speaking people mostly, as well as other foreigners who don’t speak Portuguese so well. In other words, beginners.

Then, there’s a list of jobs in Brazil for learners who have a deeper knowledge of the language—intermediate and advanced speakers. Portuguese jobs for these people can be found in various sectors.

If you need intensive training of Portuguese to achieve higher goals, then MyTeacher is the perfect tool for you: get private one-on-one help and guidance from your personal teacher and find your way to the best Portuguese jobs.

First, some more technical tips on how to get a job in Brazil.

3. How to Apply for Jobs in Brazil

The most useful tips to begin working in Brazil are those related to the form. That is, how to apply for jobs in Brazil using resumes, CVs, and cover letters that will be effective in the country.

The Correct CV to Apply for Jobs in Brazil

The first step is to know some details about how to elaborate a CV (resume) according to Brazilian preferences.

Unlike in some countries, candidates for jobs in Brazil normally don’t attach a photo to their CVs. The basic content for a CV should be:

  • Complete name and age
  • Contact information, including address
  • Working objectives
  • Past working experience and projects
  • Educational background
  • Useful abilities for the job

It’s preferable to keep your social media profiles “clean,” restricted to outsiders, or not even presented in your CV, depending on the type of work that you’re applying for. Reversely, you can present these social media profiles if they show important projects of yours.

Keep in mind that the Human Resources team will probably evaluate whatever information they can get about you.

The Power of Cover Letters

Many people don’t know the power of cover letters when it comes to working in Brazil. Sometimes even a good CV isn’t enough to display all your potential and your desire to work for someone.

Wondering how to get work in Brazil through a cover letter?

To show how strongly you want a job and just how qualified you are, the cover letter is a tool of great value. This is particularly true concerning office jobs. In case you don’t know, a cover letter is a short text in which the applicant can present information about his/her background and objectives for going after a specific job or enterprise. And it does this in a more personal way than the CV!

Normally, there are specific guidelines to follow when creating CVs. There are many ways to present a cover letter for different jobs in Brazil. General guidelines are:

  • Keep it simple
  • Keep it personal
  • Be creative, but don’t be rude

And finally: show strong relationships between your experience, your objectives, and the job. Don’t tell—show.

Someone Texting On a Phone

Electronic networking may lead to real-life results!

Remote Jobs in Brazil

Looking for Brazil online jobs, or other work you can do from home? There are some useful online tools for remote jobs in Brazil, especially for freelancers:

The Power of Networking

These remote possibilities are a good way to get in touch with other people. Nowadays, virtual interfaces are usually designed based on social media dynamics. Content is created and shared, and it tends to reach people you would never get to know in the “real” world.

This happens with job indications on the remote job platforms, and also in real life. For instance, there are many coworking offices in the country that can play a good role in making contact with other professionals. Google Campus and inovaBra are some examples.

There are more options like these for jobs in São Paulo, Brazil, but the reorganization of labor practices toward “open offices” will probably spread more intensely in the future.

Brazil Job Sites

Luckily, the modern world has many marvels that act as shortcuts for normally difficult situations. To more easily look for and attain jobs in Brazil, apply online! Many websites offer the great opportunity to apply for jobs in Brazil. Nowadays, they’re some of the most useful ways for getting a job anywhere.

Global websites such as Glassdoor and LinkedIn have active communities of users in Brazil. There are also local sites of this sort, such as:

Important note: Craigslist is not a popular site for job searching in Brazil.

These sites are simple to use and don’t require payment. They’re similar to each other, though each one has slight differences.

Catho, VAGAS, InfoJobs, and 99jobs are focused on traditional job vacancies: a corporate and stable job position. Trampos, on the other hand, compiles freelance gigs and other temporary jobs along with some more permanent ones.

4. Foreigner-Friendly Jobs

Brazilian jobs for English speakers may be the most foreigner-friendly ones today. For instance, in Brazil, teaching jobs are especially popular for those who can speak English, and there’s a growing number of clients in the teaching business.

These are the most common jobs for Americans in Brazil, and even English-speaking foreigners from other countries can attain these language-teaching jobs.

If you’re a native or experienced speaker of English, you may find work in schools and universities, or become a private teacher. Some of these may even be contract jobs. Contract jobs in Brazil are very interesting options because they imply more stability than informal jobs (which are more common in the country).

While English is probably the best option for teaching a language in Brazil, native speakers of other popular language may be able to find teaching jobs. In this case, it may be a good idea to research and get in contact with specialized language schools, teaching agencies, and even language-learning apps.

Hammock on a Beach

Working hard or hardly working?

Tourism Jobs in Brazil

Hotel jobs in Brazil are another good type of work for foreigners, especially in hostels and touristic locations. These may be the best jobs for Americans in Brazil in places of great natural beauty. Also, tourism jobs are the best way to meet new people, talk with them, and help them out.

Curiously enough, hostels are growing more popular in urban cities. The people who use these services are typically corporate tourists and travelers on a tight budget. Working in hostels is usually pretty flexible.

On one hand, this leads to “looser” schedules and working dynamics. On the other hand, it’s important to keep in mind that there’s currently a trend of employees working more and getting lower payments. This model may be fine for some people, but it sure isn’t for everyone.

Whether close to the beach, in the countryside, or in big urban centers, make sure to learn about the job location beforehand.

5. Blue-Collar Jobs

Blue-collar jobs are relatively common in Brazil, despite the slowing down of the country’s industrial sector. Manufacturing jobs in Brazil typically employ thousands of citizens.

Mining Jobs in Brazil

The easiest way to access Brazil mining jobs is to go straight to the source: direct contact with the mining companies. This industrial sector is vital in Brazil, and the biggest players in the market have webpages for applications and contact information on their websites.

Here are some of the biggest players in Brazil’s mining market:

Some of these companies also display vacancies on the main job websites.

Also, there are some portals and publications that display mining job opportunities. These include Notícias de Mineração Brasil and O Petróleo.

One interesting detail about mining jobs in Brazil is that there are many options spread around the country. Most careers in this country are concentrated in São Paulo, Brazil, but mining jobs can be found in numerous locations.

A Scene of Heavy Construction

Heavy industry still has a long way to go in Brazil.”

Construction Management Jobs in Brazil

Similar to mining jobs, construction management jobs in Brazil are part of the heavy industry.

Brazil is expecting growth in the construction industry in the coming years, so this may be a good time to look for opportunities directly through the websites of main construction firms in the country.

Aviation Jobs in Brazil

Aviation jobs are a common type of work in Brazil for English-speakers and those more versed in Portuguese alike. Pilots and stewards/stewardesses have more opportunities than ever to work in Brazil: the laws of the commercial aviation market have been altered to attract more players. Further, the trend for the near future is to have a plethora of flights and new routes for regional and transregional air transport.

6. Office Jobs

Man Working an Office Job

There’s a big concurrence for office jobs and places in the services sector.

Brazil Finance Jobs

The financial market in Brazil is a sector of immense potential. There’s still 45 million Brazilians out of the country’s banking system, which accounts for a money flow of roughly US$203.5 billion a year.

The concentration of banks in Brazil is notorious. There are only a few retail banks operating in the market, and a growing number of investing banks and funds.

The first thing you should know about finance jobs in Brazil is that a huge part of these workplaces are jobs in São Paulo. São Paulo is the financial capital and the biggest city of the country—and one of the ugliest. The prices are expensive, the public services aren’t good, and it’s very far away from nice beaches and other major tourist attractions that would normally attract expatriate workers.

But if you’re into urban ambiences and can tolerate their problems, perhaps São Paulo is the place for you. The best way to get Brazil finance jobs is through the job sites/networks mentioned at the beginning of this article.

Legal Jobs in Brazil

Brazil has the largest number of Law universities in the world. There are 1406 institutions of this type in the country, while the rest of the world accumulates 1200 Law universities.

So, there’s huge competition for legal jobs in Brazil. Lawyers and other legal professionals are more prone to succeed if they’re part of the law sector of an enterprise and can get a transfer to Brazil.

If not, corporate business (foreign companies and laws) and innovation (digital law and lawtechs, for instance) should be the focus of one’s job search. Migalhas, Conjur, and Jota are some of the biggest portals on law themes. They may lead to interesting local discussions, contacts, and job options.

Journalism Jobs in Brazil

Journalism jobs in Brazil are diversified like in other countries. This means that frontiers between journalism, entertainment, corporate communication, and press offices are fairly blurred.

A good starting point is Guia de Mídia. This website is a big index of Brazilian media across the country. Once you have the contact information of the newspaper, magazine, or radio, you can get in touch with them.

Social media also has a big impact in Brazil. Brazilians are “early adopters” of technological communication, which makes Facebook, WhatsApp, and Instagram a big deal in the country. So, there’s a high demand for people who can communicate properly in these media, selling products or reaching audiences, and analyzing data.

A Domestic Scene Being Filmed

Lights, camera… Action!

Film Jobs in Brazil

Film jobs in Brazil are becoming more and more popular through the freelance platforms and online video streaming platforms like Netflix, YouTube, and Amazon Prime.

The film industry is relatively closed or too informal. Video is now more accessible as a tool for sales than it was years ago, but you should know that most film jobs are in the Southeastern region of the country (Rio-São Paulo), and that networking is king for finding good opportunities in this sector.

ProductionHUB is a good site to start your search and identify film production companies in Brazil. If you’re a freelancer, the remote job websites mentioned earlier may also be a helpful source of jobs.

Electrical Engineering Jobs in Brazil

Project engineering, data centers, and software engineering are some popular electrical engineering options in Brazil. There’s still a high demand in the country for specialized technical engineering jobs, and a good electrical engineer will probably find many job offers.

If you’re interested in Brazil engineering jobs, job sites like Glassdoor and Google Careers are some options to help professionals find interesting opportunities.

Tech Jobs in Brazil

The first advantage of tech jobs in Brazil is the empirical nature of hiring. Showing involvement in good projects generally translates to employment.

The second advantage is that tech improvements are everywhere, in every industry, in every country. There’s a high demand and good pay. The obvious opened door toward tech jobs in Brazil is the offices of big tech companies (Google, Facebook, etc.). Game design is also getting big, especially in the states of São Paulo and Santa Catarina, with many job opportunities.

Other options for programmers and other tech professionals are the remote job sites and coworking spaces mentioned earlier in this article.

7. One More Thing

Finally, there’s another point to take into consideration when it comes to work in Brazil for foreigners.

We can conclude from the exposition of this article that there are many ways to fund your life in Brazil. But a learner of Portuguese should consider the advantages of pursuing part-time jobs vs. full-time jobs.

The answer for this choice is usually one’s personal take on the balance between flexibility of schedule and pay. Despite this equation, a student or a temporary traveler in Brazil should consider what options would be most practical for them, especially if they want to learn the language.

Apart from practicing Portuguese during work and leisure time, grammar studies and even cultural observation are important aspects of the learning experience and shouldn’t be neglected.

Whichever option you like better, PortuguesePod101 can provide all the necessary means to achieve your goals while learning Portuguese. Huge sets of lessons and interactive resources will boost your knowledge before and after you start working in Brazil.

Before you go, drop us a comment to let us know how you feel about your upcoming job search in Brazil. Do you feel more prepared, or is there still something you’re not sure about? We always love hearing from you, and helping the best we can!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Business Words and Phrases in Portuguese

The Brazil Carnival: How to Celebrate Carnaval De Brasil

Carnival is probably the most famous Brazilian holiday in the world. It’s also the largest “collective party” in the country.

Many people associate Carnaval with samba or Rio, but in this lesson, you will discover that Carnival is much more than that. We’ll tell you how Carnival is celebrated in other parts of Brazil and what we Brazilians normally do at this time.

As you learn more about Carnaval in Brazil (sometimes called El Carnaval Brazil), you’ll gain a deeper understanding of Brazilian and Portuguese culture. Thanks for letting PortuguesePod101.com be your guide! Let’s get started.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Improve Your Language Skills!

1. What is What is Carnaval in Brazil?

The Carnival festival in Brazil is a time of dancing and general fun before the upcoming Lent season. This holiday is widely celebrated around the world, but the Brazil Carnival experience puts a fascinating twist on celebrations you’ll find elsewhere.

From Portuguese Carnival masks to the unique music and dances, the Brazil Carneval is not something to be missed or easily forgotten.

2. When is Carnival in Brazil?

People Playing Drums

The date of the Carnival Season in Portugal varies each year, as it depends on the date of Easter. For your convenience, here’s a list of this holiday’s date for the next ten years:

  • 2019: March 4
  • 2020: February 24
  • 2021: February 15
  • 2022: January 31
  • 2023: February 20
  • 2024: February 12
  • 2025: March 3
  • 2026: February 16
  • 2027: February 8
  • 2028: February 28

Carnival is normally in mid-February. Even though some schools start their semester before Carnival, for the majority of students, the end of Carnival marks the true end of the summer holiday.

3. Reading Practice: How is Carnival Celebrated?

People Dancing Samba

Read the Portuguese text below to find out how the Carnival is celebrated in Brazil. You can find the English translation directly below it.

—–
Assim como muitas tradições brasileiras, o Carnaval chegou ao Brasil por meio dos portugueses, primeiro com o nome de entrudo, costume de brincar no período de carnaval, e depois bailes carnavalescos e carnavais de rua. No começo do século vinte as escolas de samba começaram a evoluir, e nas últimas décadas, algumas capitais construíram seus sambódromos, especialmente para o Carnaval.

Embora o Carnaval do Rio seja o mais conhecido mundialmente, o Carnaval de São Paulo, Salvador, Ouro Preto, Recife e Olinda, Fortaleza, Manaus e Florianópolis são muito renomados no país. No Rio e São Paulo, a principal atração é o desfile das escolas de samba da cidade. Em Salvador, milhares de foliões seguem os trios elétricos ao som de muito axé. Em Recife e Olinda, o ritmo é o frevo e maracatu. Cada cidade tem sua singularidade. Mas a ordem do dia é a mesma: se divertir e dançar muito!

—–

Like many other Brazilian traditions, Carnival came to Brazil through the Portuguese, first by the name of entrudo, which is the custom of playing during the period of Carnival, and afterwards Carnival-type dances and street carnivals. At the beginning of the twentieth century, the samba schools began to evolve, and in recent decades, some capital cities have built sambadromes, just for Carnival.

Even though Carnival in Rio is the most well known in the world, those in São Paulo, Salvador, Ouro Preto, Recife and Olinda, Fortaleza, Manaus, and Florianópolis are very well-known throughout the country. In Rio and São Paulo, the main attraction is the city’s samba schools parade. In Salvador, thousands of event participants follow large trucks playing axé music. In Recife and Olinda, the rhythm is frevo and maracatu. Each city has its own take on Carnival. But the order of the day is the same—have fun and dance a lot!

4. Additional Information

If you want to go to the large Brazilian Carnivals, often it is necessary to reserve your place as much as a year in advance.

But beyond those, each city also commemorates Carnival in its own way. In most cities, people walk through the streets, and some wear costumes (trust us, you won’t soon forget seeing a Brazilian Carnaval outfit!), to watch the samba schools parade, and also to dance, have fun, throw party foam on your friends and lose yourself in the revelry! Since Carnival is normally a prolonged holiday, many use that time to travel, generally to the coast.

5. Must-know Vocab

People Learning Samba

Here’s some vocabulary you should know for Carnival in Portugal!

  • Carnaval — “Carnival”
  • Axé — “Axé music”
  • Samba — “Samba”
  • Maracatu — “Maracatu”
  • Escola de samba — “Samba school”
  • Frevo — “Frevo”
  • Fantasia — “Costume”
  • Abadá — “Abadá”
  • Sambódromo — “Sambadrome”
  • Marchinha de carnaval — “Carnival little march”
  • Bloco carnavalesco — “Carnival block”
  • Rainha da bateria — “Queen of the drums at a Carnival parade”
  • Passista — “Person who dances samba at Carnival parades”
  • Pular carnaval — “Celebrate carnival”
  • Máscara — “Mask”
  • Desfile — “Parade”

If you want to hear each vocabulary word pronounced, check out our Portuguese Carnival vocabulary list. Here you’ll find each word accompanied by an audio of its pronunciation.

Conclusion

We hope you enjoyed learning about the Brazil Carnaval! Do you celebrate Carnival in your own country, or a similar holiday? Let us know in the comments!

To learn more about Brazilian culture and the Portuguese language, visit us at PortuguesePod101.com! We offer an array of insightful blog posts, free vocabulary lists, and an online community to discuss lessons with fellow Portuguese learners!

Keep up the hard work and continue delving into all things Portuguese. You’ll reap the benefits and talk like a native in no time!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Improve Your Language Skills!

How to Say I Love You in Portuguese – Romantic Word List

Do you often feel lonely and sad? Do you long for romance and are willing to do whatever it takes to meet that special person? Speaking another language could revolutionize your love life! So, why wait? Learning how to say ‘love’ in Portuguese could be just what you need to find it.

Or perhaps you were lucky, and have found your Portuguese partner already. Fantastic! Yet, a cross-cultural relationship comes with unique challenges. Learning how to speak your lover’s language will greatly improve your communication and enhance the relationship. At PortuguesePod101, our team will teach you all the words, quotes and phrases you need to woo your Portuguese lover with excellence! Our tutors provide personal assistance, with plenty of extra material available to make Portuguese dating easy for you.

Table of Contents

  1. Common Phrases You’ll Need for a Date
  2. The Most Romantic Ideas for a Date
  3. Must-know Valentine’s Day Vocabulary
  4. Portuguese Love Phrases for Valentine’s Day
  5. Portuguese Quotes about Love
  6. Marriage Proposal Lines
  7. 15 Most Common Break-Up Lines
  8. Will Falling in Love Help You Learn Portuguese Faster?

Start with a bonus, and download the ‘How To be a Good Lover Cheat Sheet’ for FREE! (Logged-In Member Only)

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to be a Good Lover in Portuguese

1. Common Phrases You’ll Need for a Date

So, you have met your Portuguese love interest. Congratulations! Who knows where this could take you…?! However, the two of you have just met and you’re not ready to say the Portuguese word for love just yet. Great, it is better to get to know him/her first. Wow your prospective love by using these Portuguese date phrases to set up a spectacular first date.

Portuguese Date Phrases

Would you like to go out to dinner with me?

  • Você gostaria de sair para jantar comigo?

The important question! In most cultures, this phrase indicates: ‘I’m romantically interested in you’. Flirting in Portuguese is no different, so don’t take your date to Mcdonald’s!

Are you free this weekend?

  • Você está livre neste fim de semana?

This is a preamble to asking your love interest on a date. If you get an immediate ‘Yes’, that’s good news!

Would you like to hang out with me?

  • Você gostaria de sair comigo?

You like her/him, but you’re not sure if there’s chemistry. Ask them to hang out first to see if a dinner date is next.

What time shall we meet tomorrow?

  • A que horas a gente se vê amanhã?

Set a time, and be sure to arrive early! Nothing spoils a potential relationship more than a tardy date.

Where shall we meet?

  • Aonde nos encontramos?

You can ask this, but also suggest a place.

You look great.

  • Você está ótimo.

A wonderful ice breaker! This phrase will help them relax a bit – they probably took great care to look their best just for you.

You are so cute.

  • Você é tão fofo.

If the two of you are getting on really well, this is a fun, flirtatious phrase to use.

What do you think of this place?

  • O que que você acha deste lugar?

This another good conversation starter. Show off your Portuguese language skills!

Can I see you again?

  • Posso te ver de novo?

So the date went really well – don’t waste time! Make sure you will see each other again.

Shall we go somewhere else?

  • Você quer ir para outro lugar?

If the place you meet at is not great, you can suggest going elsewhere. It is also a good question to follow the previous one. Variety is the spice of life!

I know a good place.

  • Eu conheço um lugar legal.

Use this with the previous question. However, don’t say if you don’t know a good place!

I will drive you home.

  • Eu te levo para casa.

If your date doesn’t have transport, this is a polite, considerate offer. However, don’t be offended if she/he turns you down on the first date. Especially a woman might not feel comfortable letting you drive her home when the two of you are still basically strangers.

That was a great evening.

  • Foi uma noite ótima.

This is a good phrase to end the evening with.

When can I see you again?

  • Quando eu posso te ver de novo?

If he/she replied ‘Yes’ to ‘Can I see you again?’, this is the next important question.

I’ll call you.

  • Eu te ligo.

Say this only if you really mean to do it. In many cultures, this could imply that you’re keeping the proverbial backdoor open.

Sneak Peek! Log in to Download this Cheat Sheet!Sneak Peek! Log in to Download this Cheat Sheet!

2. The Most Romantic Ideas for a Date

You learned all the Portuguese phrases to make a date – congratulations! Now you have to decide where to meet, which can be tricky. Discuss these options with your lover to gauge whether you like the same things. Check out romantic date ideas in Portuguese below!

Date Ideas in Portuguese

museum

  • museu

If you’re looking for unique date ideas that are fun but won’t break the bank, museums are the perfect spot! You won’t be running out of things to say in the conversations.

candlelit dinner

  • jantar à luz de velas

A candlelit dinner is perhaps best to reserve for when the relationship is getting serious. It’s very intimate, and says: “Romance!” It’s a fantastic choice if you’re sure you and your date are in love with each other!

go to the zoo

  • ir ao zoológico

This is a good choice for shy lovers who want to get the conversation going. Just make sure your date likes zoos, as some people dislike them. Maybe not for the first date, but this is also a great choice if your lover has children – you’ll win his/her adoration for inviting them along!

go for a long walk

  • fazer uma longa caminhada

Need to talk about serious stuff, or just want to relax with your date? Walking together is soothing, and a habit you can keep up together always! Just make sure it’s a beautiful walk that’s not too strenuous.

go to the opera

  • ir à ópera

This type of date should only be attempted if both of you love the opera. It can be a special treat, followed by a candlelit dinner!

go to the aquarium

  • ir ao aquário

Going to the aquarium is another good idea if you need topics for conversation, or if you need to impress your lover’s kids! Make sure your date doesn’t have a problem with aquariums.

walk on the beach

  • caminhar na praia

This can be a very romantic stroll, especially at night! The sea is often associated with romance and beauty.

have a picnic

  • fazer um piquenique

If you and your date need to get more comfortable together, this can be a fantastic date. Spending time in nature is soothing and calms the nerves.

cook a meal together

  • cozinhar uma refeição juntos

If you want to get an idea of your date’s true character in one go, this is an excellent date! You will quickly see if the two of you can work together in a confined space. If it works, it will be fantastic for the relationship and create a sense of intimacy. If not, you will probably part ways!

have dinner and see a movie

  • jantar e ver um filme

This is traditional date choice works perfectly well. Just make sure you and your date like the same kind of movies!

3. Must-know Valentine’s Day Vocabulary

Valentine's Day Words in Portuguese

Expressing your feelings honestly is very important in any relationship all year round. Yet, on Valentine’s Day you really want to shine. Impress your lover this Valentine’s with your excellent vocabulary, and make his/her day! We teach you, in fun, effective ways, the meanings of the words and how to pronounce them. You can also copy the characters and learn how to write ‘I love you’ in Portuguese – think how impressed your date will be!

4. Portuguese Love Phrases for Valentine’s Day

So, you now have the basic Valentine’s Day vocabulary under your belt. Well done! But, do you know how to say ‘I love you’ in Portuguese yet? Or perhaps you are still only friends. So, do you know how to say ‘I like you’ or ‘I have a crush on you’ in Portuguese? No? Don’t worry, here are all the love phrases you need to bowl over your Portuguese love on this special day!

Valentine's Day Words in Portuguese

I love you.

  • Eu te amo.

Saying ‘I love you’ in Portuguese carries the same weight as in all languages. Use this only if you’re sure and sincere about your feelings for your partner/friend.

You mean so much to me.

  • Você significa tanto para mim.

This is a beautiful expression of gratitude that will enhance any relationship! It makes the receiver feel appreciated and their efforts recognized.

Will you be my Valentine?

  • Você quer ser meu namorado?

With these words, you are taking your relationship to the next level! Or, if you have been a couple for a while, it shows that you still feel the romance. So, go for it!

You’re so beautiful.

  • Você é tão bonita.

If you don’t know how to say ‘You’re pretty’ in Portuguese, this is a good substitute, gentlemen!

I think of you as more than a friend.

  • Eu te considero mais que um amigo.

Say this if you are not yet sure that your romantic feelings are reciprocated. It is also a safe go-to if you’re unsure about the Portuguese dating culture.

A hundred hearts would be too few to carry all my love for you.

  • Cem corações seriam demasiado poucos para levar todo o meu amor por você.

You romantic you…! When your heart overflows with love, this would be the best phrase to use.

Love is just love. It can never be explained.

  • O amor é só amor. Ele nunca pode ser explicado.

If you fell in love unexpectedly or inexplicably, this one’s for you.

You’re so handsome.

  • Você é tão bonito.

Ladies, this phrase lets your Portuguese love know how much you appreciate his looks! Don’t be shy to use it; men like compliments too.

I’ve got a crush on you.

  • Eu tenho uma queda por você.

If you like someone, but you’re unsure about starting a relationship, it would be prudent to say this. It simply means that you like someone very, very much and think they’re amazing.

You make me want to be a better man.

  • Você me faz querer ser um homem melhor.

Gentlemen, don’t claim this phrase as your own! It hails from the movie ‘As Good as it Gets’, but it is sure to make your Portuguese girlfriend feel very special. Let her know that she inspires you!

Let all that you do be done in love.

  • Todas as vossas obras sejam feitas em amor.

We hope.

You are my sunshine, my love.

  • Você é o meu sol, o meu amor.

A compliment that lets your lover know they bring a special quality to your life. Really nice!

Words can’t describe my love for you.

  • Palavras não podem descrever o meu amor por você.

Better say this when you’re feeling serious about the relationship! It means that your feelings are very intense.

We were meant to be together.

  • Nós fomos feitos para ficar juntos.

This is a loving affirmation that shows you see a future together, and that you feel a special bond with your partner.

If you were thinking about someone while reading this, you’re definitely in love.

  • Se você estava pensando em alguém enquanto lia isso, você está definitivamente apaixonado.

Here’s something fun to tease your lover with. And hope he/she was thinking of you!

5. Portuguese Quotes about Love

Portuguese Love Quotes

You’re a love champ! You and your Portuguese lover are getting along fantastically, your dates are awesome, your Valentine’s Day together was spectacular, and you’re very much in love. Good for you! Here are some beautiful phrases of endearment in Portuguese that will remind him/her who is in your thoughts all the time.

6. Marriage Proposal Lines

Portuguese Marriage Proposal Lines

Wow. Your Portuguese lover is indeed the love of your life – congratulations! And may only happiness follow the two of you! In most traditions, the man asks the woman to marry; this is also the Portuguese custom. Here are a few sincere and romantic lines that will help you to ask your lady-love for her hand in marriage.

7. 15 Most Common Break-Up Lines

Portuguese Break-Up Lines

Instead of moving towards marriage or a long-term relationship, you find that the spark is not there for you. That is a pity! But even though breaking up is never easy, continuing a bad or unfulfilling relationship would be even harder. Remember to be kind to the person you are going to say goodbye to; respect and sensitivity cost nothing. Here are some phrases to help you break up gently.

  • We need to talk.
    • A gente precisa conversar.

    This is not really a break-up line, but it is a good conversation opener with a serious tone.

    It’s not you. It’s me.

    • Não é você. Sou eu.

    As long as you mean it, this can be a kind thing to say. It means that there’s nothing wrong with your Portuguese lover as a person, but that you need something different from a relationship.

    I’m just not ready for this kind of relationship.

    • É que eu não estou pronto para esse tipo de relacionamento.

    Things moved a bit fast and got too intense, too soon? Painful as it is, honesty is often the best way to break up with somebody.

    Let’s just be friends.

    • Vamos ser apenas amigos.

    If the relationship was very intense, and you have sent many ‘i love u’ texts in Portuguese, this would not be a good breakup line. Feelings need to calm down before you can be friends, if ever. If the relationship has not really developed yet, a friendship would be possible.

    I think we need a break.

    • Acho que a gente precisa dar um tempo.

    This is again honest, and to the point. No need to play with someone’s emotions by not letting them know how you feel. However, this could imply that you may fall in love with him/her again after a period of time, so use with discretion.

    You deserve better.

    • Você merece algo melhor.

    Yes, he/she probably deserves a better relationship if your own feelings have cooled down.

    We should start seeing other people.

    • A gente devia conhecer outras pessoas.

    This is probably the least gentle break-up phrase, so reserve it for a lover that doesn’t get the message!

    I need my space.

    • Eu preciso de espaço.

    When a person is too clingy or demanding, this would be an suitable break-up phrase. It is another good go-to for that lover who doesn’t get the message!

    I think we’re moving too fast.

    • Acho que estamos indo rápido demais.

    Say this if you want to keep the relationship, but need to slow down its progress a bit. It is also good if you feel things are getting too intense for your liking. However, it is not really a break-up line, so be careful not to mislead.

    I need to focus on my career.

    • Eu preciso focar na minha carreira.

    If you feel that you will not be able to give 100% in a relationship due to career demands, this is the phrase to use. It’s also good if you are unwilling to give up your career for a relationship.

    I’m not good enough for you.

    • Eu não sou bom o bastante para você.

    Say this only if you really believe it, or you’ll end up sounding false. Break-ups are usually hard for the receiving party, so don’t insult him/her with an insincere comment.

    I just don’t love you anymore.

    • É que eu não te amo mais.

    This harsh line is sometimes the best one to use if you are struggling to get through to a stubborn, clingy lover who won’t accept your break up. Use it as a last resort. Then switch your phone off and block their emails!

    We’re just not right for each other.

    • Nós não somos feitos um para o outro.

    If this is how you truly feel, you need to say it. Be kind, gentle and polite.

    It’s for the best.

    • É pro nosso bem.

    This phrase is called for if circumstances are difficult and the relationship is not progressing well. Love should enhance one’s life, not burden it!

    We’ve grown apart.

    • Nós nos tornamos distantes.

    Cross-cultural relationships are often long-distance ones, and it is easy to grow apart over time.

  • 8. Will Falling in Love help you Learn Portuguese faster?

    Most people will agree that the above statement is a no-brainer – of course it will! Your body will be flooded with feel-good hormones, which are superb motivators for anything. PortuguesePod101 is one of the best portals to help help make this a reality, so don’t hesitate to enroll now! Let’s quickly look at the reasons why falling in love will speed up your learning of the Portuguese language.

    Three Reasons Why Having a Lover will Help you Learn Portuguese Faster!

    null

    1- Being in a love relationship with your Portuguese speaking partner will immerse you in the culture
    PortuguesePod101 uses immersive methods and tools to teach you Portuguese, but having a relationship with a native speaker will be a very valuable addition to your learning experience! You will gain exposure to their world, realtime and vividly, which will make the language come alive even more for you. The experience is likely to expand your world-view, which should motivate you to learn Portuguese even faster.

    2- Having your Portuguese romantic partner will mean more opportunity to practice speaking
    Nothing beats continuous practice when learning a new language. Your partner will probably be very willing to assist you in this, as your enhanced Portuguese language skills will enhance the relationship. Communication is, after all, one of the most important pillars of a good partnership. Also, you will get to impress your lover with the knowledge gained through your studies – a win/win situation!

    3- A supportive Portuguese lover is likely to make a gentle, patient teacher and study aid!
    With his/her heart filled with love and goodwill for you, your Portuguese partner is likely to patiently and gently correct your mistakes when you speak. This goes not only for grammar, but also for accent and meaning. With his/her help, you could sound like a native in no time!

    Three Reasons Why PortuguesePod101 helps you learn Portuguese Even Faster when you’re In Love

    Start with a bonus, and download the ‘How To be a Good Lover Cheat Sheet’ for FREE! (Logged-In Member Only)

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to be a Good Lover in Portuguese

    1- All the Resources and Materials Will Help Both of You
    Falling in love with a man or woman speaking Portuguese is an opportunity for both of you to learn a new language! For this reason, every lesson, transcript, vocabulary list, and resource at PortuguesePod101 is translated into both English and Portuguese. So, while your partner can help you learn Portuguese faster, you can potentially also help him/her learn and master English!

    2- Lessons Are Designed to Help You Understand and Engage with Portuguese Culture
    At PortuguesePod101, our focus is to help our students learn practical vocabulary and phrases used by everyday people in Brazil. This means that, from your very first lesson, you can apply what you learn immediately! So, when your Portuguese partner wants to go out to a restaurant, play Pokemon Go, or attend just about any social function, you have the vocabulary and phrases necessary to have a great time!

    3- Access to Special Resources Dedicated to Romantic Portuguese Phrases
    You now have access to PortuguesePod101’s specially-developed sections and tools to teach you love words, phrases, and cultural insights to help you find and attract your Portuguese soul mate. A personal tutor will assist you to master these brilliantly – remember to invite him/her to your wedding!

    How to Celebrate April Fools’ Day in Portuguese

    How to Celebrate April Fools' Day in Portuguese!

    Most everyone is familiar with this day, as it is celebrated nearly everywhere the world. Yet, when exactly is April Fools’ Day? And where did April Fools come from? April Fools’ Day is observed on April 1st every year. This day of jokes and pranks is believed to have stemmed from the 16th-century calendar change in France, when New Year’s Day was moved from April 1 to January 1. This action was taken due to the adoption of the Gregorian calendar.

    However, a few people were resistant to the calendar change, so they continued to observe New Year’s Day on April 1st, rather than the new date. They were referred to as the “April Fools”, and others started playing mocking tricks on them. This custom endured, and is practiced to this day around the world!

    Table of Contents

    1. Top One Million Words You Need to Know for April Fools’ Day
    2. Portuguese Phrases You Can Use on April Fools’ Day
    3. Some of the Coolest April Fools’ Pranks To Play on Anybody
    4. How Can PortuguesePod101 Make Your April Fools’ Day Special?
    5. Top 1000 Most Useful Phrases in Portuguese – Testing New Technology

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Master A Language!

    1. Top One Million Words You Need to Know for April Fools’ Day

    Do you want to know how to say April Fools’ Day in Portuguese? Well, there are millions of ways and words, but here are the top one million Portuguese words you really need to know! Simply click this link. Here are some of them you will find useful:

    1. funny – engraçado
    2. lie – mentir
    3. fool – bobo
    4. deceptive – enganador
    5. April 1st – primeiro de abril
    6. surprise – surpreender
    7. prank – brincadeira
    8. play a joke – pregar uma peça
    9. humor – humor
    10. prankster – brincalhão
    11. sneaky – safado
    12. joke – piada
    13. joke – contar piada

    2. Portuguese Phrases You Can Use on April Fools’ Day

    Portuguese Phrases for April Fools' Day

    Don’t limit yourself to practical jokes – use these April Fools’ phrases in Portuguese to prank your favorite Portuguese speaking friend or colleague!

    1. I learned Portuguese in 1 month.
      • Aprendi português em 1 mês.
    2. All classes for today got canceled.
      • Todas as aulas de hoje foram canceladas.
    3. I’m sorry, but I’ve just broken your favorite pair of glasses.
      • Desculpa, é que eu quebrei os seus óculos favoritos.
    4. Someone has just hit your car.
      • Alguém acabou de bater no seu carro.
    5. I’m getting married.
      • Vou me casar.
    6. You won a free ticket.
      • Você ganhou um bilhete grátis.
    7. I saw your car being towed.
      • Eu vi o seu carro sendo rebocado.
    8. They’re giving away free gift cards in front of the building.
      • Eles estão dando vale-presentes de graça na frente do prédio.
    9. A handsome guy is waiting for you outside.
      • Um cara bonito está te esperando lá fora.
    10. A beautiful lady asked me to give this phone number to you.
      • Uma bela moça me pediu pra te dar esse número de telefone.
    11. Can you come downstairs? I have something special for you.
      • Você pode vir aqui embaixo? Tenho uma coisa especial para você.
    12. Thank you for your love letter this morning. I never could have guessed your feelings.
      • Obrigado pela sua carta de amor hoje de manhã. Eu nunca adivinharia os seus sentimentos.

    Choose your victims carefully, though; the idea is to get them to laugh with you, not to hurt their feelings or humiliate them in front of others. Be extra careful if you choose to play a prank on your boss – you don’t want to antagonize them with an inappropriate joke.

    3. Some of the Coolest April Fools’ Pranks To Play on Anybody

    Choose Bad or Good

    Right, now that you know the top million April Fools’ words in Portuguese, let’s look at some super pranks and tricks to play on friends, colleagues and family. Some April Fools ideas never grow old, while new ones are born every year.

    Never joke in such a way that it hurts anyone, or humiliates them badly in front of others – the idea is for everybody to laugh and enjoy the fun! Respect is still key, no matter what day of the year it is.

    Cockroach prank

    1- Infestation

    This trick is so simple, yet so creepy, it’s almost unbelievable. Take black paper, cut out the silhouette of a giant cockroach, a spider or another insect, and stick it inside the lampshade of a table lamp. When the lamp is switched on, it will look like a monstrous insect is sitting inside the lampshade. Or, get a whole lot of realistic-looking plastic insects, and spread them over a colleague’s desk and chair, or, at home, over the kids’ beds etc. Creep-factor: stellar.

    2- Which One Doesn’t Fit?

    Put the photo of a celebrity or a notorious politician in a frame, and take it to work on April Fools’ Day. Hang the photo on the staff picture wall, and wait. You’ll be surprised how long it can take for people to notice that one picture doesn’t fit.

    3- Something Weird in the Restroom

    At work, replace the air freshener in the restroom with something noxious like insect killer, oven cleaner or your own odious mixture in a spray bottle. Be sure to cover the bottle’s body so no one suspects a swap.

    Or paint a bar of soap with clear nail polish, and leave it at the hand wash basin. It will not lather.

    Or, if your workplace’s restroom has partitioned toilets with short doors, arrange jeans or trousers and shoes on all but one of the toilet covers, so it looks like every stall is occupied. Now wait for complaints, and see how long it takes for someone to figure out the April Fools’ Day prank. You’ll probably wish you had a camera inside the restroom. But, unless you don’t mind getting fired, don’t put your own recording device in there!

    Funny Face

    4- Call Me Funny

    Prepare and print out a few posters with the following instructions: Lion Roar Challenge! Call this number – 123-456-7890 – and leave your best lion’s roar as voicemail! Best roarer will be announced April 10 in the cafeteria. Prize: $100. (Lion’s roar is just an example; you can use any animal call, or even a movie character’s unique sound, such as Chewbacca from Star Wars. The weirder, the funnier. Obviously!) Put the posters up in the office where most of the staff is likely to see them. Now wait for the owner of the number to visit you with murderous intent. Have a conciliatory gift ready that’s not a prank.

    5- Minty Cookies

    This is another simple but hugely effective prank – simply separate iced cookies, scrape off the icing, and replace it with toothpaste. Serve during lunch or tea break at work, or put in your family’s lunch boxes. Be sure to take photos of your victim’s faces when they first bite into your April Fools’ cookies.

    6- Wild Shopping

    At your local grocer, place a realistic-looking plastic snake or spider among the fresh vegetables. Now wait around the corner for the first yell.

    7- The Oldest Trick in the Book

    Don’t forget probably the oldest, yet very effective April Fools’ joke in the book – smearing hand cream or Vaseline on a door handle that most staff, family or friends are likely to use. Yuck to the max!

    8- Sneeze On Me

    Another golden oldie is also gross, yet harmless and utterly satisfying as a prank. Fill a small spray bottle that you can easily conceal with water. Walk past a friend, colleague or one of your kids, and fake a sneeze while simultaneously spraying them with a bit of water. Expect to be called a totally disgusting person. Add a drop of lovely smelling essential oil to the water for extra confusion.

    9- Word Play Repairs

    Put a fresh leek in the hand wash basin at home or work, and then tell your housemates or colleagues this: “There’s a huge leak in the restroom/bathroom basin, it’s really serious. Please can someone go have a look?!” Expect exasperation and smiles all around. Note that this prank is only likely to work where people understand English well.

    10- Scary Face

    Print out a very scary face on an A4 sheet of paper, and place it in a colleague’s, or one of your kid’s drawers, so it’s the first thing they see when they open the drawer. You may not be very popular for a while.

    11- Wake Up To Madness

    Put foamy shaving cream, or real whipped cream on your hand, and wake your kid up by tickling their nose with it. As long as they get the joke, this could be a wonderful and fun way to start April Fools’ Day.

    Computer Prank

    12- Computer Prank

    This one’s fabulous, if you have a bit of time to fiddle with a colleague, friend or your kid’s computer. It is most effective on a computer where most of the icons they use are on the desktop background itself (as opposed to on the bottom task bar).

    Take and save a screenshot of their desktop with the icons. Set this screenshot as their background image. Now delete all the working icons. When they return to their computer, wait for the curses when no amount of clicking on the icons works.

    13- Monster Under the Cup

    This one will also work well anywhere people meet. Take a paper cup, and write the following on it in black pen: “Danger! Don’t lift, big spider underneath.” Place it upside-down on prominent flat surface, such as a kitchen counter, a colleague’s desk or a restaurant table. Expect some truly interesting responses.

    Door Prank

    14- Prank Door

    Write in large letters on a large and noticeable piece of paper: PUSH. Tape this notice on a door that should be pulled to open, and watch the hilarious struggle of those clever souls who actually read signs.

    4. How Can PortuguesePod101 Make Your April Fools’ Day Special?

    If you happen to visit Portuguese speaking countries like Brazil, or if you work for any Portuguese speaking company, knowing the above Portuguese prankster phrases can really lighten up your day. Showing you have a sense of humor can go a long way to cement good relationships in any situation. These phrases are at your disposal for free, as well as are these 100 core Portuguese words, which you will learn how to pronounce perfectly.

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Master A Language!

    Also, don’t stop at learning April Fools’ phrases in Portuguese – bone up your Portuguese language skills with these FREE key phrases. Yes, PortuguesePod101 doesn’t joke when it comes to effective, fun and easy learning.

    Now, as a bonus, test our super-learning technology, and learn the Top 1000 most useful phrases in Portuguese below! But that’s not all. Read on to learn how you can be eligible for large enrollment discounts at PortuguesePod101.

    5. Top 1000 Most Useful Phrases in Portuguese – testing new technology

    Help us by being a language guinea pig! Listen to this video above with embedded cutting-edge, frequency-based learning technology that enables you to learn large amounts of data in record time.

    • Note: This technology is in beta-phase of development, and we invite your input for fine-tuning.
    • To participate: Watch the video for instructions, and leave a comment to rate it. Your comment will make you eligible for large enrollment-fee discounts. To watch the video, please click the play button.

    Thank you for helping PortuguesePod101! We’re serious about making learning Portuguese fun.