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A Guide to Numbers in Portuguese to Make You a Perfect Ten

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Learning the numbers in Portuguese solves many problems. You can ask for caipirinhas (a Brazilian cocktail) for you and your buddies. Or count the goals in a soccer match. Or know how much a ticket from Sao Paulo to Rio will cost… You can also negotiate your salary, answer how many months (or years) you plan to stay in the country, and tell people your age.
Like in any other language, it’s important that you learn at least the numbers to ten in Portuguese right at the start. That will solve some communication problems when you’re speaking to a Brazilian or Portuguese person who doesn’t speak English.

Exciting, isn’t it? When do we begin? Well, sit down, take it easy, breathe—count to ten.

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Table of Contents

  1. Portuguese Numbers 1-10
  2. Portuguese Numbers 10-20
  3. Portuguese Numbers 10-100
  4. Numbers Up to 1000
  5. How to Give Your Phone Number
  6. How to Use Numbers When Shopping
  7. Saying Prices
  8. Learn Numbers in Portuguese and Much More with PortuguesePod101

1. Portuguese Numbers 1-10

First of all, we’ll go over the basic numbers that even kids know how to count. Baby steps before bigger plans. You’ll have to lay these bricks in order to reach bigger numerical structures.

Numbers in Portuguese are called números. If you’re familiar with any of the other Romance languages, this word may sound familiar to you. And so should this list of numbers in Portuguese from one to ten:

  • 1     Um
  • 2     Dois
  • 3     Três
  • 4     Quatro
  • 5     Cinco
  • 6     Seis
  • 7     Sete
  • 8     Oito
  • 9     Nove
  • 10     Dez

An interesting thing to note is that the number one in Portuguese transcends its function as a number for English speakers. Um is also used as an indefinite article in Portuguese, playing the role of “a(n)” in English.

So, when um acts as an indefinite article, it can be declined to its feminine form, based on the noun it’s referring to. Uma is the preferred form for counting feminine nouns. For instance:

  • Ele colheu uma banana da bananeira.
    “He picked a banana from the banana tree.”
  • Olho para a cesta e vejo: uma, duas, três maçãs…
    “I look at the basket and see: one, two, three apples…”
  • Rolamos sobre um monte de folhas.
    “We roll over a pile of leaves.”

The other number that can decline to its feminine form is dois (which is duas in its feminine form). However, it isn’t used as an indefinite article.

Oh! And since we’ve started from the basics, let’s not forget the smallest of all integers—zero. Well…you can call it zero. The only significant detail with this one is the pronunciation: the “e” sounds like it does in the word “bell.”

Child Studying 1+1=2 on Blackboard

Baby steps – We’ll get to the big ones soon.

2. Portuguese Numbers 10-20

Now that we’ve covered the very basics, giving you a strong foundation, we’re going to go through a rocky path of numbers that may sound pretty irregular to foreign speakers—but at least there aren’t many of them.

The thing is, they kind of make logical sense to foreigners, but not all of them.

From ten to twenty, half of the numbers in Portuguese sound irregular and the other half remind learners of the “-teen” numbers:

  • 10      Dez
  • 11      Onze
  • 12      Doze
  • 13      Treze
  • 14      Catorze or Quatorze
  • 15      Quinze
  • 16      Dezesseis
  • 17      Dezessete
  • 18      Dezoito
  • 19      Dezenove
  • 20      Vinte

Actually, you may see that 11 (onze), 12 (doze), 13 (treze), and 14 (quatorze) are a combination of the first four integers with dez (10). It may seem a little off the first time you hear them, but don’t let the “e” at the end of these numbers (or the different spelling) confuse you!

Numbers

3. Portuguese Numbers 10-100

Now, what about the large numbers in Portuguese? How do they work?

Portuguese is really logical sometimes (only sometimes), and luckily for you, that includes numbers. Once you’ve memorized 0-19, it gets simpler from 20 on.

Starting with 20 (vinte), all you have to do is “add” the numbers by placing “and” between the parts of the sum.

So, 21 is vinte e um (“twenty and one”), 22 is vinte e dois (“twenty and two”), and so on.

The logic behind the units is easier to get. To put this knowledge into practice, you can start by counting in Portuguese using the sets of tens:

  • 30      Trinta
  • 40      Quarenta
  • 50      Cinquenta
  • 60      Sessenta
  • 70      Setenta
  • 80      Oitenta
  • 90      Noventa
  • 100      Cem

These work just like vinte (20). For instance, 34 is trinta e quatro and 79 is setenta e nove.

When you get over 100, you just have to add more numbers the same way. For example: cento e cinquenta e seis is 156.

Man Trying to Figure Out Calculations

It’s just a matter of adding numbers up with figures above twenty.

4. Numbers Up to 1000

By now, counting numbers in Portuguese is probably as easy as eating breakfast for you. But we’re headed to the top! It’s time to cover numbers above 100 in Portuguese.

The following numbers in Brazilian Portuguese will help you keep track of your monthly expenses and read the cost of travel tickets. Once again, you can detect a pattern from hundred to hundred:

  • 100      Cem
  • 200      Duzentos
  • 300      Trezentos
  • 400      Quatrocentos
  • 500      Quinhentos
  • 600      Seiscentos
  • 700      Setecentos
  • 800      Oitocentos
  • 900      Novecentos
  • 1000      Mil

Doing Online Banking on Cellphone

Banking in Portuguese: The joy of counting sets of hundreds in a foreign language.

5. How to Give Your Phone Number

Learning numbers in Portuguese is very useful. But the key to understanding a new language in its subtleties is to interact with speakers of that language and to start networking. That means getting to know people. Going out is a great way to start taking new, adventurous steps into a foreign culture and meeting interesting people.

While you’re talking with new people, there may come a time when you want to exchange phone numbers with them. To help you be prepared for that situation, here are some phrases you can use to give your number in Portuguese, or to ask someone for theirs.

  • O meu número é…
    “My number is…”
  • Qual é o seu número de telefone?
    “What is your phone number?”
  • Me passa o seu número?
    “Can you give me your number?”

As for how to say numbers in Portuguese, the numbers are usually spoken individually in Brazil. In European countries, they’re grouped into sets of tens or hundreds.

  • O meu número é nove, sete, oito, seis, cinco, sete, sete, zero.
    “My number is 9786-5770.”

Eventually, though, digits can also be grouped into two sets. This usually happens when there’s a zero in the combination:

  • O meu número é nove, sete, oito, seis, cinco, sete, setenta.
    “My number is 9786-5770.”

Sure, there are some exceptions to this “formula” of Portuguese phone numbers, but there aren’t many. One exception would be the prefix 0800 in Brazil. This prefix is used for free hotlines, and it’s called zero oitocentos (“zero-eight hundred”).

Also, there’s a deep-rooted term in Brazil that’s frequently referred to in telephone numbers. This term is meia, and it can make a Portuguese-learner feel like an alien.

Meia is a word that means both “sock” and “half” in Portuguese. What number do you think it is?

If we’re dealing with telephone numbers, which range from 0 to 9, perhaps five would be a good approximation—but it isn’t. Meia is equivalent to six.

Indeed, it’s the abbreviation of meia dúzia (“half a dozen”), which equals six. The word is linked to how people used to measure things by the dozen, especially groceries. Even today, many egg cartons still hold a dozen eggs.

Most students learn this one the hard way, so consider this a valuable lesson!

Man Getting Woman’s Phone Number on Date

“Did you say meia?”

6. How to Use Numbers When Shopping

You may notice that when shopping in Brazil, it can be a struggle to get coins and small change from the cashier. Indeed, Brazilians don’t care much about using coins. The local coins, centavos, are represented after the comma in the price, but they aren’t taken seriously. Since the 1 centavo coin has been abolished, it’s impossible to pay exact prices that aren’t round (that don’t end with 5 or 0) with physical currency.

So, buyers and sellers often round up the price to a number ending in 0 or 5 to make it easier to get a proper real bill.

Here’s an example of a conversation you may have when shopping:

A: Boa tarde! Quanto está custando este celular novo da vitrine?
B: Este celular sai por R$850. A compra também pode ser parcelada em dez vezes de R$85.

A: “Good afternoon! How much does this new cell phone from the store display cost?”
B: “This cell phone costs R$850. We can also set the payment for ten installments of R$85.”

It’s common practice in Brazilian retail to set payment installments for a wide array of products. The payment plan can sometimes reach tens of installments, which may appear odd to many foreigners. However, these installment plans are very common, especially for electronic equipment, furniture, paying tuition, housing, cars, and loans.

A: Está um pouco caro para mim… Por quanto [dinheiro] você consegue me fazer estes dez livros?
B: O preço completo é de R$400, mas consigo fazer R$350.

A: “That’s a bit pricey… Can you lower the price for these ten books?”
B: “The full price would be R$400—I can make it R$350.”

Now let’s talk about discounts. Everybody is happy when they see that interesting items are on sale. But before you can really enjoy a sale, you have to understand its terms. If you see some indication of a 50% discount in the display window, but you’re not sure it applies to the shoes you want to buy, you can confirm the information with the seller by asking:

  • Este sapato também custa metade do preço na promoção?
    “Does this shoe also cost half the price on sale?”

In terms of fractions, metade (“half” ) is the only one you’ll see when shopping. Other discount amounts are usually given as a percentage.

7. Saying Prices

There’s a certain way to say numbers in Portuguese when giving prices—and it’s slightly different from how it’s done in English.

In Brazil, the values before and after the comma are joined by the word e (“and”). In Portugal, they’re joined by the word com (“with”).

Girl Trying on Nice Shoes at Store

“Este sapato também custa metade do preço na promoção?”

8. Learn Numbers in Portuguese and Much More with PortuguesePod101

Now you have the basic and intermediate figures, and that’s a good starting point when learning how to say numbers in Portuguese. If you decide to go even further and learn the sets of thousands, you’ll be able to negotiate payment for jobs, speak properly with your bank manager, and engage in some interesting calculations.

But what about the Portuguese numbers’ pronunciation? And other relevant cultural information you’ll need to understand the reality of Portuguese-speakers and their countries of origin?

Private lessons from a private teacher will increase your potential and let you learn more easily about numbers in Portuguese and a whole set of topics for everyday life. That’s the aim of lessons from PortuguesePod101.

The interface is simple to use and the content is planned and designed to retain your attention in a fun and constructive manner. Try and exercise your domain over numbers in Portuguese, and you’ll be on cloud nine!

Before you go, let us know in the comments how you’re doing with Portuguese numbers so far! We’ll be glad to answer any questions.

Happy Portuguese learning!

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How to Say Sorry in Portuguese

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Learn how to apologize in Portuguese – fast and accurately! PortuguesePod101 makes it easy for you to make amends. Start with a bonus, and download your FREE cheat sheet – How to Improve Your Portuguese Skills! (Logged-In Member Only)

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Table of Contents

  1. Common Ways to Say Sorry in Portuguese
  2. How To Refuse Something Politely in Portuguese
  3. Audio Lesson – Survival Phrases “How to Say Sorry”
  4. Why You Will NOT Be Sorry For Learning Portuguese through PortuguesePod101

1. Common Ways to Say Sorry in Portuguese

3 Ways to Say Sorry

Nobody’s perfect, not anywhere in the world. Everybody makes mistakes, and does and says regrettable things. Then it’s time to apologize, as saying ‘I’m sorry’ is not in vain. It can be very healing! Did you know that hearing a sincerely-meant apology can have a noticeable effect on a person’s body? Research has shown that it slows down breathing and heart rate, and even causes a drop in blood pressure.

Sometimes we cannot fix what’s broken, but we can make the experience a bit easier for anyone who suffered on account of our thoughtless actions or words.

Here are a number of ways to say sorry in Portuguese. In any language, just make sure you really mean it! An insincere apology will not go down well with anyone.

Woman Apologizing

Desculpa.
I’m sorry

These words should precede anything else you have to say. Use them sincerely and whenever you are clearly in the wrong. Acknowledging your guilt and apologizing for any wrongdoing will lift your spirits too! Often, remorse can eat away at us, and a simple ‘I’m sorry’, in Portuguese or any other language, can open the door for forgiveness and resolution of a bad situation. It can be a true gift!

Eu gostaria de me desculpar.
I would like to apologize.

This is a slightly more formal way to say ‘I’m sorry’ in Portuguese. Use this phrase if you’re addressing your superiors and/or elders.

Eu peço desculpas de coração.
I sincerely apologize.

If you feel strongly about your apology, this is another slightly more formal phrase to use. Keep it handy for graver errors, or you might come across as insincere!

Eu não vou mais fazer isso.
I won’t do it again.

A promise you can only make if you intend to keep it! Few things feel as bad as having to hear repeated apologies from someone for the same behavior – it means the ‘sorry’ is not sincere. Don’t be that person!

Eu vou me assegurar de não cometer este erro de novo.
I’ll make sure not to make this mistake again.

A beautifully strong phrase! Again, say this only if you mean it – not just in the moment, but always! A bit more formal, this is an especially good phrase to use when apologizing to superiors and/or elders. It will make an especially good impression at the workplace, where accountability is an excellent quality to display!

Eu não quis dizer isso.
I didn’t mean that.

This is a tricky one… What did you mean, then?! Clear up any confusion with sincerity. Also, use this phrase only if the harm done or mistake made was due to an accident, and then admit to thoughtlessness on your part, if appropriate.

É minha culpa.
It’s my fault.

If the fault is really yours, own up to it. You will gain respect in the eyes of others! However, don’t take the blame when it’s not truly yours. It won’t be good for you, and ultimately you will not be respected much for it.

Desculpa por ter sido egoísta.
I’m sorry for being selfish.

This is a good phrase to keep handy, especially for your close relationships. It is difficult to admit you’re selfish, isn’t it?! However, it’s good to know when to be honest. We get used to our loved ones, which often means we forget that they need our good manners and unselfish behavior just as much as strangers do.

Eu espero que você me perdoe.
I hope you will forgive me.

This is a polite and gentle wish that can smooth over many harsh feelings. It also shows that the other person’s opinion and forgiveness are important to you.

Eu assumo toda a responsabilidade.
I take full responsibility.

This strong statement is similar to admitting that an error or transgression was your fault. It speaks of courage and the willingness to take remedial action. Good one to use…if you mean it!

Eu não deveria ter feito isso.
I shouldn’t have done it.

This phrase is fine to use if you did or said something wrong. It shows, to an extent, your regret for having done or said what you did, and demonstrates that you understand your role in the mistake.

Desculpa por devolver o seu dinheiro atrasado.
Sorry for giving your money back late.

It’s rotten to have to loan money! Yet, it’s equally rotten to have to ask for the repayment of a loan. So, do your best not to pay late in the first place, but if it can’t be helped, this would be a good phrase to use!

Por favor, não fica bravo comigo.
Please don’t be mad at me.

Well, this is not a very advisable phrase to use if you are clearly in the wrong. If someone is justifiably angry with you, asking them not to be mad at you would be an unfair expectation. However, if you did something wrong by accident, and if the consequences were not too serious, this request would be OK.

Desculpa por chegar atrasada.
Sorry I’m late.

Punctuality is valued in most situations, but if you really cannot help being late, then apologize! This way you show respect for your host, and win their approval.

Peço desculpas por ter sido malvada com você.
I apologize for being mean to you.

Acknowledging your own meanness towards someone is no small thing, so good for you! Use this apology only if your intention is to seriously address your mean tendencies, or these words could become meaningless over time.

2. How To Refuse Something Politely in Portuguese

Woman Refusing

Congratulations! Now you know how to apologize in Portuguese! After you have apologized for a mistake, focus on fixing whatever you can, and don’t punish yourself over something that cannot be taken back or reversed. That’s healthy for you! Regret can eat away at the soul, and even destroy it. It is ultimately a useless emotion if it consumes you.

However, in language, we use apologies not only when we’ve transgressed or made mistakes. They come in handy in other situations too, when there has been no wrongdoing. Sometimes we need to express regret for having to refuse a gift, an offer, or an invitation. This can be somewhat tricky. Learn from specialists at PortuguesePod101 about how to use the correct Portuguese words for this kind of ‘sorry’!

3. Survival Phrases “How to Say Sorry”

Say Sorry

On the run and need a quick lesson on how to say sorry in Portuguese? Don’t fret, just listen and repeat! Click here for a recorded short lesson and learn how to give the perfect apology, with perfect pronunciation in Portuguese. A little can go a long way, and you will sound like a native!

4. Why You Will NOT Be Sorry For Learning Portuguese through PortuguesePod101

Man Looking at Computer

Online learning is here to stay, that’s a fact. In 2015, the Digital Learning Compass Partnership released a report based on surveys to determine online enrollment trends in US institutions for higher education. Thirty percent of all their students learned online! And the number is growing! However, how can you be sure you will not regret your choice of an online language learning school? First, look at the school’s credentials and what it has to offer…

  • Fun and Easy Learning: It’s a commonly-known fact that when learning is made easy and fun, student motivation rises. And as motivation rises, so does the effort to learn – what a beautiful cycle! PortuguesePod101’s language learning system is designed to get you speaking from the onset. Learn at your own convenience and pace with our short, effective and fun audio podcast lessons. Our Learning Center is comprehensive and state-of-the-art, with a vibrant user community to connect to! Our lessons are recorded with native hosts and voice actors, providing a diverse range of dialects in your lessons. You can be confident that native speakers will understand you when speaking Portuguese!
  • Innovative Learning Tools and Apps: We make it our priority to offer you the best learning tools! These include apps for iPhone, iPad, Android and Mac OSX; eBooks for Kindle, Nook, and iPad; audiobooks; Roku TV and so many more. This means that we took diverse lifestyles into account when we developed our courses, so you can learn anywhere, anytime on a device of your choice. How innovative!
  • Free Resources: Sharing is caring, and for this reason, we share many free resources with our students. For instance, start learning Portuguese with our basic online course by creating a lifetime account – for free! Also get free daily and iTunes lessons, free eBooks, free mobile apps, and free access to our blog and online community. Or how about free Vocabulary Lists? The Portuguese dictionary is for exclusive use by our students, also for free. There’s so much to love about PortuguesePod101…!
  • Live Hosts and One-on-One Learning: Knowledgeable, energetic hosts present recorded video lessons, and are available for live teaching experiences if you upgrade. This means that in the videos, you get to watch them pronounce those tongue-twisters, as if you’re learning live! Add octane to your learning by upgrading to Premium Plus, and learn two times faster. Your can have your very own Portuguese teacher always with you, ensuring that you learn what you need, when you need to – what a wonderful opportunity to master a new language in record time!
  • Start Where You Are: You don’t know a single Portuguese word? Not to worry, we’ve absolutely got this. Simply enroll in our Absolute Beginner Pathway and start speaking from Lesson 1! As your learning progresses, you can enroll in other pathways to match your Portuguese level, at your own pace, in your own time, in your own place!

After this lesson, you will know almost every ‘sorry for’ in Portuguese, but don’t let it be that you’re sorry for missing a great opportunity. Learning a new language can only enrich your life, and could even open doors towards great opportunities! So don’t wonder if you’ll regret enrolling in PortuguesePod101. It’s the most fun, easy way to learn Portuguese!

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Our Lady of Aparecida Day in Brazil

Each year, Brazilians take it upon themselves to celebrate and pay tribute to the patroness of Brazil, Our Lady of Aparecida. This is a major religious observance for Catholics, who often make a journey to the Basilica of Our Lady of Aparecida on this day.

In this article, you’ll learn about the Our Lady of Aparecida apparition, one of her most famous miracles, and the most common traditions associated with this holiday.

At PortuguesePod101.com, we hope to make every aspect of your language-learning journey both and informative!

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1. What is Our Lady of Aparecida Day?

On Our Lady of Aparecida Day, Brazil pays tribute to its patron saint, who is sometimes also referred to as the Virgin of Aparecida or the Lady of the Immaculate Conception.

But why is she considered such an important figure, and when did people start celebrated this holiday?

Our Lady of Aparecida Story

The image of the Saint was discovered in the present-day Paraíba River. Three fishermen were trying to fish to prepare a very important dinner. After many vain tries, they finally did catch something in their net—the image of the saint, without her head.

And the next time they let down their net? The fisherman caught her missing head. This event is often called the Our Lady of Aparecida apparition, and also explains why her name means “Appeared.” From this point on, many miracles were attributed to the patroness of Brazil, starting with the abundance of fish the fisherman caught afterwards.

The Saint stayed in Guaratinguetá with one of the fishermen, but with the increase in the number of followers, they had to build a prayer hall, afterwards a chapel, a church, and finally a basilica.

In 1928, the town around the church became the Aparecida municipality, and in 1930, Pope Pius XI proclaimed Our Lady Aparecida as Queen of Brazil and its patron. In the year 1980, Pope John Paul II consecrated the Basilica of Our Lady Aparecida as the largest Marian sanctuary in the world.

2. When Does Brazil Celebrate Our Lady of Aparecida Day?

October 12 Holiday

Each year, Brazilians celebrate Our Lady of Aparecida Day on October 12.

3. Traditions & Celebrations

During the day of Our Lady, more than 150,000 of the faithful will visit the Saint, thank her for blessings, and fulfill promises. Some of the faithful organize themselves into groups to go to the basilica of Our Lady of Aparecida, performing religious pilgrimages called romarias. There are groups that go by foot or by horse, and travel long distances to the city of Aparecida, where the basilica is located. And, naturally, the Catholic churches perform many masses to honor the patron saint of Brazil.

The majority of Brazilians are followers of Catholicism. In homage to Our Lady of Aparecida, Brazil women are often called Maria Aparecida or Aparecida, and their nicknames might be Cida or Cidinha.

4. Attacks on the Image

A Procession

The image of Our Lady has suffered a few attacks, such as one in 1978, when a young man knocked the image over. The pieces were gathered up and the image was restored after about two months of work. Today, a bulletproof dome protects the image.

5. Useful Vocabulary for Our Lady of Aparecida Day

Patroness of Brazil

Here’s the essential vocabulary you need to know for Our Lady of Aparecida Day in Brazil!

  • Procissão — “Procession”
  • Peregrinação — “Pilgrimage”
  • Padroeira do Brasil — “Patroness of Brazil”
  • Doze de outubro — “October 12”
  • Consagração à Nossa Senhora Aparecida — “Consecration to Our Lady of Aparecida”
  • Cavalgada — “Cavalcade”
  • Caravana — “Caravan”
  • Basílica de Nossa Senhora Aparecida — “Basilica of the National Shrine of Our Lady Aparecida”
  • Missa — “Mass”
  • Orar — “Pray”
  • Dia de Nossa Senhora — “Our Lady of Aparecida Day”
  • Nossa Senhora Aparecida — “Our Lady of Aparecida”
  • Rainha do Brasil — “Queen of Brazil”
  • Dia da Mãe de Jesus — “Day of the Mother of Jesus”
  • Milagre — “Miracle”
  • Santa — “Saint”

To hear each of these vocabulary words pronounced, alongside relevant images, check out the Our Lady of Aparecida Day vocabulary list on our website!

How PortuguesePod101 Can Help You Learn Brazilian Culture

We hope you enjoyed learning about Our Lady of Aparecida Day with us, and that you learned something new. Is there a patron of your country, or a highly regarded figure it celebrates? Let us know in the comments!

To continue learning about Brazilian culture and the Portuguese language, continue exploring PortuguesePod101.com. We provide an array of fun and effective learning tools for every learner, at every level:

  • Insightful blog posts on a range of cultural and language-related topics
  • Free vocabulary lists covering a variety of topics and themes
  • Podcasts and videos to improve your listening and pronunciation skills
  • Mobile apps to learn Portuguese anywhere, on your own time
  • Much, much more!

For an even more enhanced learning experience, be sure to upgrade to Premium Plus to take advantage of our MyTeacher program. Doing so will give you access to your own Portuguese tutor, who will help you develop a learning plan based on your needs and goals.

At PortuguesePod101, we know that you can master the language and culture of Brazil, and we care about your learning experience! Know that your hard work will pay off, and we’ll be here with help and guidance every step of the way.

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The Independence Day of Brazil: History & Celebrations

Did you know that Brazil is the only country in the Americas that uses Portuguese as its national language? This is because, for nearly three-hundred years, Portugal colonized Brazil. In 1822, freedom and independence finally became a realistic goal for Brazil, and as you can imagine, Brazil’s Independence Day is the country’s most important holiday.

How did Brazil gain its independence after so long a colonial period? In this article, you’ll learn about the history behind the Brazil Day of Independence, as well as Brazil Independence Day celebrations.

At PortuguesePod101.com, we hope to make every aspect of your learning journey both fun and informative. So let’s get started!

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1. What is Brazil’s Independence Day?

Brazil was a colony of Portugal for 285 years. However, when Napoleon invaded Portugal in 1815, the Portuguese court was forced to move to Rio de Janeiro, thus creating the United Kingdom of Portugal, Brazil, and the Algarve.

The Portuguese Court remained in Brazil until 1820, when the Liberal Revolution of Porto in Portugal forced King John to return to Europe. The Portuguese Government sought to make Brazil a colony once again, but the country was never to return to its former colonial status.

In 1822, a Court Order was issued to Pedro de Alcântara, prince regent of Brazil, for his return to Portugal. However, Pedro was petitioned to stay by the Brazilian people and decided accordingly to remain in Brazil. The day of his decision became known as the Dia do Fico (I’ll Stay Day), marking the first step toward the country’s independence.

Seeing that independence was inevitable, on September 7, 1822, after receiving a letter from his father demanding his return to Portugal, Pedro declared Brazil’s independence on the banks of the Ipiranga River with the famous words “Independence or Death!”

2. When is the Independence Day of Brazil?

Independence Day on September 7

Each year, Brazil celebrates its Independence Day on September 7.

3. Brazil Independence Day Celebrations

This holiday is also known as the Homeland Day or Seventh of September Day.

On Independence Day, Brazil celebrations throughout the country include civilian-military patriotic parades in all the city centers. Various public and military colleges participate in these parades.

The most famous of these celebrations is that of Brasília, held at the Esplanade of the Ministries, in the presence of the President of the Republic. In general, this event gains an audience of about fifty-thousand people.

And for Brazilians outside Brazil? The Brazilian Day is also celebrated worldwide, usually during the month of September, as an event to commemorate the independence of Brazil, accompanied by much Brazilian music and food.

4. How Did Brazil Get its Name?

A Marching Band

Do you know where the name of Brazil comes from?

It comes from the name of a tree called Brazilwood that is native to the Atlantic Forest. Its wood is reddish in color and used to be used for dyeing textiles, but today this tree is under risk of extinction.

5. Vocabulary to Know for Brazil’s Independence Day

Brazil's Flag on Map of Brazil

Here’s some vocabulary you need to know for Brazil’s Independence Day!

  • Dia da independência — “Independence Day”
  • Dia da independência do Brasil — “Independence Day of Brazil”
  • Banda — “Band”
  • Desfile — “Parade”
  • Sete de setembro — “September 7”
  • Discurso do presidente — “president’s speech”
  • Semana da Pátria — “Motherland Week”
  • Pátria — “Motherland”
  • Independência ou Morte! — “Independence or Death!”
  • Independência — “Independence”
  • Hastear a bandeira — “Hoist the flag”
  • Hino da Independência do Brasil — “Independence Anthem

To hear each of these Portuguese vocabulary words pronounced, check out our Independence Day of Brazil vocabulary list!

How PortuguesePod101 Can Help You Learn About Brazilian Culture

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A Comprehensive Guide to Body Language in Brazil

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Portuguese is a complex language and people who are learning how to speak it often complain about its difficulty. Well, besides the verbs, adverbs, and syntax construction, there’s also the nonverbal communication in Brazil that’s pretty rich.

Luckily for you, we’re here to help you dominate the body language in Brazil. As you might know, Brazilians are particularly expressive with their hands, so we’ll be looking at the most common Brazilian hand gestures in addition to other body gestures.

In this article, we’ll explain what the offensive hand gestures in Brazil are and much more.

You can approve of something, disapprove, tell that you’re in trouble, allow someone to come in, say hello, and so much more without using words. You’ll see exactly how in a bit.

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Table of Contents

  1. Body Postures
  2. Hand Gestures in Brazil
  3. Facial Expressions and Another Portuguese Gesture Tip
  4. Conclusion

1. Body Postures

There are plenty of Portuguese body gestures, and the best way to start this concise guide is by analyzing the body language and gestures in Brazil that are easiest to identify. The focus of these following postures is the movement of the torso and the limbs.

Whether it’s the full torso or just part of it, these postures will be more pronounced than any other types of Brazil nonverbal communication.

Man in White T-shirt Pointing to His Torso

1- “What can I do?”

O que posso fazer?

You had a huge problem to solve but couldn’t handle it. Oh no… In fact, everything went wrong and there’s nothing you can do about it. Who would have thought? What can you do now?

Nothing. Unfortunately, that’s the role you’ll play from now on. But the impotence of action is sometimes too intense to put into words. So, what gesture in Brazil could express this? A passive shrug of the shoulders with the palms of your hands facing up.

2- “Come here, you!”

Vem cá

Long-time friendships are the best. It’s incredible how there are people in this world who are so easy-going, you could see them every single day and never get bored of their company.

When you get in touch with a long-time friend or someone you really care about in Brazil, don’t be shy: spread your arms open from a short distance, just like you want to hug someone.

This may be a prelude to a hug or just symbolize the affection you feel for them even before the meeting. If you want to do the gesture and run for a hug like in a slow-motion scene from a movie, go for it—this is one of the appropriate gestures in Brazil from the list. So, you won’t be misunderstood, except if you scream in their direction or do something alarming.

3- “Do you want a piece of me?”

Quer brigar?

If you’re not prone to fighting people, perhaps you should avoid this Brazilian gesture. At least, you should learn to identify it for safety reasons: a person faces you with open arms, chest puffed and head up. I’m deeply sorry to say this, but this person is willing to beat you up.

This is a notoriously classic posture in bars and pubs in Brazil after two in the morning. If you happen to get a glimpse of this cockfight routine and want to signal “peace,” don’t imitate a dove with your hand. Instead, lift your hands up, showing them your palms. Show that you’re not armed or willing to punch anyone.

Also, get some help from your friends. After all, it’s past two in the morning in a bar and this guy is an idiot.

4- “The banana”

Vai pra (aquele lugar)

The gesture popularly known as “the banana” consists of connecting your forearms in front of your face in the shape of the letter “L” or a cross. Though the cross may lead to a Christian reference or merciful meaning in the mind of the foreigner, it’s not the way it goes.

In fact, it’s the complete opposite—this is one of the bad gestures in Brazil. To “give someone a banana” is an offensive gesture and can be translated as “back off, fool,” if we’re keeping this article in the polite register.

2. Hand Gestures in Brazil

Hand Gestures

Not many people think about it, but hands are very often used as a media to communicate messages. Torso and limb gestures tend to depict graphically something the person is willing to do. Faces show emotions that are usually easy to interpret.

Hands, on the other hand (no pun intended), are closer to metaphors. Since metaphors are very much linked to social context and specific cultural backgrounds, hand gestures are the hardest for foreigners to “read.”

We’ve gathered a lot of Portuguese hand gestures so that you don’t look like an alien, while everyone else reacts to them properly.

1- Positive and Negative

These are more or less universal classics: thumbs up and thumbs down. Thumbs up equals an affirmative response, and thumbs down equals a negative response.

Many people trace the origin of this gesture to the times of the Roman emperors. You may have seen it in the movie Gladiator as a sign of mercy (thumbs up) or execution (thumbs down) for the fighters in the Colosseum.

Many historians understand this as a failed depiction of the sign, which was initially spread by the “Pollice verso” painting by Jean Leon-Jerome. Despite that, many countries use these gestures in the same way.

Still, there are accounts of the thumbs as offensive responses in many countries (like Greece). But Brazil, Portugal, Angola, and other Portuguese-speaking countries don’t fit in this group of nations.

2- So-so

Mais ou menos

The thumbs express “Affirmative” and “Negative.” But the world isn’t a black and white picture, and is instead filled with an immense palette of middle tones.

So, how do you express “more or less?”

To do the so-so sign, open one of your hands with its palm facing you. Then rotate it laterally using the wrist as the axis and rotate it back a couple of times like it’s trembling.

3- You are finished!!

This is another brawling gesture: one palm is open while the other one is closed in a fist, hitting the open palm with your knuckles.

This isn’t rocket science, but we’ll break it down to eliminate any kind of doubt. The open palm is a symbol for your beautiful face. The clenched fist is the messenger’s fist, literally (or perhaps their knee or foot).

The intensity of the hit is the violence the person is willing to inflict upon you.

We’ve already read you the message, now it’s up to you to sort out this situation…

4- “Come in” or “you are allowed to get in”

How do you know if you’re welcome in somebody’s house? Apart from knowing the person and getting invited in the first place, there’s a simple hand gesture in Brazil that will show you they really mean to allow you into their home.

If you notice their hand open with the fingers moving in their direction, this is a good sign. It’s like the person is waving their hands from you into their homes. Come on in, let’s have a cup of coffee!

5- “Go away”

You’ve learned how to identify that you’re welcome. Now, you must know how to tell if you should leave.

If a person waves their hand like in the “come in” gesture but in the opposite direction, they’re telling you to go away or get out, probably angrily. Sorry, mate.

6- Hang loose

Hawaii is a long way from Brazil, but the natives are enthusiasts of the “hang loose” gesture. In case you’re not familiar with it, the “hang loose” gesture is very popular among surfers in Hawaii and is linked to a message of “peace” or “taking it easy.” It can also show approval.

It also grew popular among some of Brazil’s top athletes, such as the tennis player Guga and the football player Ronaldinho—it’s now immortalized as “Ronaldinho’s famous gesture” in MC Bin Laden’s funk tune. So, now we consider it one of the Portuguese hand gestures.

To make “Ronaldinho’s famous gesture,” make a fist. Then, move the thumb and the little finger away from the fist, horizontally. There, you have it.

7- Knock on wood!

A Wooden Drawer

This one is a very superstitious gesture. When you say something that you don’t want to happen, you knock on wood (a table or any other surface) to repel the hypothesis of this event happening.

According to a scholar from the Pontifícia Universidade Católica from São Paulo, the gesture was originally a request for forgiveness of native people of the American continent and other populations to their gods—who supposedly lived inside logs and trees.

A Goat with Long Horns

8- You’ve been cheated—sucks to be you!

This is a common gesture among Mediterranean people, and also among Brazilians who want to joke with someone about getting cheated on by their spouses – another example of offensive gestures in Brazil.

“The bull” and horns are symbols of the person who’s being cheated on. The word used to refer to this person is corno or corna (literally, “horned”).

This shameful situation is translated into a hand gesture of…horns. That is, a clenched fist with the little finger and the index finger up. It can also be done by lifting both index fingers and placing them like horns on your head.

9- What the…?

You’ve read about Portuguese hand gestures, but what about Italian gestures that are part of Brazil nonverbal communication?

Historically, Brazil was a major destination for all kinds of immigrants. The building of Brazilian industry, the substitution of slave work for paid work, and the modern country wouldn’t be possible without the presence of huge numbers of immigrants.

Among these, the Italians played a special role. The Italian immigration to Brazil began around 1870 and mobilized thousands of people up until around the rise of Mussolini in the 1920s.

So, Italian cultural traits and gestures have been incorporated into Brazilian culture. One of the most famous is the ma che, meaning “what the…?” or “what are you saying?” That’s how you should interpret this gesture if the person unites the point of their fingers, with their fingertips pointing upwards.

Whether the gesture is used as an honest question or the person is challenging you because of something foolish you’ve said is a matter of interpreting the context and their faces.

10- Middle finger up

A final example of rude hand gestures in Brazil is a universal classic. This is another American gesture that’s offensive in Brazil and probably anywhere in the world.

So, if someone shows you the middle finger, that means exactly what you thought.

3. Facial Expressions and Another Portuguese Gesture Tip

Facial expressions are relatively universal. There are scientific studies that show correct recognition rates of facial expressions above seventy percent of the sample audience.

Still, some body language in Brazil is linked to specific use of facial expressions.

Additionally, we’ll provide a useful tip about the use of body language and gestures in Brazil.

1- Put a smile on your face

A Large Group of People Smiling

It may sound strange to you, but the smile is a required mask to wear in Brazil. To show a smile and a good mood is important in social occasions.

You won’t have a lot of success flirting with only words—your smile should be the starting point. Also, smiling is fundamental for nonverbal communication in Brazilian business.

2- Different country, shorter distances

Proxemics, developed by anthropologist Edward T. Hall, is the study of how humans use space and its effects on behavior. It presents an explanation for the relationship between two human beings.

The distance between bodies can be divided into concentric areas that “describe” the interaction as intimate, personal, social, or public.

The interesting part of this topic is that this distance is conventional, meaning that the areas vary according to cultures and countries.

Typically, Brazilians tend to interact more closely than Americans or Europeans, even if they maintain “social” and “public” relations (not “intimate” or “personal”).

Without knowing this, some people might feel alarmed by the use of body gestures in Brazil at specific distances, or simply find it strange. Keep this information in mind and try to figure out the “correct” distances in your interactions.

4. Conclusion

How many of these Brazilian gestures did you know already? Are any of these new to you? We look forward to hearing from you in the comments section!

Portuguese gestures aren’t hard to master, but they demand some observation effort and practice. Luckily, this guide on Brazil nonverbal communication is a good starting point for foreigners who study Portuguese and have to figure out Brazilian habits.

Another excellent help for Portuguese learners is PortuguesePod101. The website gathers lessons, vocabulary tips, and many other useful informational tools in a dynamic and didactic form for speakers of all levels. From business body language in Brazil to the first baby steps in Portuguese language-learning, go to PortuguesePod101.com!

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Step Up Your Texting Game: A Guide to Portuguese Slang

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Did you know that Brazil is the country with the fourth-largest number of Internet users in the world? Take that huge number of people online, add to it the natural creativity and humor of Brazilians, and you get a whole new world of Portuguese slang and expressions!

Some Brazilian internet slang is more common with the younger crowds, while other slang phrases are used by people of all ages. Besides that, many expressions born online and in memes end up in the daily vocabulary of Brazilians, even if just for a few months. In this article, we’ll focus more on long-lasting expressions, abbreviations, and slang words. But if you’re curious enough, you can always continue keeping up-to-date with new memes and engage with Portuguese speakers online.

To make sure you’re up-to-speed with all the abbreviations, codes, and expressions in the Brazilian internet scene, be sure to check this guide and come back whenever you need to. After going through this guide, you’ll be able to handle your internet-based conversations and understand all the Brazilian online gírias, or “slang,” like a local!

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Table of Contents

  1. Abbreviations Used in Portuguese Texting
  2. Laughing the Brazilian Way
  3. Portuguese Internet Slang Derived from English
  4. Internet Slangs Popular on Social Media
  5. Popular Emojis in Brazil
  6. Learn More Portuguese with PortuguesePod101

1. Abbreviations Used in Portuguese Texting

Man on His Laptop

Vc tá no trabalho hj? ( “Are you at work today?” )

Texting is all about speed in Brazil. Abbreviations are everywhere, since they make it much quicker to write sentences. In Portuguese, it works the same way it does in English: we make the words smaller by substituting whole syllables for just one or two letters.

1 – Basic Words

Texting Slang

The most commonly used abbreviations in Portuguese text slang are used by people of all ages in Brazil, and can be seen everywhere online from social media comments to Whatsapp messages. Considering the huge number of Brazilians connected to the internet, chances are you’ll encounter these abbreviations in your next text conversation!

Abbreviation Stands for Translation Example
vc / cê / c você “You” [singular] Vc vai?
“Are you going?”
vcs vocês “You” [plural] Vcs já sabem
“You already know.”
ñ / n não “No” Ñ sei
“I don’t know.”
bj / bjo beijo “Kiss” Manda um bj pra ele
“Send him a kiss.”
bjs / bjos beijos “Kisses” Tchau, bjos
“Bye, kisses.”
bjks beijocas “Small kisses” Até mais, bjks
“See you, kisses.”
td tudo “All” / “Everything” Td bem?
“How are you?”
mt muito “A lot” / “Very” / “Much” / “Many” Mt lindo
“Very beautiful”
oq o quê “What” Vai fazer oq amanhã?
“What will you do tomorrow?”
q que “That” Ele disse q não viria
“He said that he wouldn’t come.”
pq por que / por quê / porque / porquê “Why” / “Because” E pq ele não veio?
“Why didn’t he come?”
sdd / sdds saudade / saudades There isn’t a translation for this word! But it means something similar to “miss you.” Oi amiga, sdds!
“Hi friend, miss you.”
kd cadê “Where” Kd vc, não te vejo!
“Where are you, I can’t see you!”
tbm / tb também “Too” / “As well” Eu vou tbm
“I’ll go too.”
vdd verdade “True” É vdd?
“Is it true?”
ctz certeza “Certain” / “For sure” É vdd, ctz
“It’s true, for sure.”
cmg comigo “With me” Ela tá cmg
“She is with me.”
ctg contigo “With you” Ele tá ctg?
“Is he with you?”
ngn ninguém “No one” Não tem ngn na aula
“There is no one in class.”
qto quanto “How much” Qto custa?
“How much does it cost?”
qdo / qnd / qd quando “When” Qdo vamos?
“When are we going?”
gnt gente “People” / “Guys” Tem mt gnt aqui
“There are a lot of people here.”

Gnt, vamos!
“Guys, let’s go!”

msm mesmo “Same” Digo o msm
“I say the same.”
add adicionar “To add” (on social media) Me add no Face
“Add me on Facebook.”
qq qualquer “Any” Eu posso ir qq hora
“I can go any time.”
hj hoje “Today” Hj é feriado
“Today is a holiday.”
eh é “Is” A festa eh hj?
“Is the party today?”
neh “Isn’t it” Legal, neh?
“Cool, isn’t it?”
soh “Only” / “Just” / “Alone” Soh curiosidade
“Just curiosity”
d+ demais “Cool” / “Awesome” / “Too much” Que d+
“That’s awesome.”

Sdds d+
“Miss you too much.”

t+ até mais “See you soon” Beijos, t+
“Kisses, see you.”
uau onomatopoeia “Wow” Uau, sério?
“Wow, really?”

Man Checking Wristwatch

Man checking wristwatch

2 – Abbreviations of Expressions

The following abbreviations are a bit more popular among younger people. These are common Brazilian Portuguese text slang expressions that are used online, on social media, and when texting!

Abbreviation Stands for Translation Example/Explanation
mds Meu Deus “My God” / “OMG” Mds, é vdd?
“OMG, is it true?”
sqn só que não Similar to “Said no one ever” Amo segundas, sqn
“I love Mondays, said no one ever.”
ac acompanhando “Following” This is used in comments on Facebook, when you want to continue reading the comments in a post.
tmj (es)tamo(s) junto(s) “We’re together” / “I’m with you” / “I’m here for you” Difícil mesmo, mas tmj!
“It’s really complicated, but I’m here for you.”
blz beleza “Cool” / “Deal” Vamos outro dia, blz?
“Let’s go on another day, cool?”
flw falou “Bye” / “Ok” Até mais, flw!
“See you, bye!”

Vou dormir agora, flw?
“I’m going to sleep now, ok?”

vlw valeu “Thanks” / “Owe you one” Vlw, miga!
“Thanks, friend!”
sla sei lá “I don’t know” Ah, sla!
“Ah, I don’t know.”
brinks brincadeira “Kidding” / “Just kidding” É brinks
“Just kidding.”
tranks tranquilo “All good” / “No problem” – Obrigada!
“Thanks!”

– Tranks
“No problem.”

miga / migo amiga / amigo “Friend” Miga, sdds!
“Friend, miss you!”
kra cara “Dude” Cara, vc ñ sabe o q aconteceu!
“Dude, you don’t know what happened.”
bb bebê “Baby” Td bem, bb?
“How are you, baby?”
kbça cabeça “Head” This is an ironic name for someone, implying they aren’t very smart or that they did something silly.
mec “Cool” / “All good” Tô mec, e você?
“I’m good, and you?”
fds / findi fim de semana “Weekend” Vai fazer o q esse findi?
“What are you doing this weekend?”
fds f*da-se “F*ck it” This is a swear word that expresses annoyance or exasperation. Watch the context to differentiate it from the previous use of fds.
pqp p*** que pariu “Holy s***” This is a swear word that expresses surprise or frustration.
fdp filho/filha da p*** “Son of a b****” This is a swear word used against other people.
kct c*cete Works like a “WTF” Kct, sério?
“WTF, really?”
aff This can express both shock or boredom (like a sigh).
putz This is another interjection that can express shock or surprise.

/! Note /!

You might have noticed that the different conjugations of the verb estar can appear in two ways: the original version and a shortened version.

está → tá
estou → tô
estamos → tamos

These aren’t slang words per se, and they’re very common in both spoken Portuguese and in text messages or social media.

2. Laughing the Brazilian Way

Computer Words

A guide to Brazilian Portuguese internet slang could never be complete without an in-depth look at how Brazilians laugh online. With the vast numbers of Brazilians on the internet, the particular way in which they laugh has caused plenty of confusion online. Let’s unpack the top ways in which Brazilians laugh online and get you laughing along!

  • kkk

The award for most confusing laughter has to go to kkk—and all of its variations with an increasing number of k’s, depending on how much fun you’re having! And no, don’t worry, this is not a racist salute in any way.

For some reason, in Brazil, the idea of laughing with a “qua-qua-qua” sound is an old one, as you can hear in this song of the iconic Brazilian singer Elis Regina.

  • rsrs

This is an abbreviation of the word risos (“laughter”).

  • huahuahuahua

This is another common way of laughing, derived from the traditional “hahaha.”

  • hdashdjkasdjshdsdjasd

Randomly pressing letters on the keyboard is also common!

  • Other honorable mentions

huehuehue, hauhauhauhau, spoaskoaksak, kjkjkjkjkjkjkj, haushhaushshsuah

Can you tell Brazilians are happy people? A simple “LOL” is not enough to express all the dimensions of fun!

Man and Woman Laughing at a Party

3. Portuguese Internet Slang Derived from English

Many commonly used internet slang words in Portuguese actually originate from English words! And we’re not talking about the abbreviations that come straight from the English language and are used in the same context, like BFF, OMG, or plz. After all, in Brazil, things go a step further!

Most of the cases below are used as verbs, adding a Portuguese ending to an English word. This kind of expression is quite common, and there’s always a new one being added to the Brazilian internet vocabulary! Let’s take a look at the most popular ones.

Expression Translation Example/Explanation
stalkear “To stalk” Eu stalkeei ela no Instagram
“I stalked her on Instagram.”
crushear “To have a crush” Tá crusheando, né?
“You have a crush, don’t you?”
trollar “To troll” O pessoal não cansa de trollar na internet
People don’t get tired of trolling online.”
shippar “To ship” Eu shippo muito esse casal
“I ship this couple very much.”
flopar “To fail” / “To be unsuccessful” O novo album dessa banda flopou
“This band’s new album was a fail.”
hypado “Hyped” Esse restaurante tá muito hypado
“This restaurant is too hyped.”
zapzap “Whatsapp” Originally, this is what older people called Whatsapp.
Face “Facebook” Me add no Face!
“Add me on Facebook.”
Insta “Instagram” Posta no Insta
“Post it on Instagram.”

Old man shrugging in confusion

Sometimes the Expressions Make No Literal Sense!

4. Internet Slangs Popular on Social Media

You may not know, but Brazil is a fertile land for memes! As a result, many Portuguese expressions are born online and can even reach the streets being used in real life. Here are some popular internet-born slang words and expressions that you might hear from locals in an informal conversation.

Expression Literal translation Explanation Example
dar biscoito / querer biscoito “To give a cookie” / “To want a cookie” This is used when someone is seeking attention or compliments. Olha quantas fotos ele postou, ele quer biscoito.
“Look how many pictures he posted, he wants attention.”
tá na Disney “He/she is in Disney” This phrase expresses that someone is saying something out of reality, as if they were in a cartoon or movie. Você quer comprar esse carro? Tá na Disney?
“You want to buy this car? Are you crazy?”
Deus me livre mas quem me dera “God forbid, but I wish” This is a paradoxical expression that refers to those situations where you want something but rationally you know you shouldn’t. There is a song with this name! Todo mundo está namorando. Deus me livre, mas quem me dera.
“Everyone is dating now. I don’t want it but also, I do.”
fada sensata “Wise fairy” This is used as a compliment, mostly for women, based on their wise actions or comments. Ela pediu demissão. Fada sensata.
“She quit her job, smart woman.”
dar PT “To have a total loss” PT is short for Perda Total (“total loss”). This expression is used when someone gets very drunk. Dei PT na festa de ontem
“I was blackout drunk at the party yesterday.”
10/10 “10 out of 10” This one is a compliment on someone’s appearance. Scarlett Johansson é muito 10/10
“Scarlett Johansson is gorgeous.”
mitar “To be a myth” This is used when someone does something amazing. Ele mitou muito na apresentação
“He was amazing at the presentation.”
Meldels “My God” This is another way of expressing surprise, just like OMG, but in a funnier way. Meldels, é verdade isso?
“OMG, is it true?”
menine “Boy or girl” This is a unissex way of referring to somebody. Menine, você não vai acreditar!
“Hey you, you won’t believe this!”
berro “Scream” This expresses a strong reaction to something surprising or very funny. – Você viu o vídeo da festa?

– Berro!

– “Have you seen the video of the party?”

– “OMG!”

socorro / scrro / scrr “Help” This is used when reacting to something very funny. – Olha esse meme!

– Scrr! Hahahaha

– “Look at this meme.”

– “LOL!”

→ Continue learning what’s popular in Brazil with the Top 5 Culture Icons You Need to Know About, on PortuguesePod101!

5. Popular Emojis in Brazil

Computer Sentences

Wondering what the most popular emojis are in Brazil? Since they’re such an important part of texting, it’s good to know what’s commonly used when talking to locals!

  1. Red heart ❤️
  2. Heart eyes 😍
  3. Clapping hands 👏
  4. Cat with heart eyes 😻
  5. Please / Thank you 🙏
  6. Music 🎶
  7. Smiling moon, which can imply flirting 🌚
  8. Peace sign ✌️
  9. Eyes 👀

Woman chatting on her phone

Now You’re Ready to Text Like a Brazilian!

6. Learn More Portuguese with PortuguesePod101

Feeling ready to confidently text in Brazilian Portuguese? Feel free to come back to this article whenever you need to brush up on your Portuguese internet slang. New expressions and abbreviations might pop up from time to time, so the best way to keep up-to-date is engaging with Portuguese speakers online!

Do you think we forgot any important slang words or phrases? Did the examples help you understand when to use each expression? Let us know in the comments below!

Now it’s time to continue on your language-learning journey! There are more free Portuguese resources and a variety of vocabulary lists available on PortuguesePod101. Go ahead and choose your favorite tools to expand your learning opportunities.

If you want to take your learning experience further, members of PortuguesePod101.com get access to the largest language lesson library in the world, with thousands of real lessons by real teachers. Perfect for anyone who wants to learn from anywhere, feel motivated, and be ready to speak Portuguese with confidence.

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How to Celebrate Father’s Day in Brazil

Fathers are extremely important people, benefiting both their own children and society as a whole when they choose to act in this honorable role. On Fathers Day, Brazilians seek to honor and show appreciation for the fathers or father-figures in their lives, as much of the world does once a year.

In this article, we’ll go over the basics of how Brazil celebrates Father’s Day, including the most popular gifts and traditions. At PortuguesePod101.com, we hope to make this learning journey worthwhile, and hope you take away something valuable!

Happy Fathers Day!

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1. What is Father’s Day?

You’re likely familiar with the concept of Father’s Day, as it’s celebrated in just about every country. Father’s Day is a holiday for children and whole families to celebrate and honor fathers, usually through Father’s Day gifts.

This may be the only day of the year that many fathers are acknowledged and truly shown appreciation for their role in the family, and in society, making this holiday an important aspect of Brazilian culture. Even the best dads need a little motivation sometimes!

2. When is Fathers Day in Brazil?

Father's Day on Sunday

The Fathers Day date in Brazil is the second Sunday in August each year.

The date was set by the well-known journalist Roberto Marinho, who wanted to boost his business and consequently his newspaper sales. They say the date was chosen by his advertising consultant, Sylvio Bhering, because August 14 was the feast day of St. Joachim, the patron saint of his family. Roberto Marinho’s plan worked, and the date has since proved very “profitable” (rentável) for stores.

For your convenience, we’ve put together a list of this holiday’s date for the next ten years.

  • 2019: August 11
  • 2020: August 9
  • 2021: August 8
  • 2022: August 14
  • 2023: August 13
  • 2024: August 11
  • 2025: August 10
  • 2026: August 9
  • 2027: August 8
  • 2028: August 13

3. Reading Practice: Fathers Day Celebrations in Brazil

Father Receiving Gift from Daughter

Do you know how Brazilians celebrate Father’s Day, and what gifts are most common? Read the Portuguese text below to find out, and find the English translation directly below it.

Nesse dia, a maioria dos filhos compra um presente para o seu pai, escrevem cartas ou cartões de agradecimento e planejam um dia diferente e especial. A maioria dos filhos procuram um presente do gosto do pai. Entre os presentes mais comuns estão roupas ou perfumes.

Nas escolas, as crianças normalmente preparam um presente na sexta-feira e levam para casa para presentear seus papais. Algumas escolas também organizam recitais e apresentações especialmente para os papais.

E, no domingo, prepara-se um almoço especial, e se aproveita o dia entre a família para passear ou fazer o que o pai quiser. Afinal, esse dia todos querem agradar o seu pai!

É muito comum no Brasil filhos com o sobrenome “Junior,” “Filho” e netos que se chamam “Neto,” para honrar o nome do seus progenitores, como João da Silva Filho ou Pedro Soares Oliveira Junior ou José da Costa Machado Neto.

On this day, most children buy a gift for their father, write letters or cards of thanks, and plan to spend the day in a unique and special way. Most children hunt for a present their father will like. Among the most common choices of gifts are clothes or men’s cologne.

In school, the kids usually prepare a gift on the preceding Friday and take it home to give to their dad. Some schools also put on special concerts and shows for the fathers.

Then, on Sunday, a special lunch is prepared, and the father can take advantage of the day with his family for an outing or whatever other activity he chooses. After all, on that day everyone wants to please dad.

It is very common in Brazil for sons to have “Junior” or “Son” (or grandsons) to have “Grandson” added to their names as a mark of respect for their father’s name. For example, João da Silva Filho with Filho meaning “the son,” or Pedro Soares Oliveira Junior or José da Costa Machado Neto with Neto meaning “the grandson.”

4. Three Generations

Do you know any sayings that mention the three generations—father, son, and grandson?

“Dad is rich, son is noble, grandson is poor.” This saying relates to the difficulty of maintaining inheritance, wealth, and success through many generations.

5. Vocabulary You Should Know for Father’s Day in Brazil

Coffee, Donut, and Card

Here’s some vocabulary you need to know for Father’s Day in Brazil!

  • Domingo — “Sunday”
  • Pai — “Father”
  • Filho — “Son”
  • Filha — “Daughter”
  • Presente — “Present”
  • Jantar — “Dinner”
  • Amar — “Love”
  • Dia dos Pais — “Father’s Day”
  • Celebrar — “Celebrate”
  • Vale-presente — “Gift certificate”
  • Cartão de dia dos pais — “Father’s Day greeting card”

To hear the pronunciation of each Portuguese Father’s Day vocabulary word, check out our relevant vocabulary list!

Conclusion

We hope you enjoyed learning about Father’s Day in Brazil with us! How do you celebrate Father’s Day? Let us know in the comments!

To continue learning about the Portuguese language and Brazilian culture, visit us at PortuguesePod101.com, and explore our variety of practical learning tools. Read more insightful blog posts like this one, study free Portuguese vocabulary lists, and download our mobile apps designed to help you learn Portuguese no matter where you are! By upgrading to Premium Plus, you can also take advantage of our MyTeacher program and learn Portuguese with a more one-on-one approach and personalized plan.

Whatever your reasons for being drawn to the Portuguese language, know that with enough hard work and determination, you can master the language! And PortuguesePod101 will be here with you to help.

Feliz dia dos pais! (This means “Happy Father’s Day!” in Brazilian Portuguese.)

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12 Essential Untranslatable Portuguese Words

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Not everything can be translated. The Biblical story of the Tower of Babel tells of a time when all humans stopped speaking the same language to drown in the confusion of different idioms. The conflicts have spread throughout humankind, which has been dissolved into different tribes.

Indeed, communication is full of perils. Speech is the root of every possible human bond and results in building or destroying bridges. Normally, when a message fails to be transmitted, the consequences aren’t good.

This effort to translate is hard enough in daily matters. But what about the untranslatable Portuguese words and those of other languages?

The benefits of learning untranslatable Portuguese words may not be obvious at first sight, but they exist. For one, it’s a good way to learn more about the culture of the target country and to understand more about the native speakers’ mindset.

That’s why you’re about to grow as a student with the help of a brand-new list of untranslatable Portuguese words from PortuguesePod101!

Disclaimer

The following words will be presented with a literal translation, which could also be properly called an approximate meaning. Because these are Portuguese words with no English equivalent, right? But we’ll do our best to communicate the actual meaning after the literal translation to make it as precise as possible.

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Table of Contents

  1. Saudade
  2. Fado
  3. Gostosa
  4. Tapioca
  5. Oca
  6. Xodó
  7. Desbundar
  8. Cafuné
  9. Ouvido e orelha
  10. Anteontem
  11. Cadê
  12. Caprichar
  13. How PortuguesePod101 Can Help You Learn More Untranslatable Words in Portuguese

1. Saudade

Best Ways to Learn

Literal Translation:

There isn’t one.

Meaning:

Feelings of nostalgia and longing for something, someone, or some situation. Normally, these are melancholy feelings, but can also carry joyful undertones.

Example Situations:

To long for a dead relative; missing a childhood object; to miss an ex-partner (or the feelings you felt toward them); to yearn to go back in time to a situation.

Usage in a Sentence:

  • Sinto saudade dela.
    “I miss her.”
  • Que saudades da casa da minha infância…
    “Oh, how I long for the house of my childhood…”

When it comes to words often used together with this term, people usually “have” saudade or “feel” saudade.

The feeling can also be expressed as a lament with the help of que: Que saudade da casa da minha infância…

Additional Notes:

Some people see this as one of the most beautiful untranslatable Portuguese words. The word is largely employed in lyrical context, which is probably the best context to learn the many ways it can be used.

Saudade ranges from modern Brazilian music from the end of the 1950s (João Gilberto’s Chega de Saudade album) back to the poems of Luís Vaz de Camões (Nascerão Saudades Do Meu Bem, for instance) in the 17th century. These were some of the most important contributions in shaping the pillars of the popular Portuguese idiom that we know today.

Actually, saudade has been present in Portuguese poetry since it began. The medieval cantigas de amigo (“friend songs,” or romantic chivalry lyrics) already used the word to describe the feeling of maidens left behind by their knights to die in battles.

So, if you search well enough, you may draw the conclusion that this is not only a very old and beautiful word, but also one of the most popular untranslatable words in Portuguese.

2. Fado

José Malhoa’s painting “Fado” (1910) depicts a working class Portuguese couple in a moment of artistic contemplation.

Literal Translation:

“Fate”

Meaning:

Besides being a less popular translation for “fate,” fado is the name of a popular melancholic Portuguese music genre.

Example Situation:

The most common use of fado is in fado lyrics, such as Tudo isto é fado by poet Aníbal Nazaré, and it was made famous by the voice of Portuguese singer Amália Rodrigues:

Almas vencidas/Noites perdidas/Sombras bizarras(…)/Amor ciúme/Cinzas e lume/Dor e pecado/Tudo isto existe/Tudo isto é triste/Tudo isto é fado(… )

“Beaten souls/Lost nights/Bizarre shadows(…)/Love jealousy/Cinders and lights/Pain and sin/All this exists/All this is sad/All this is fado(…)”

Usage in a Sentence:

Fado can be used with and without musical context, though the latter is much less common.
When the word is used in lyrics, it can depict both the song genre and fate, depending on the situation.

Additional Notes:

Exposure to fado singers’ and instrumentalists’ works will not only lead you to find popular poetry and more interesting untranslatable Portuguese idioms. It will also present to you the unique universe of Moorish and European musical expression and instruments, blended into Portugal’s modern musical pride.

Also, you’ll certainly find some of the most beautiful Portuguese words and phrases we need in English.

3. Gostosa

Literal Translation:

“Tasty”

Meaning:

To use gostosa is similar to using “hot” to describe an attractive woman. It can also be used for men, adapted to gostoso.

Example Situation:

Gostosa is an adjective and one of the funny untranslatable Portuguese words on this list. But as you may have imagined, to call someone “tasty” can be perceived as very vulgar by the person receiving the compliment.

An example situation for the appropriate use of this word would be in a context of informality and intimacy. It’s sexy talk. For instance, if used during flirting, gostosa normally would not be employed to establish first impressions—don’t be a jerk.

Usage in a Sentence:

  • Já te disseram que você é bem gostosa?
    “Did someone ever tell you that you’re very hot?”

4. Tapioca

Bubble Tea with Tapioca Balls

Literal Translation:

There isn’t one.

Meaning:

It’s a type of edible flour made of manioc, but the word is normally used to describe a fine pancake recipe prepared with this flour and various types of fillings.

Example Situation:

Tapioca is a noun, which means it can be qualified by adjectives. The most common ones for an interested gourmand would be doce or salgado (“sweet” or “salted”), since these are the flavors offered when ordering one.

Despite the choice of fillings, there aren’t many ways to prepare tapioca: mostly, it’s fried (frita) in a pan without oil. But you might find other ways to serve it, since it’s growingly incorporated into other plates and candies. For instance: dadinho de tapioca (“little tapioca dice” ) or sorvete de tapioca (“tapioca ice cream”).

Usage in a Sentence:

  • Esta tapioca com manteiga está deliciosa, mas prefiro com recheio doce.
    “This buttered tapioca is delicious, but I’d rather eat one with a sweet filling.”

Additional Notes:

This isn’t one of the hard Portuguese words to learn or use. Indeed, rather than learning this example of untranslatable Brazilian Portuguese words, you’re probably better off tasting a sample of tapioca! To savor it is also untranslatable…

This Brazilian delicacy is a native dish and very popular in the Northern and Northeastern regions of the country. In the time of colonization, it was fed to the slaves and also served as food for settlers. Presently, it’s a “trendy” option for snacks and sandwiches among gym enthusiasts, since it can be prepared as a very thin yet consistent and energetic pancake, and filled with “healthy” ingredients.

5. Oca

A Photo of the Oca Building by Niemeyer

Niemeyer’s Oca building is inspired by primordial native constructions

Literal Translation:

There isn’t one.

Meaning:

An indigenous dwelling made out of wood and vegetable fibers—typically found in Brazil.

Don’t confuse this word with the Portuguese translation for “hollow,” which is pronounced “oh-kah.” The word in question here should be pronounced with an “open o” (like in the word “rock”).

Example Situation:

Consisting of three letters, this is probably one of the least hard Portuguese words to learn from this list. It’s normally employed in native contexts.

Usage in a Sentence:

The word is typically used to describe indigenous houses, and not in connotative manners. A group of ocas can be called an aldeia.

Additional Notes:

The format of an oca is rounded and it can vary in size. To imagine one, you just need to picture a coconut sunken halfway into the ground.

The form of the oca has served as inspiration for modern architectural structures in Brazil. The most famous one is Oscar Niemeyer’s Oca in the Ibirapuera Park, in São Paulo. It’s a museum for small- to medium-sized expositions.

6. Xodó

Literal Translation:

There isn’t one.

Meaning:

The dearest one; the loved one

Example Situation:

Xodó can be used to refer to different types of people for whom the speaker feels tenderness. Relatives, especially children, can be xodós. For example, a grandson can be a grandmother’s xodó, and vice-versa. Pets, dear objects, and hobbies can be xodós as well.

Finally, this word can also be applied in a dating context as a synonym for a valentine or a dear one.

Usage in a Sentence:

Xodó is a popular example of untranslatable words in Portuguese vocabulary. It should be used in informal register.

An example of the expression’s usage in a dating context is Dominguinhos’ song Xodó, also interpreted by Luiz Gonzaga. This forró singer is among Brazil’s most famous musicians of all time. The chorus of the tune is as follows:

  • Eu só quero um amor/Que acabe o meu sofrer/Um xodó pra mim/Do meu jeito assim/Que alegre o meu viver
    “All I want is a valentine/That will end my suffering/A valentine for me/Just the way I like it/That will lighten up my living”

The term can also refer to the relationship itself, not the valentine.

Other examples outside of the dating context are:

  • Ele tem um xodó tremendo pelo carro.
    “He is tremendously in love with his car.”
    (Note that the “relationship” meaning is employed in this case, but in a connotative manner.)
  • A garotinha era o xodó do professor de História.
    “The little girl was the dearest of the history teacher.”

7. Desbundar

People Drinking at a Party

Literal Translation:

There isn’t one.

Meaning:

This is one of the most complex untranslatable Portuguese words on this list. Essentially, this verb is equivalent to “dazzle”…but not only that. It also carries behavioral tones that are not encompassed by “dazzle.” For example, desbundar can refer to losing control, becoming inebriated, or taking to deviant sexual behavior.

Finally, to free yourself from social constraints in general can be described as desbundar (the verb) or desbunde (the noun, which is the liberating act itself).

Example Situation:

Someone at a party after their fourth glass of caipirinha is ready to desbundar—if they haven’t already.

Usage in a Sentence:

  • Beatriz desbundou de vez após consumir tanta droga.
    “Beatriz has lost track completely after consuming so many drugs.”
  • O turista desbundou quando viu o Rio Amazonas.
    “The tourist was bedazzled by the sight of the Amazonas River.”

Additional Notes:

Desbundar and desbunde are more examples of why untranslatable Portuguese terms are somewhat hard for foreigners to understand fully, even after they learn the general idea. Foreign speakers lack certain cultural information, which is sometimes hard to get.

We’ve already commented on musical and literary repertoire related to other words. In this case, desbunde (in the sense of liberation or losing track of reality) was popularized in the context of the Brazilian dictatorship of the 1960s. That was when desbunde got this sense among artists who were experimenting with cultural norms, sexual liberation, and aesthetic modernization.

8. Cafuné

Literal Translation:

There isn’t one.

Meaning:

Running your fingers through one’s hair

Example Situation:

Though it may seem like a romantic gesture, a cafuné is a normal form of affection in Brazil among friends and relatives. Though it can certainly be used in a romantic context as well.

Usage in a Sentence:

  • Vem cá me fazer um cafuné.
    “Come here and give me a cuddle.”

9. Ouvido e orelha

A Man Listening to Something

Literal Translation:

“Ear” and…”ear”

Meaning:

This may come across as something odd.

Ouvido stands for the inner part of the ear (the ducts inside the tiny hole of the ear), whereas orelha is the outer part of the ear—its “structure.”

Example Situation:

Typically, when it comes to hearing something or having pain in the ear, the speaker will refer to the ouvido.

When talking about the physical structure of the ear, the part seen by the eyes, the speaker will talk about orelha.

Usage in a Sentence:

  • Vou ao médico, pois estou com dor de ouvido.
    “I’m going to the physician because I feel pain in my ear.”
  • Levei uma bolada na orelha e agora ela está vermelha como um pimentão.
    “They’ve kicked the ball against my ear and now it is red as a pepper.”

Additional Notes:

Someone with large ears is often called orelhas de abano (“fan ears”).

Someone with good hearing skills is considered to have ouvidos de tísico or ouvidos de tuberculoso (both synonyms for “tuberculous ears”).

10. Anteontem

Literal Translation:

“Before yesterday”

Meaning:

It is the day before yesterday.

Example Situation:

Actually, an English speaker can find an equivalent for this word in “ereyesterday.” But since this form is extremely archaic, we consider anteontem to be one of the important untranslatable Portuguese words for new learners.

Anteontem is freely and often used in Portuguese conversations not only in Brazil, but also in Portugal, Angola, Mozambique, and Guiné-Bissau.

Usage in a Sentence:

  • Você deveria ter feito a reserva anteontem…
    “You should have done the reservations the day before yesterday…”
  • Ela assistiu um filme terrível anteontem.
    “She watched a terrible movie the day before yesterday.”
  • Aonde todos foram anteontem?
    “Where did everybody go the day before yesterday?”

Other commonly used verbs that go with anteontem are: comer (“to eat”), tocar (“to play”), jogar (“to play”), and the list goes on.

Additional Notes:

Fun fact: This word is an example of linguistic bricolage in Portuguese. It’s the exact combination of antes (“before” ) and ontem (“yesterday”).

11. Cadê

Literal Translation:

“Where is”

Meaning:

This is a subtle example of Brazillian Portuguese words you can’t translate into English. You most certainly can ask where something is in English. But can you do it in one word? Cadê, also known as quede or quedê, is the contraction of “where is” (onde está) in one word—even though onde está doesn’t sound anything close to cadê.

Example Situation:

If you’ve lost something or want to know where someone is, cadê is the word of choice.

Fun fact: In the late 1990s, Cadê was the name of a Brazilian web search engine, similar to Google.

Usage in a Sentence:

  • Cadê o chinelo?
    “Where is the flip flop [sandal]?”
  • Cadê Tereza?
    “Where is Tereza?”

Additional Notes:

Actually, quede is the contraction of que é de…? which is an archaic way of asking for something’s whereabouts. Curiously enough, que é de is the exact equivalent to “what became of…?”

Cadê or quedê are preferable to quede, which can also refer to a sports shoe or a golf caddie. Or you can engage in truly untranslatable Portuguese phrases asking where the caddie is: quede o quede?

12. Caprichar

Hot Dog with Mustard

Literal Translation:

“To make it in a whimsical way”

Meaning:

To put effort into something; to execute something well

Example Situation:

This is yet another interesting case of Portuguese words with no English translation. The literal translation of capricho (the noun) would be “whim.” In Portuguese, capricho can also mean “whim,” actually.

But for some reason, the verb caprichar is different. When someone capricha in something, they’re doing it well or at least putting effort into it.

Usage in a Sentence:

  • Este relatório será apresentado ao chefe, então por favor capriche!
    “This report will be presented to the boss, so please make it as good as you can!”
  • Tem como fazer este cachorro-quente bem caprichado?
    “Can you make this hot dog a big and fat one?”

Note that the term has been employed in a connotative manner. A caprichado hot dog would be a big and fat one in the eyes of the speaker. This is what’s expected from the snack for it to be the best possible.

Additional Notes:

As you may have noticed, other forms of words can derive from caprichar. The noun capricho is one of them, and the adjective caprichado is another very common example. Either way, all of these words are often employed in colloquial register rather than formal.

13. How PortuguesePod101 Can Help You Learn More Untranslatable Words in Portuguese

Reasons for Studying

A friendly push can lead a beginner or intermediate speaker to a truly clear path of knowledge. In fact, learning a language alone is usually harder than connecting to other people, teachers, and cultures in the process.

PortuguesePod101 is a database that gathers free resources for Portuguese speakers at every level. Our sections and lessons are organized to guarantee a balanced approach to the content. Untranslatable terms in Portuguese will be easier to learn when you combine formal “classroom” teaching and informal, relaxed articles, podcasts, videos, and other learning tools.

Indeed, the MyTeacher feature is one to behold. This fast-track to fluency will give you guidance, one-on-one contact, and personalized feedback to help you improve your Portuguese skills. You’ll get to learn Portuguese terms we wish existed in English, and many other important cultural traits that are hard to get elsewhere without going abroad.

Get access to a whole new world of knowledge with PortuguesePod101. We’ll give you the tools—you finish the job!

Before you go, let us know in the comments if any of these words were new to you. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Self-Introduction Guide: “My Name is,” in Portuguese and More

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When getting to know a different country and culture, why not start by learning the local language, a guaranteed way to let locals know you’re interested in being part of their world and culture?

Learning some quick tips and basic conversational rules can be a great shortcut to making new friends, ensuring a variety of experiences during your visit, and even arranging business opportunities. With Brazilians, trying to speak Portuguese is a sign of great respect and should earn you quick empathy amongst locals.

First things first, learn how to introduce yourself in Portuguese. A simple “my name is…” in Portuguese can represent the difference between a long-lasting, successful relationship with locals, and just passing by unnoticed. If you ever googled “How to say my name in Brazilian Portuguese,” this guide is tailor-made for you. 😉

Regarding Portuguese, one of the most-spoken languages, you don’t have to worry about advanced studies of language in a college (or anything like that) to achieve those goals we mentioned. Let’s start with the basic “Hello, my name is,” in Portuguese and work our way up from there. You’ll be able to introduce yourself in Brazilian Portuguese in no time!

Table of Contents

  1. Identifying Yourself
  2. Placing Yourself in Society
  3. Sharing Personal Details
  4. How PortuguesePod101 Can Help You Learn More Portuguese

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1. Identifying Yourself

Don’t be just another passing-by gringo. Brazilians tend to be very open people (way more than the average North-American or European), and a way to show that you’re interested in bonding with them and their culture is learning basic introductions.

Letting your conversation partner know your name is the foundation stone in any dialogue, and in any language, so we should begin there. Keep in mind that you can use many forms to greet someone. It’s up to you to choose!

1- “My Name is,” in Portuguese

First Encounter

  • “My name is John Doe/Jane Doe.”
    O meu nome é John Doe/Jane Doe.

Though both languages use the Latin alphabet, Portuguese has different speaking nuances than English. Vowels in Portuguese usually have the same sound in any word, except when marked with accents.

In the sentence above, for example, the letter é, with the accent, is pronounced like the “e” in the English word “bet.” This is the “to be” verb, so it’s essential for a new speaker to learn how to say it properly. Without the accent, e means “and,” and is pronounced like the “e” in “ember.” Always mind your pronunciation.

The approximate sound of “My name is…” in Portuguese, then, should be something like Oo mayu noh-me eh John Doe/Jane Doe.

There are several other forms you can use to answer the “how to say my name in Brazilian Portuguese” question. Here are a few other options:

  • “I am called John Doe/Jane Doe.”
    Eu me chamo John Doe/Jane Doe.
    Eoo me sha-moo John Doe/Jane Doe.
  • “I am John Doe/Jane Doe. ”
    Eu sou o John Doe/a Jane Doe. [Mind the gender article.]
    Eoo sow ô John Doe/ah Jane Doe. [This ô has a closed pronunciation, like the “o” in “row” for instance).

2- Where Are You From?

Swedish Countries

After introducing your name, the next step in how to introduce yourself in Brazilian Portuguese is to talk a little about where you come from. Brazilians are always fascinated to know people from abroad, and the more details you feel comfortable giving, the more the average Brazilian is likely to bond with you (and in less time).

Keep in mind, though, that not everyone in Brazil is very good with foreign geography, so when trying to introduce yourself in Portuguese and telling them where you come from, be specific and detailed. For example, if you come from Brooklyn, be sure to add that it’s not only a part of New York City, but also a part of the United States.

That said, let’s see some examples of introducing yourself in Portuguese regarding birthplace.

  • “I come from Brooklyn, New York City, USA.”
    Eu venho do Brooklyn, Nova Iorque, Estados Unidos.

The pronunciation should be something similar to: Eoo ven-niow do Brooklyn, Novah York, Es-tah-dows Oo-nee-dows.
It’s also possible to use a variation that wouldn’t be correct in English, but works just fine in Brazilian Portuguese:

    “I am from Brooklyn, New York City, USA.”
    Eu sou do Brooklyn, Nova Iorque, Estados Unidos.

The pronunciation should be something like: Eoo sow do Brooklyn, Novah York, Es-tah-dows Oo-nee-dows. [Remember to keep those Os with a closed sound!]

2. Placing Yourself in Society

About Yourself

Learning how to say “Hello, my name is,” in Portuguese is just the first step in becoming more than just another tourist in Brazil. If you’re really interested in bonding and blending in, don’t be afraid to try and go even further! Okay, you’ve already said where you come from, but how about your line of work?

1- Talking About Your Profession in Portuguese

Like in the Western world, talking about professions is as natural as it gets. Of course, it’s impossible to generalize, but overall this is a very good way to keep a dialogue from going toward that uncomfortable silence we all hate.

A good way to begin is just speaking about your profession. Remember to keep it simple, so perhaps an “I am a/an [profession],” is the best way to go. Let’s see how it looks in Portuguese, then:

  • “I am a journalist.”
    Eu sou jornalista.
    Eoo sow johr-nah-lees-tah.

Journalist at Work with Typewriter

After that, feel safe to talk about where you currently work, or perhaps some of your professional history—that will definitely show your conversation partner you’re interested not only in learning about their country and culture, but also in sharing some of your own personal life story. That said, let’s see how to say it properly in Portuguese:

  • “I work at the New York Times.”
    Eu trabalho no New York Times.
    Eoo tra-bah-liow noo New York Times.

If you want to be a little more specific, don’t hesitate to try:

  • “I take photos for the New York Times.”
    Eu tiro fotos para o New York Times.
    Eoo tee-ro phoh-tows pah-rah oo New York Times.
  • “I write for the New York Times.”
    Eu escrevo para o New York Times.
    Eoo scre-vow pah-rah oo New York Times.

2- Talking About Your Education

As a bonus, you can go as far as telling Brazilians where you studied. If you don’t feel so confident, rest assured that a lot of American culture has made its way to Brazil over the years, and there’s a huge chance that anyone you’re talking with shows great interest in hearing about your college (and even high school) experiences.

Quick tip: “High school” in Brazilian Portuguese is called Ensino Médio, which literally translates to “middle school.” “College” is called Ensino Superior, which translates to “Upper School” or “Superior School,” so don’t get confused! It’s safer, though, to refer to “college” as faculdade or universidade. Ensino Superior is way too formal.

You can also talk about what you studied. This is very common in Brazil, and the structure is similar to talking about where you studied.

  • “I studied at Midwood High School.”
    Eu estudei na escola Midwood High School no Ensino Médio.
    Eoo ess-too-day na ess-koh-lah Midwood High School noo En-see-now Meh-dee-ow.
  • “I went to Harvard for college/university.”
    Eu estudei em Harvard na faculdade. OR Eu fiz faculdade em Harvard.
    Eoo ess-too-day em Harvard nah fah-cool-dah-de. OR Eoo fiss fah-cool-dah-de em Harvard.
  • “I studied Journalism at Columbia.”
    Eu estudei jornalismo em Columbia. OR Eu fiz jornalismo em Columbia.
    Eoo ess-too-day johr-nah-lees-mow em Columbia. OR Eoo fiss johr-nah-lees-mow em Columbia.

3. Sharing Personal Details

Introducing Yourself

Okay, now you’ve said “My name is,” in Portuguese and also learned to talk a little about your profession and education. The next level is sharing personal details. Of course, whether or not to share lots of details is completely up to you. But here are some nice tips for doing so as you introduce yourself in Brazilian Portuguese.

1- Talking About Your Age

Question Mark Birthday Cake

They now know your name, your line of work, and even your high school and university names, but when were you born? Mind that Portuguese is a little different from English here. In English, you would say “I am 29 years old,” just the way you say “I am John Doe,” right? In Brazilian Portuguese, it doesn’t work that way. The verb used in that language is the “have” verb. Therefore, when answering “How old are you?” your sentence should be:

  • “I have 29 years.”
    Eu tenho 29 anos.
    Eoo ten-nio vin-tchy e noh-vee ah-noss.

It’s also possible to say just the numeral, like in English: “twenty-nine” = vinte e nove = vin-tchy e noh-vee.

Another possibility is sharing the year you were born. That should look like this:

  • “I was born in 1990.”
    Eu nasci em 1990.
    Eoo nah-see em mew-noveh-sentows-e-noven-tah.

2- Talking About Where You Live

Now they know your age and your origins. Perhaps it’s time to talk about where you currently live.

  • “I live in Boston now.”
    Eu moro em Boston agora. OR Eu vivo em Boston agora.
    Eoo vee-vow em Boston ah-goh-rah. OR Eoo moh-row em Boston ah-goh-rah.

The “final weapon” you can use that will work with virtually any Brazilian is—guess? Soccer.

Even if you encounter someone who’s not exactly a soccer fan (something rare, yes), the fact that you feel comfortable talking about what’s probably the biggest national pride will surely show beyond any question that you are interested in bonding.

The first rule regarding language in this case is the word “soccer” itself, that doesn’t exist in Portuguese. The official name in Brazil is futebol and, as it’s easy to see, sounds almost exactly like “football.” That said, always remember that futebol is “soccer,” and futebol americano is what you probably know as “football” (which is referred to as “American Football” in Brazil). Not easy, right?

  • “Which soccer team do you root for?”
    Para qual time de futebol você torce?
    Pah-rah cual tee-me de foo-te-ball vow-se tohr-se?

3- Talking About Your Family

If you feel comfortable enough, tell your conversation partner about your family as well. This will surely help you bond easier. You don’t have to give full names or anything like that; just give their first name, their profession, and maybe where they live (if not with you, of course). Details like this are harmless and should keep any friendly conversation going smoothly.

  • “My dad is called Frank, he is a lawyer and lives in Chicago.”
    Meu pai se chama Frank, ele é advogado e mora em Chicago.
    Meoo pah-ee se shah-mah Frank, eh-leh eah ad-vow-gah-dow eh moh-rah em Chicago.

4- Talking About Your Hobbies

Another subject always pleasant to discuss is that of hobbies. Everyone’s got hobbies, and it might surprise you how easy it is to find a special connection with someone who shares the same interests as you, regardless of nationality. Don’t be shy to ask them, and also to share yours! There are no rules, and you can talk about playing a musical instrument, collecting stamps, visiting beaches, building scale models of airplanes, writing poems, and so on. Just give it a shot!

  • “I play the bass in a band.”
    Eu toco baixo numa banda.
    Eoo toh-co bye-shoo noo-mah ban-dah.

How PortuguesePod101 Can Help You Learn More Portuguese

If you’re planning to visit Brazil, but don’t feel confident enough about speaking with locals, don’t hesitate to try to learn as much as you can before boarding the plane. Remember that, apart from the biggest urban centres in São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Brasília, and a few others, the average Brazilian speaks little to no English.

PortuguesePod101 is an ideal way of getting to know Portuguese as it matters: in situations that might actually happen. What’s the point of learning from long and senseless textbooks if they can’t help you properly when you get there?

Learning a language so different from English should be fun and culturally relevant. Start by learning how to say “My name is,” in Portuguese and work your way up from there, one step at a time. Asking the right questions, and discovering how to give the proper answers regarding key points in Brazilian culture and lifestyle, can make a real difference.

We hope we adequately answered the question “How do you introduce yourself in Portuguese?” but don’t hesitate to reach out with any questions or concerns you have. Before you go, why not practice what you learned today? Leave us a comment below introducing yourself in Portuguese! We look forward to hearing from you. 🙂

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Brazil’s Valentines Day: Boyfriend and Girlfriend Day

Are you wondering, “When is Valentine’s Day in Brazil?”

National Boyfriend and Girlfriend Day is the equivalent of Valentine’s Day in Brazil, a day set aside for lovers. On Boyfriend and Girlfriend (Valentine’s) Day, Brazil also keeps in mind St. Anthony of Padua, who is known for his teachings on love and marriage.

Learning about National Girlfriend and Boyfriend Day will help you to see Brazil through a clearer lens, in terms of its culture and its take on a holiday you may already be familiar with in your own country. Any successful language-learner can tell you that this is an essential step in mastering your target language, Portuguese.

And at PortuguesePod101.com, we hope to make this—and all—lessons both fun and informative!

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1. What is National Boyfriend and Girlfriend Day?

Also referred to as Lovers Day or Brazil’s Valentine’s Day, the most romantic and special date on the calendar for people with passion in their hearts is Boyfriends and Girlfriends Day. This day is set aside for lovers and sweethearts to express their love for each other through gifts and quality time, just like Valentines Day in other countries.

2. When is National Boyfriend and Girlfriend Day?

Big Red Heart

So, when is Valentine’s Day celebrated in Brazil? Each year, couples in Brazil celebrate Boyfriends and Girlfriends Day on June 12.

This is the eve of the Feast of St. Anthony. Saint Anthony of Padua is much revered in Brazil, and he is invoked to bless wedding ceremonies, because in his religious teachings, he always emphasized the importance of love and marriage. They call him the “Holy Matchmaker.”

3. Reading Practice: How is it Celebrated?

How is Boyfriends and Girlfriends Day celebrated in Brazil? Read the Brazilian Portuguese text below to find out, and find the English translation below it.

A maioria dos casais trocam presentes, chocolates, flores e cartões nesse dia, para demonstrar o amor que sentem. Mas alguns casais de namorados fazem um plano mais elaborado- alguns vão ao seu restaurante preferido, outros preferem ir ao cinema, tem gente que prepara uma viagem romântica. Mas no final, o importante é passar esse dia ao lado de quem você ama.

Esse dia também é esperado por alguns solteiros e solteiras que estão à procura de alguém para casar, mas de uma forma um pouco diferente. Eles fazem simpatias com a imagem de Santo Antônio para encontrar um namorado ou conseguir a pessoa amada. As simpatias normalmente maltratam o santo, deixando-o de ponta-cabeça, ou separando-o do menino Jesus até o santo conseguir um marido para elas.

A teoria mais provável para o início do feriado no Brasil é a de que foi o publicitário João Dória quem bolou o feriado, influenciado pelo dia de São Valentim, para aquecer as vendas do mês de junho, um mês fraco para o comércio.

It is customary for couples to exchange gifts, chocolates, flowers, and cards on this day as an expression of their love. Some make elaborate plans for a special evening either at a favorite restaurant or perhaps the cinema, while others opt for a romantic getaway. But in the end, what matters is that you spend that day in the company of someone you love.

There are also some single men and women who eagerly await this day, because they are seeking marriage, but in rather a different form. They perform the simpatias (“sympathies”) ritual with the image of St. Anthony to help them to meet a boyfriend or find a loved one. The ritual usually involves abuse of the saintly image, leaving it upside down, or separating it from the holy child, Jesus, in order to win a spouse.

A very likely explanation of the origin of this holiday in Brazil is that the impresario John Doria came up with the idea, inspired by Valentine’s Day, to heat up sales in June, a slow trading month.

4. Nicknames for Sweethearts

Couple on Beach Wrapped in Blanket

How do Brazilian lovers affectionately refer to their loved ones?

Apart from “love”—the most commonly used, other pet names for a lover could be: amoreco (“beloved”), môre (“special”), fofo (“fluff”), fofinho (“cuddles”), minha vida (“my life”), meu bebê (“baby”), paixão (“passion”), coração (“heart”), xuxuzinho (“sweet pumpkin”), flor de maracujá (“passion flower”)… The list is endless. Many people like to create their own little pet names for their loved ones.

5. Useful Vocabulary for Boyfriends and Girlfriends Day

St. Anthony of Padua

Here’s the most important vocabulary you should know for Boyfriends and Girlfriends Day in Brazil!

  • Vermelho — “Red
  • Rosa — “Pink”
  • Presente — “Present”
  • Namorada — “Girlfriend”
  • Namorado — “Boyfriend”
  • Amar — “Love”
  • Flor — “Flower”
  • Dia dos Namorados — “Valentine’s Day” (or “Boyfriends and Girlfriends Day”)
  • Chocolate — “Chocolate”
  • Coração — “Heart”
  • Encontro — “Date
  • Abraçar — “Hug”
  • Cartão de dia dos namorados — “Valentine’s Day card”
  • Urso de pelúcia — “Teddy bear”
  • Santo Antônio, o santo casamenteiro — St. Anthony of Padua, patron saint of weddings
  • Romance — “Romance”
  • Carta de amor — “Love letter”
  • Beijo — “Kiss”
  • Apaixonado — “In love
  • Bombom — “Candy with chocolate coating and fondant center”
  • Cupido — “Cupid

To hear each of these vocabulary words pronounced, check out our Boyfriends and Girlfriends Day vocabulary list. Here, each word is listed alongside an audio file of its pronunciation.

Conclusion

What do you think of National Boyfriend and Girlfriend Day in Brazil? Do you celebrate a similar holiday in your country? And, most important, which of the adorable Portuguese sweetheart nicknames are you most likely to start calling your xuxuzinho (“sweet pumpkin”)? 😉 Let us know in the comments!

To learn more about Brazilian culture and the Portuguese language, visit us at PortuguesePod101.com and begin your journey to language mastery! There’s something here for every learner, from insightful blog posts like this one to free Portuguese vocabulary lists to help you expand your word knowledge. You can also upgrade to a Premium Plus account to begin using our MyTeacher program, or set up a basic account to start chatting with fellow Portuguese learners on our forums!

Know that it is possible to become fluent in Portuguese, and your hard work is going to pay off. PortuguesePod101 will be here with you for every step of the journey there!

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