Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Sílvia: Olá! Bem-vindo ao PortuguesePod101.com!
Braden: Upper Beginner Season 1, Lesson 25, Getting Things Done in Brazil. Hello and welcome back to PortuguesePod101.com, the fastest, easiest, and most fun way to learn Portuguese. I’m joined here in the studio by…
Sílvia: Hello, everyone! Sílvia here.
Braden: What are we gonna be learning in this lesson?
Sílvia: In this lesson, you’ll learn the present progressive tense.
Braden: Okay. So, where does this conversation take place and who is between?
Sílvia: This conversation takes place at night, at a friend’s house, and it’s between Luciana and Sérgio.
Braden: And what’s the formality level?
Sílvia: Well, Luciana and Sérgio are co-workers, so the conversation here will be semi-formal.
Braden: Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Luciana: Quem faz esse tipo de trabalho?
Sérgio: Bem meu amigo está trabalhando com uma empresa que faz esse tipo de serviço.
Luciana: Você pode falar com ele? Estou precisando.
Sérgio: Falo com ele amanhã. Ele vai almoçar lá em casa.
Luciana: Obrigada.
Sérgio: Nada. Disponha.
Braden: One time slowly.
Luciana: Quem faz esse tipo de trabalho?
Sérgio: Bem meu amigo está trabalhando com uma empresa que faz esse tipo de serviço.
Luciana: Você pode falar com ele? Estou precisando.
Sérgio: Falo com ele amanhã. Ele vai almoçar lá em casa.
Luciana: Obrigada.
Sérgio: Nada. Disponha.
Braden: One time fast, with translation.
Luciana: Quem faz esse tipo de coisa?
Luciana: Who does this kind of thing?
Sérgio: Bem meu amigo está trabalhando com uma empresa que faz esse tipo de serviço.
Sérgio: Well, my friend is working for a company that does this kind of work.
Luciana: Você pode falar com ele? Estou precisando.
Luciana: Could you talk to him? I really need it.
Sérgio: Falo com ele amanhã. Ele vai almoçar lá em casa.
Sérgio: I'll talk to him tomorrow. He's going to eat lunch at my house.
Luciana: Obrigada.
Luciana: Thank you.
Sérgio: Nada. Disponha.
Sérgio: It's nothing. Whatever you need...
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Braden: Sílvia, tell us a little bit about construction in Brazil.
Sílvia: Well, I think it’s, at least here in Brazil, it’s a great opportunity for investment. Some places are doubling their value in less than 3 years.
Braden: I was wondering, actually, you know very much about construction in Brazil, how it’s done?
Sílvia: Well, from the time I spent in North Carolina is their construction in Brazil is quite different from what I saw in the United States. How do you see the difference?
Braden: I think the same way. My father actually worked construction for a while and I learned a lot from him about how to maintain a house and do your own remodelling and stuff like that. But in Brazil, I’m pretty much incapable of doing anything, because the construction techniques are so different.
Sílvia: Like what?
Braden: Well, for one, Brazilians don’t use wood to build their homes. In the United States, almost all homes are wood framed, and in Brazil, they’re not. It’s all concrete or brick or something to that effect, even inside their homes. And the bricks are even different than the normal American kind of bricks, ‘cause I had a house made of brick when I was younger, but the ones that they use in Brazil are kind of rectangular in the same way, but they’re about three times bigger than your standard brick in the United States. It’s very different. Another problem that I’ve had often is hanging pictures on walls, because there’s no sheetrock. So, you’re actually drilling, trying to put a nail straight into concrete to try and hang a picture or a frame or anything like that on the wall. You have to do that at your house?
Sílvia: Yes, yes.
Braden: You did? That’s how it is, everywhere, and I’m just not used to that. I’m getting used to it. We started using Velcro actually, taping Velcro to the wall and attaching our pictures to the Velcro and that’s been working well so far. Anyway, there’s some fun thing that you learn as you spend time in Brazil, different construction patterns. Let’s take a look at the vocabulary.
VOCAB LIST
Braden: The first word we’ll look at is…
Sílvia: quem [natural native speed]
Braden: who, whom
Sílvia: quem [slowly - broken down by syllable] quem [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Sílvia: serviço [natural native speed]
Braden: service, work
Sílvia: serviço [slowly - broken down by syllable] serviço [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Sílvia: disponha [natural native speed]
Braden: have, arrange, count on
Sílvia: disponha [slowly - broken down by syllable] disponha [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Sílvia: almoçar [natural native speed]
Braden: to lunch, to each lunch
Sílvia: almoçar [slowly - broken down by syllable] almoçar [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Sílvia: precisar [natural native speed]
Braden: to need
Sílvia: precisar [slowly - broken down by syllable] precisar [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Sílvia: empresa [natural native speed]
Braden: company, business
Sílvia: empresa [slowly - broken down by syllable] empresa [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Sílvia: trabalho [natural native speed]
Braden: work, job
Sílvia: trabalho [slowly - broken down by syllable] trabalho [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Sílvia: coisa [natural native speed]
Braden: thing
Sílvia: coisa [slowly - broken down by syllable] coisa [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Sílvia: tipo [natural native speed]
Braden: type, kind
Sílvia: tipo [slowly - broken down by syllable] tipo [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Sílvia: falar [natural native speed]
Braden: to speak, to talk
Sílvia: falar [slowly - broken down by syllable] falar [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Sílvia: obrigado [natural native speed]
Braden: thank you
Sílvia: obrigado [slowly - broken down by syllable] obrigado [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Sílvia: andar [natural native speed]
Braden: to walk
Sílvia: andar [slowly - broken down by syllable] andar [natural native speed]
Braden: And our last word is…
Sílvia: dormindo [natural native speed]
Braden: sleeping
Sílvia: dormindo [slowly - broken down by syllable] dormindo [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Braden: Okay, so let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases in this lesson.
Sílvia: The first phrase we’ll look at is estou precisando.
Braden: Which we translated as “I need it.” A more exact translation would be “I am needing” which leaves off the “it.” Why do we leave off the “it”?
Sílvia: This is because Portuguese frequently uses inferred subjects, so even though the "it" is necessary in English, it isn't in Portuguese.
Braden: And for that matter, Portuguese doesn’t even have the word “it.” Could you break this down for us.
Sílvia: estou precisando
Braden: And one time fast.
Sílvia: estou precisando
Braden: What’s our next phrase?
Sílvia: The next phrase we’ll look at is lá em casa.
Braden: In Lesson 8, we talked about the phrase "em casa" to mean "at my house" or "lá em casa" to mean “at my house.” Here, we see the phrase again. Could you break this down for us?
Sílvia: lá em casa
Braden: And one time fast.
Sílvia: lá em casa
Braden: What’s our next word?
Sílvia: The next word we’ll look at is disponha. Disponha is a polite way to say “at your service” and it is often used at the end of conversations.
Braden: Could you break this down for us?
Sílvia: disponha
Braden: And one time fast.
Sílvia: disponha
Braden: Let’s take a look at the grammar point.

Lesson focus

Sílvia: The focus of this lesson is the present progressive tense.
Braden: In the dialouge, we heard the phrase…
Sílvia: Você pode falar com ele? Estou precisando.
Braden: Which we translated as “Could you talk to him? I really need it." A great way to practice verb conjugation is when you hear or read a conjugated verb, reverse conjugate it back to its infinitive form, then look it up. Your mind will start being able to put together the patterns if you do this and you'll learn the verbs much faster.
Sílvia: This applies well to the present progressive tense. The present progressive tense indicates an action which is taking place at the present time.
Braden: For example, I am staying or we are eating or they are leaving. This is the present progressive tense in English. The present progrgessive in Portuguese consists of the conjugated form of estar followed by the present participle of the verb.
Sílvia: For example, we conjugated the verb estar let’s say to “está” and then add a present participole like tendo, vindo, or andando.
Braden: Now, we’re gonna take a look at how to form the participle. In English, the present participles often a verb ending in -ing, like “He is speaking” or “We are studying.” That is the present participle. In Portuguese, the equivalent is “-ndo.”
Sílvia: To form the present participle from any infinitive, drop the -r and add -ndo. It’s that simple.
Braden: Could you give us some examples?
Sílvia: Sure. For example, with the verb falar - falando, with the verb comer - comendo, and with the verb dormir - dormindo.
Braden: Okay, so you just drop the last “r” and then add on -ndo.
Sílvia: That’s right.
Braden: Excellent. Could you give us some sample sentences.
Sílvia: Sure. The sentence “Vocês estão correndo”, which translates to “They are running.”
Braden: So, this is how you build the present progressive in Portuguese. It’s very simple.

Outro

Braden: So that just about does it for this lesson! Thanks for listening!
Sílvia: Até então!

19 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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O que você está fazendo agora? What are you doing now?

PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:33 PM
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Olá, Rafael Abdala!


Que bom está gostando das lições! É um prazer. Obrigado por seu comentário.


Sincerely

Marcia

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Rafael Abdala
Friday at 05:14 PM
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enamorado*

Rafael Abdala
Friday at 05:12 PM
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Primeira vez que eu ouvi destas liçoes e eu já fiquei namorado delas!

PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Monday at 05:59 AM
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Hi Jaimie,


That's great!


Please don't forget to use the accent in "ê" in "português" (Portuguese). 👍


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Jaimie
Saturday at 04:53 AM
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Estou estudando portugues agora.

PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Saturday at 01:46 AM
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Olá Alkan,


Thank you for joining us!


Just one minor note:


As "lição" (lesson) is a feminine noun, it's necessary to use a feminine gender noun to qualify it. Therefore, we have:

"ótima lição" (excellent lesson)


Should you have any questions, please let us know.


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Alkan
Friday at 06:07 AM
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Lição otimo! Estou aprendendo Português agora 😎

PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Sunday at 06:09 PM
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Olá Barry,


Thank you for posting.


Great to know that you're coming to Brazil soon.


Just a few notes on your text:

"imóvel" (singular)

"imóveis" (plural)

meaning: building, house, apartment

Please check out the entry (singular) at our Portuguese Dictionary (includes audio):

https://www.portuguesepod101.com/learningcenter/reference/dictionary/im%C3%B3vel

You can use this resource to check out any words you wish to confirm the writing :)


In Portuguese we use "Brasil" with "s".


"As informações (...) são muito interessantes (...)" The noun "informações" is in the plural form and requires a plural adjective " interessantes" (interesting).


"Eu e minha esposa compramos um terreno recentemente (...)"

"My wife and I recently bought land (...)"


"(...) vamos voltar ao Brasil (...) "

"(...) we'll return to Brazil (...)"


Feel free to let us know if you have any questions. :)


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Barry
Saturday at 02:37 AM
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As informacoes sobre a construcao dos imovies no Brazil e muito interessando para mim. Eu e a minha esposa compraram um terreno recentemente, e nos vamos voltar no Brasil em Junho para comecar construir uma casa pequena.

Portuguesepod101.com Verified
Monday at 05:21 PM
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Olá Ricardo,


Obrigada por seu comentário.

Thanks for your comments.


Our team will work on it to fix it. Thank you!


In case you have any doubts, please let us know.


Cristiane

Team Portuguesepod101.com