Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Sílvia: Bom dia! Bem-vindo ao PortuguesePod101.com!
Braden: Upper Beginner Season 1, lesson 24, Dance Your Way into a Portuguese Party Invitation. Hello and welcome back to PortuguesePod101.com, the fastest, easiest, and most fun way to learn Portuguese. I’m joined in the studio by…
Sílvia: Hello, everyone! Sílvia here. So Braden, please tell us what we’ll be learning in this lesson.
Braden: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to conjugate and use ter and vir in the present tense.
Sílvia: Where does this conversation take place and who is it between?
Braden: This conversation takes place in the morning, at school, and it’s between Giselle and Samuel.
Sílvia: What’s the formality level?
Braden: Well, they’re friends so they’ll be speaking pretty informally.
Sílvia: Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Giselle: Eles tem que vir. A festa vai ser tão chata se eles não vierem.
Samuel: Eu não acho tão importante assim e não vai ser chata. Tem muita gente boa por aqui.
Giselle: Eu sei mas esses dois são tão divertidos.
Samuel: São mesmo. Tam bém os dois têm o dom de dançar.
Giselle: Ta vendo. Eles tem que vir.
Braden: One time slowly.
Giselle: Eles tem que vir. A festa vai ser tão chata se eles não vierem.
Samuel: Eu não acho tão importante assim e não vai ser chata. Tem muita gente boa por aqui.
Giselle: Eu sei mas esses dois são tão divertidos.
Samuel: São mesmo. Também os dois têm o dom de dançar.
Giselle: Ta vendo. Eles tem que vir.
Braden: One time fast, with translation.
Giselle: Eles tem que vir. A festa vai ser tão chata se eles não vierem.
Giselle: But they have to come. The party will be so dull if they don't come.
Samuel: Eu não acho tão importante assim e não vai ser chata. Tem muita gente boa por aqui.
Samuel: I don't think it's that important and it won't be dull. There are a lot of great people around here.
Giselle: Eu sei mas esses dois são tão divertidos.
Giselle: I know but these two are so fun.
Samuel: São mesmo. Também os dois têm o dom de dançar.
Samuel: Yes they are. Also both of them have the gift of dance.
Giselle: Ta vendo. Eles tem que vir.
Giselle: You see. They have to come.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Braden: Okay, Sílvia, could you tell us a little bit about the differences between American and Brazilian dancing?
Sílvia: One thing you know by now is that Brazilians know how to dance, at least most of us do. There are several types of dance that have been embedded in Brazil and become popular throughout the world.
Braden: Probably, the most famous is zumba.
Sílvia: Yeah, Zumba.
Braden: Okay, that’s how you say it. Zumba developed in Bahia along with several other types of dance, but over the years has become the hallmark of the Carnaval Celebration in Rio and São Paulo.
Sílvia: Interestingly enough, Zumba is almost nonexistent in the Carnaval in Salvador Bahia, where the world’s largest carnival celebrations are held.
Braden: I’ve heard it said that only Brazilians can dance Zumba because it requires a type of rhythmic movement that centered around hips and moving around and expands from there to the rest of the bottom. Americans and Europeans as well tend to be just a little too stiff to be able to dance the Zumba. Have you noticed that?
Sílvia: Yeah.
Braden: Yeah.
Sílvia: But I think it’s just lack of practice.
Braden: Okay, let’s take a look at the vocabulary.
VOCAB LIST
Braden: The first word we’ll look at is…
Sílvia: festa [natural native speed]
Braden: party
Sílvia: festa [slowly - broken down by syllable] festa [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Sílvia: chato [natural native speed]
Braden: jerk, irritating
Sílvia: chato [slowly - broken down by syllable] chato [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Sílvia: vêm [natural native speed]
Braden: they come, you all come
Sílvia: vêm [slowly - broken down by syllable] vêm [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Sílvia: divertido [natural native speed]
Braden: fun
Sílvia: divertido [slowly - broken down by syllable] divertido [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Sílvia: dançar [natural native speed]
Braden: to dance
Sílvia: dançar [slowly - broken down by syllable] dançar [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Sílvia: importante [natural native speed]
Braden: important
Sílvia: importante [slowly - broken down by syllable] importante [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Sílvia: gente [natural native speed]
Braden: people, person
Sílvia: gente [slowly - broken down by syllable] gente [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Sílvia: vir [natural native speed]
Braden: to come
Sílvia: vir [slowly - broken down by syllable] vir [natural native speed]
Braden: Next
Sílvia: ter [natural native speed]
Braden: to have
Sílvia: ter [slowly - broken down by syllable] ter [natural native speed]
Braden: And our last word is...
Sílvia: mesmo [natural native speed]
Braden: really
Sílvia: mesmo [slowly - broken down by syllable] mesmo [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases in this lesson.
Sílvia: The first phrase we’ll look at is - ta vendo, viu?
Braden: In the dialogue we heard this phrase "ta vendo" in almost the same way that English uses "See?" Brazilians say this a lot, especially if whatever they’re saying is somehow substantiated by current events. Could you give us an example sentence of this phrase?
Sílvia: “É como eu falei, tá vendo? Viu?” The translation would be, “It’s just as I said, see?”
Braden: See? I’m right!
Sílvia: Yeah. It’s kind of emphasizing what I said before to show the evidence.
Braden: Could you break this down for us?
Sílvia: Ta vendo, viu?
Braden: And one time fast.
Sílvia: Ta vendo, viu?
Braden: And what’s our next phrase?
Sílvia: The next phrase we’ll look at is vêm vs. veem.
Braden: This is a very careful pronunciation difference, isn’t it?
Sílvia: Yes. Vêm means "they come" and veem means "they see." It's always good to speak correctly, but if you can't get it right at first, you can always use the present progressive and say estão vendo (they are seeing) or estão vindo (they are coming).
Braden: That simplifies it a little bit. The difference in pronunciation here is that the vêm , which means “they come” is faster. It’s just a little tiny bit shorter.
Sílvia: Correct.
Braden: And then the one that’s “they see” is a little tiny bit longer.
Sílvia: Veem
Braden: But when you’re speaking really fast…
Sílvia: Vêm and veem
Braden: Almost indistinguishable. Do you sometimes get confused or can you always tell?
Sílvia: You can also tell by the context, but sometimes, my ear doesn’t get it.
Braden: Before the new orthography that came out just about 2 years go, veem, the “they see” was written with a circumflex over that first “e.” But now, it’s not there anymore, that was removed, but the pronunciation stays the same. The correct way to spell it now is without the accent or you’re going to see it with and without, depending on which books you read and which websites and so forth. Could you break down “they come”?
Sílvia: eles vêm
Braden: And one time fast.
Sílvia: eles vêm
Braden: And could you break down “they see”?
Sílvia: eles veem
Braden: And one time fast.
Sílvia: eles veem
Braden: Let’s move on to the grammar point.

Lesson focus

Sílvia: The focus of this lesson is ter and vir in the present tense.
Braden: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase…
Sílvia: Eles tem que vir.
Braden: Which we translated as “But they have to come.”
Sílvia: "Ter" and "vir" are two frequently used verbs in Portuguese. For the most part, these two verbs are used exactly the same as their English counterparts. There are some exceptions, but we'll go over them in later sessions.
Braden: Ter and vir have extremely similar conjugation patterns, so it’s worthwhile to learn them together.
Sílvia: Ter means "to have" and in the present tense, it is conjugated as; eu tenho, tu tens, ele/ela tem, nós temos, vós tendes, eles têm.
Braden: Could you give some examples on how to use this verb.
Sílvia: Eu tenho dois irmãos. “I have two brothers.”
Braden: Ter is conjugated to the present tense, first person form. And how about one more example?
Sílvia: Nós temos muito dinheiro. "We have a lot of money."
Braden: Okay and here, the verb ter is conjugated to the first person plural, so that would be “we” or nós. How about another example?
Sílvia: Ele tem sorte. "He has luck" or "He’s lucky."
Braden: How is the verb conjugated here?
Sílvia: The verb is conjugated here, third person singular, ele or ela tem.
Braden: How about one last example sentence?
Sílvia: Eles têm muitos amigos. "They have many friends."
Braden: And how is the verb conjugated here?
Sílvia: Third person plural, eles or elas têm. We’ve got a circumflex accent over the ê.
Braden: Is there any difference in pronunciation between the third person plural and the third person singular, ‘cause one has a circumflex and the other doesn’t?
Sílvia: There isn’t any pronunciation change.
Braden: So they’re identical when you say them.
Sílvia: Yes. It’s just when you write it, you have to put a circumflex accent, if we’re talking about the third person plural.
Braden: Let’s take a look at the verb vir.
Sílvia: Vir means “to come.” It is also an irregular verb and in the present tense is conjugated like this; eu venho, tu vens, ele vem, nós vimos, vós vindes, eles/elas vêm.
Braden: Could you give us some examples of this verb?
Sílvia: Eu venho depois das dezoito horas. "I'll come at six p.m."
Braden: Here, the verb is conjugated to the first person singular.
Sílvia: Right.
Braden: Eu venho. Notice how the pattern of conjugation is almost identical to that of the verb ter, eu venho - eu tenho.
Sílvia: Right.
Braden: How about another example?
Sílvia: Ele vem aqui todo dia? "Does he come here every day?"
Braden: And how is the verb conjugated here?
Sílvia: It’s conjugated third person singular, ele or elsa vem.
Braden: And once again, almost identical to the verb ter. So, tem, tem. How about another example?
Sílvia: Elas vêm na sexta. "They'll come on Friday."
Braden: How is this verb conjugated?
Sílvia: It’s conjugated third person plural, elas or eles vêm.
Braden: And once again, identical, almost, to the verb ter. One more sentence.
Sílvia: Nós vimos do Paraná. "We come from Paraná." This is actually past and present because the words are both past and present.

Outro

Braden: That just about does it for this lesson! Tchau pra vocês!
Sílvia: Tchau-tchau!

11 Comments

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PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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What is your favorite Brazilian dance?

PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 02:21 AM
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Hi Pimentinha.


You're welcome!


Please note that "chato/a" is used for people too, as in "Ai, que menino chato!" (Oh, what an annoying boy!"), but meaning "annoying".


For situations, this "chato/a" means "boring", as in "Aquela aula de história estava tão chata!" (That history class was so boring!).


If you can’t find a desired entry, then try our custom list feature here:

https://www.portuguesepod101.com/custom-lists/


If you have any questions, please let us know. :)


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Pimentinha
Monday at 11:58 AM
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Obrigada, Cristiane! It helps to know that chato / chata is used for situations and not for people. Irritante will be easy enough to remember. I wish there were a way to add entediante to my word bank.

PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Monday at 12:41 AM
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Hi Pimentinha.


Thank you for posting.


"chato" is more used as an adjective to really mean "importunate" / ""annoying" / "boring".


So we have, for example:

"Ai, que menino chato!" (Oh, what an annoying boy!")

"Aquela aula de história estava tão chata!" (That history class was so boring!)


In the sentence you wrote, "Minha professora é chata." (please note that the adjective is gender specific, so for a female teacher we use "chata") most likely the meaning would be "annoying". The "boring" meaning is usually more related to situations, like the one used as an example above (aula chata) (boring class).


Another word used for "annoying" is " irritante"; for "boring" we can also use "entediante".


We hope this helps!


In case of any questions, please feel free to contact us.


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Pimentinha
Saturday at 11:15 AM
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I struggle with the word chato because it has such different meanings that are not synonymous in English (boring, annoying). Now we add jerk to the mix! Does that indicate that chato can be used as a noun as well as an adjective?


My friends use chato a lot, but to me the meaning is really vague and can't necessarily rely on context. For instance, if someone said, "Minha professora é chato", I would not be able to tell if the teacher was not engaging or is she had irritating behaviors. Are there other commonly used Portuguese words for boring and annoying that are more specific to the characteristics associated with the English words?

Portuguesepod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 01:16 AM
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Hi Niki,


Thank you for posting.


"Tu" (you) is conjugated with the second person singular conjugation. The example used "tu tens" (you have). This person pronoun is not frequently used in Brazil, except for in the country's southern states. But this person pronoun is part of the standard verb conjugation as the second person singular, that is why it was used in the conjugation chart.


"Você" (you) is widely used in Brazil and it requires the third person singular conjugation (that is, the same form of the verb as with "he" or "she"). For example: "você tem (...)" (you have...).


The same happens with "vós" (you, plural) - second person plural conjugation - vs. "vocês" (you, plural, informal) - requires the 3rd. person plural conjugation.


However, please check out our gramar bank entry. It shows all person pronoun and their corresponding positions regarding the type of conjugation they use:

https://www.portuguesepod101.com/learningcenter/reference/grammar/11?


Please let us know if you have any further questions.


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team Portuguesepod101.com

Niki
Monday at 11:07 PM
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When listing the verb conjugations, why did she use tu and vos instead of voce and voces?

Portuguesepod101.com Verified
Thursday at 05:44 PM
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Hi Darren,


Thank you for your message.

Regarding the verbs "to see" and "to come" we're understanding that you'd need more details about verb conjugation, right?


As for the verb "to come" (vir), it is conjugated in the Lesson Notes pdf. Could you kindly download it?


As for the verb "to see" (ver), please find it conjugated below (present tense):

eu vejo

tu vês

ele vê

nós vemos

vós vedes

eles veem


If you have any questions, please let us know.:wink:


Cristiane

Team Portuguesepod101.com

Darren M.
Wednesday at 04:32 AM
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Very confusing. To see and to come. More advice?

PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 09:58 AM
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Oi Caren,


Isso mesmo! That's right!

We apologize for the mistake :disappointed: but we've fixed it already.


Thanks for letting us know, and feel free to ask us any questions!

Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Caren
Sunday at 11:29 PM
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I think there's a mistake in the pdf.


Vêm means "they see" and Veem means "they come."


Isn't it the other way around?