Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
In this lesson, we’ll introduce the directions that will help you find the place you are looking for. Previously, we introduced “Is there a (place) near here?” and “Where is …(something)?” But while we can now ask, we haven’t addressed how to decipher the answer. This time we’re going to work on understanding what someone tells us. And we’ll go over basic directions. First, we have “go straight.”
GRAMMAR POINT
In Portuguese, “go straight” is
vá em frente.
Let’s break it down:
(slow) vá em fren-te.
Once more:
vá em frente.
The first word, vá, is a form of the verb that means “to go”.
(slow) vá.
vá.
And the phrase, em frente can be translated as “in front”
(slow) em fren-te
em frente
Altogether, they make
vá em frente.
It literally means “go to the front”, but it is translated as “go straight”.
A variation of this sentence that is widely used is:
Vá sempre em frente.
Let’s break it down:
(slow) Vá sem-pre em fren-te.
Once more:
Vá sempre em frente.
Here we just added the word sempre, that means “always”
(slow) sem-pre
sempre
Once again, it is:
Vá sempre em frente.
It’s translated as “go always straight” or “keep going straight”.
Here’s how to say “on the right”:
À direita.
(slow) À di-rei-ta.
À direita.
And “on the left” is À esquerda.
(slow) À esquerda.
À esquerda.
Here’s how to tell someone to take a left.
Vire à esquerda.
Let’s break it down:
(slow) Vi-re à es-quer-da.
Once more:
Vire à esquerda.
The first word, vire is translated as “turn”
(slow) Vi-re.
Vire.
The next two words à esquerda mean “to the left”
(slow) À es-quer-da.
À esquerda.
Together, they make
Vire à esquerda.
The opposite, “take a right” in Portuguese is
Vire à direita.
(slow) Vi-re à di-rei-ta.
Vire à direita.
As you’ve probably figured out, à direita means “to the right.”
(slow) À direita.
À direita.
In real life, of course, you’ll need to know where to turn left or right.
Here’s “Turn right at the traffic light”:
Vire à direita no semáforo.
Let’s break it down:
(slow) Vi-re à di-re-ta no se-má-fo-ro.
Again at natural speed:
Vire à direita no semáforo.
Semáforo means “traffic light.” In our sentence we have no semáforo, which is translated as “at the traffic light.”
(slow) No se-má-fo-ro.
No semáforo.
Another way of explaining direction can be: “at the first intersection on the right”. In Portuguese, that is:
Primeiro cruzamento à direita.
(slow) Pri-mei-ro cru-za-men-to à di-rei-ta.
Primeiro cruzamento à direita.
primeiro means “first”.
(slow) Pri-mei-ro.
Primeiro.
Next we have cruzamento which means “intersection”.
(slow) Cru-za-men-to.
Cruzamento.
Once again, altogether it is:
Primeiro cruzamento à direita.

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Hi listeners! Now you know how to ask and how to answer, please practice here!