Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Braden: Hello, and welcome to PortuguesePOD101.com, where we study modern Portuguese in a fun, educational format!
Camila: So, brush up on the Portuguese that you started learning long ago, or start learning today.
Braden: Thanks for being here with us for this lesson, Camila, what are we looking at in this lesson?
Thássia: So Braden, please tell us what we will be learning in this lesson.
Braden: In this lesson, we'll be learning how to make positive requests and negative requests
Thássia: Where does this conversation take place and who is it between?
Braden: This conversation takes place at night in a bar.
Thássia: What's the formality level?
Braden: Well, the speakers are at a bar, so they'll be speaking informally.
Thássia: Let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Renata: E aí, cê não tá bebendo não Alisson?
Alisson: Tô não.
Renata: Por que cê não tá bebendo?
Alisson: Porque sou eu que tô dirijindo.
Renata: Bebe menino, não tem problema não! Uma cervejinha só não vai fazer mal não.
Alisson: “Não vai fazer mal não” (sarcastico) Ai ai. E a lei seca, o que eu faço se tiver fiscalização?
Renata: Não tem fiscalização por aqui não. Toma!
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Renata: E aí, cê não tá bebendo não Alisson?
Alisson: Tô não.
Renata: Por que cê não tá bebendo?
Alisson: Porque sou eu que tô dirijindo.
Renata: Bebe menino, não tem problema não! Uma cervejinha só não vai fazer mal não.
Alisson: “Não vai fazer mal não” (sarcastico) Ai ai. E a lei seca, o que eu faço se tiver fiscalização?
Renata: Não tem fiscalização por aqui não. Toma!
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Renata: E aí, cê não tá bebendo não Alisson?
Braden: Hey, aren't you drinking Alisson?
Alisson: Tô não.
Braden: No, I'm not.
Renata: Por que cê não tá bebendo?
Braden: Why aren't you drinking?
Alisson: Porque sou eu que tô dirijindo.
Braden: Because I'm the one who's driving.
Renata: Bebe menino, não tem problema não! Uma cervejinha só não vai fazer mal não.
Braden: Drink boy, there's nothing wrong with it! One little beer won't cause any harm.
Alisson: “Não vai fazer mal não” (sarcastico) Ai ai. E a lei seca, o que eu faço se tiver fiscalização?
Braden: "Won't cause any harm?" (sarcastic) Oh my. And the dry law? What do I do if there's a police inspection?
Renata: Não tem fiscalização por aqui não. Toma!
Braden: There won't be any inspections around here. Drink!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
(Peter always does a little review about the previous lessons. explain what you are thinking about the storyline in the lesson, so the students can follow and participate - don't make them guess.)
Braden: Until recently, Brazil drinking and driving laws were such that you could drink a bit and still drive.
Thássia: I believe in 2004 that the law changed to what is called the Lei Seca or Dry Law. This is a no tolerance law if you have had anything to drink, you'll be detained and probably straight out arrested.
Braden: The punishments in the law are very hard with high fines and jail time.
Thássia: A year after the law passed there was a celebration because that year the accidents and deaths caused by drinking under the influence had diminished dramatically.
Braden: However the next year DUIs had again increased and dramatically. After the first year, it was noticed that the punishments, while quite harsh, were rarely enforced.
VOCAB LIST
Braden: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Camila: cerveja [natural native speed]
Braden: beer
Camila: cerveja [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Camila: cerveja [natural native speed]
: Next:
Camila: beber [natural native speed]
Braden: to drink
Camila: beber [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Camila: beber [natural native speed]
: Next:
Camila: dirigir [natural native speed]
Braden: drive
Camila: dirigir [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Camila: dirigir [natural native speed]
: Next:
Camila: fiscalização [natural native speed]
Braden: control, supervision, inspection
Camila: fiscalização [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Camila: fiscalização [natural native speed]
: Next:
Camila: multa [natural native speed]
Braden: fine, ticket
Camila: multa [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Camila: multa [natural native speed]
: Next:
Camila: preso [natural native speed]
Braden: arrested
Camila: preso [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Camila: preso [natural native speed]
: Next:
Camila: arriscar [natural native speed]
Braden: to risk
Camila: arriscar [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Camila: arriscar [natural native speed]
: Next:
Camila: bêbado [natural native speed]
Braden: drunk, drunkard
Camila: bêbado [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Camila: bêbado [natural native speed]
: Next:
Camila: segurança [natural native speed]
Braden: safety, security
Camila: segurança [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Camila: segurança [natural native speed]
: Next:
Camila: blitz [natural native speed]
Braden: police blitz, police blockade
Camila: blitz [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Camila: blitz [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Thássia: The first phrase we’ll look at is não vai fazer mal.
Braden: Literally translated, não vai fazer mal means “Will not make bad.” But não vai fazer mal is used to mean “It won’t cause you any harm” or simple “there no problem in doing it.”
Thássia: When someone says to you “não vai fazer mal” it’s generally because what they are referring to actually will cause harm or at least it seems like it will.
Braden: This expression is often used when someone is trying to reassure you about something or convince you to do something.
Thássia: The problem is that it may actually be harmful or they may be persuading you to break some rule or law. Use good judgment.
Braden: Next we’ll look at Não tem problema não which means and works like “no problem”.
Thássia: In the expression não tem problema não we see the repetition of the word não to emphasize.
Braden: Although não tem problema não means “no problem” sometimes it is used like the previous expression, não vai fazer mal, to persude you to do something that might cause you problems.
Thássia: Next we’ll look at the word menino. Menino is the Portuguese word for boy.
Braden: In the dialogue for this lesson, we saw Renata use it with another meaning - "Young man."
Thássia: Mostly women use menino to mean “young man,” men tend to use some other expressions we will look at in other lessons.

Lesson focus

Braden: What are we going to look at in this lesson?
Thássia: The focus of this lesson is the present participle and the present progressive tense. in the dialogue we heard the phrase “Porque sou eu que to dirijindo.”
Braden: Which we translated as “Because I’m the one who’s driving.” This in an example of the present participle in action.
Thássia: The present participle in English is often a verb ending in “-ing,” as in the sentences, “He is speaking,” and “We are studying.”
Braden: The Portuguese equivalent of the “-ing” ending is -ndo. To form the present participle from any infinitive, drop the -r and add -ndo.
Thássia: Some examples are falar which becomes falando, comer which becomes comendo and dormir which becomes dormindo.
Braden: Knowing the present participle is essential to using the present progressive tense.
Thássia: The present progressive tense indicates an action which is taking place at the present time.
Braden: These are sentences like I am studying, We are eating, They are leaving.
Thássia: The present progressive in Portuguese consists of the conjugated form of estar followed by the present tense participle of the verb.
Braden: For example, eu estou andando means I am walking and você está correndo means You are running.
Thássia: And lastly, Elas estão sorrindo means they are smiling.
Braden: Some examples from our dialogue are E aí, cê não tá bebendo não alisson? – "Hey, aren’t you drinking Alison?”
Thássia: and Por que cê não ta bebendo? – "Why aren’t drinking?”
Braden: and we have 4 sample sentences for this lesson.
Ele está falando com o professor dele. – “He is speaking with his teacher.”
Thássia: next is Eu estou escrevendo para minha namorada. – “I am writing to my girlfriend.”
Braden: next is Eles estão tendo problemas. – “They are having problems.”
Thássia: the last one is a question - O que você está fazendo? – “What are you doing?”
Braden: The present is a frequently used grammar construction and you will use it frequently in almost any daily conversation. Luckily it’s really easy.

4 Comments

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PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 6:30 pm
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Have you ever had to say no like this?

Jaimie
Thursday at 4:13 am
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Eu acho que esta mal tomar e dirigir um carro. Eu tambem gosto de festejar ocasionalmente mas eu sempre pego um taxi ou uber.

PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 11:33 am
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Oi Greg,


Well, some of those words are actually the short form of other words, and one is a set phrase:

E aí: Hey, so

tô -> estou (to be)

cê -> você (you)

tá -> está

ao -> contraction: preposition "a" + article "o" (to the)


I think you'll get used to it, especially when you find that it's easier (and shorter) to say "Eu tô" or "Ele tá" then "Eu estou" or "Ele está"!

But the good thing is that we use them exactly in the same place we would add the "long" version of those words!


As a final tip, don't worry about using it in the beginning. That's the way we speak in Brazil (our fast version), but if you speak using all the words correctly, of course people will understand you!

We just want to make sure you'll be able to understand the meaning of those words when you arrive in Brazil.


I hope it helps, please let me know if you have further questions!

Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101

Greg Alsch
Sunday at 7:02 am
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Are there any grammerical rules that help explain what the two letter words like ai, to, ce, ta, ao and all the others mean. They are more difficult to remember than the words with more letters. Thank you for your response.