Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Sílvia: Hello everyone! I'm Sílvia, and welcome to PortuguesePOD101.com.
Braden: With us, you'll learn to speak Portuguese with fun and effective lessons.
Sílvia: We also provide you with cultural insights...
Braden: ...and tips you won't find in a textbook.
Thássia: So Braden, please tell us what we will be learning in this lesson.
Braden: In this lesson, you'll be learning Understanding Brazilian Culture
Thássia: Where does this conversation take place and who is it between?
Braden: This conversation takes place At night during a power-outage and it's between Sofia and Débora.
Thássia: What's the formality level?
Braden: Well, Formal, because the story is formal
Thássia: Let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Daniel: E a lenda da mula sem cabeça, você lembra?
Sofia: Claro, essa foi a vovó quem nos contou, lembra?
Daniel: (hesitante) hum.. não muito bem. Como era mesmo que a vovó contava?
Sofia: Era uma vez uma mulher que foi amaldiçoada por ter namorado um padre. Desde então, toda madrugada de quinta para sexta-feira ela se transformava em Mula-sem-cabeça. Ela percorria sete povoados e quem a encontrasse pelo caminho seria atacado, e teria seus olhos, unhas e dedos comidos. Algumas pessoas que já a viram dizem que ao encontrá-la você deve deitar no chão, esconder unhas e dentes para que ela não o ataque. Também dizem que ela também pode querer arrancar a SUA cabeça.
Daniel: Lembra que a vovó também dizia que nas noites em que ela aparece é possível se escutar seus relinchos e seu galope, que parece um cavalo enfurecido?
Sofia: (haha) Lembro sim. Acho que a vovó nos contava essas histórias para que nós ficássemos com medo e a abraçássemos.
(risos)
Daniel: Uhum, provavelmente!
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Daniel: E a lenda da mula sem cabeça, você lembra?
Sofia: Claro, essa foi a vovó quem nos contou, lembra?
Daniel: (hesitante) hum.. não muito bem. Como era mesmo que a vovó contava?
Sofia: Era uma vez uma mulher que foi amaldiçoada por ter namorado um padre. Desde então, toda madrugada de quinta para sexta-feira ela se transformava em Mula-sem-cabeça. Ela percorria sete povoados e quem a encontrasse pelo caminho seria atacado, e teria seus olhos, unhas e dedos comidos. Algumas pessoas que já a viram dizem que ao encontrá-la você deve deitar no chão, esconder unhas e dentes para que ela não o ataque. Também dizem que ela também pode querer arrancar a SUA cabeça.
Daniel: Lembra que a vovó também dizia que nas noites em que ela aparece é possível se escutar seus relinchos e seu galope, que parece um cavalo enfurecido?
Sofia: (haha) Lembro sim. Acho que a vovó nos contava essas histórias para que nós ficássemos com medo e a abraçássemos.
(risos)
Daniel: Uhum, provavelmente!
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Daniel: E a lenda da mula sem cabeça, você lembra?
Braden: And the legend of the headless mule, do you remember it?
Sofia: Claro, essa foi a vovó quem nos contou, lembra?
Braden: Of course, Grandma was the one who told us that one, remember?
Daniel: (hesitante) hum.. não muito bem. Como era mesmo que a vovó contava?
Braden: (hesitant) Uhh... Not very well. How did she tell it exactly?
Sofia: Era uma vez uma mulher que foi amaldiçoada por ter namorado um padre. Desde então, toda madrugada de quinta para sexta-feira ela se transformava em Mula-sem-cabeça. Ela percorria sete povoados e quem a encontrasse pelo caminho seria atacado, e teria seus olhos, unhas e dedos comidos. Algumas pessoas que já a viram dizem que ao encontrá-la você deve deitar no chão, esconder unhas e dentes para que ela não o ataque. Também dizem que ela também pode querer arrancar a SUA cabeça.
Braden: A long time ago, a woman was cursed for loving a Catholic Father. Since then, every night from Thursday to Friday she's transformed into the headless mule.
Daniel: Lembra que a vovó também dizia que nas noites em que ela aparece é possível se escutar seus relinchos e seu galope, que parece um cavalo enfurecido?
BradenShe wandered seven villages and whoever encountered her by the way would be attacked, their eyes would be taken, their finger and toe nails and fingers and toes would be eaten.
Sofia: (haha) Lembro sim. Acho que a vovó nos contava essas histórias para que nós ficássemos com medo e a abraçássemos.
BradenSome people that have seen her say that if you encounter her you must lie down on the ground, hide your fingers, toes, and your teeth so she doesn't attack. They also say that she could rip off your head.
(risos)
Braden: Remember that Grandma also said that on the nights that she appears it's possible to hear her neighing and her gallop, that sound like a furious horse?
Daniel: Uhum, provavelmente!
Braden: (haha) I do remember that. I think that Grandma told us these stories so that we would be afraid and hug her.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Peter always does a little review about the previous lessons. explain what you are thinking about the storyline in the lesson, so the students can follow and participate - don't make them guess.
Braden: Man that’s dark.
Thássia: Yes, it was.
Braden: I’m sorry for putting you through that but this is a very deep part of Brazilian culture that everyone knows. and then there’s that phrase.Quem chegar por ultimo é mulher do padre.
Thássia: Right it translates to to “the last one is the priest’s wife.” But it feels like “the last one in is a rotten egg.”
Braden: This phrase wasn’t actually used in the dialogue but it’s use and meaning are explained by the dialouge.
Thássia: You won’t hear many people talking about the headless mule in the streets or even in offices, but you’ll hear kids and parents saying it all the time. The story of the headless mule is why.
VOCAB LIST
Braden: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Sílvia: mula [natural native speed]
Braden: mule
Sílvia: mula [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílvia: mula [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílvia: cabeça [natural native speed]
Braden: head
Sílvia: cabeça [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílvia: cabeça [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílvia: dentes [natural native speed]
Braden: teeth
Sílvia: dentes [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílvia: dentes [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílvia: padre [natural native speed]
Braden: catholic father, priest
Sílvia: padre [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílvia: padre [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílvia: unha [natural native speed]
Braden: nails of the fingers and toes
Sílvia: unha [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílvia: unha [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílvia: relincho [natural native speed]
Braden: neigh, whinny
Sílvia: relincho [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílvia: relincho [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílvia: galope [natural native speed]
Braden: gallop, canter
Sílvia: galope [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílvia: galope [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílvia: arrancar [natural native speed]
Braden: to rip off, to remove forcefully
Sílvia: arrancar [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílvia: arrancar [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílvia: deitar [natural native speed]
Braden: to lie, to lay down
Sílvia: deitar [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílvia: deitar [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílvia: amaldicoar [natural native speed]
Braden: to curse
Sílvia: amaldicoar [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílvia: amaldicoar [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Thássia: The first word we’ll look at is “percorria.” Percorria is the past of the verb percorrer. Percorrer doesn’t have a real direct translation but it is used like “to go through” or “to cover” in a sense of walking, sprinting, driving or going through in general.
Braden: This word has a very old sound to it and one of my dictionaries didn’t even have it listed as a word but most Brazilians understand it, even if they don’t use it.
Thássia: Next we’ll look at vovó and vovô. Vovó means and works the same as “grandma” and vovô works and means the same as “grandpa.” Vovó and vovô are not words used exclusively by kids, adults also say vovó and vovô when referring to their own grandparents.
Braden: It is important to notice the difference in pronunciation and produce it correctly. That way you don’t cause any misunderstandings. Vovó pronounced with open “o” means “grandma” and vovô pronunced with closed “o” means “grandpa.”

Lesson focus

Braden: The focus of this lesson is the position of direct object prounouns.
Thássia: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase “Algumas pessoas que já viram dizem que ao encontrá-la você deve deitar no chão.”
Braden: Which we translated as "Some people that have seen her say that if you encounter her you must lie down on the ground." Here the -la in encontrá-la is an example of a direct object pronoun.
Thássia: Direct object pronouns usually come before a conjugated verb. They can also follow certain verb forms. The following rules will help you to correctly place the direct object pronouns.
Braden: As a general rule the direct object pronoun will precede the verb in the spoken language with this one exception.
Thássia: now listen to this carefully because I’m about to tell you a lot more information than it seems. When the pronouns o, a, os, and as are used with verbs ending in r, s, or z, the r, s, or z will be dropped*, a hyphen takes its place and the pronouns will become -lo, -los, -la, -las respectively.
Braden: Like in the sentences Nós o queremos fazer. or Nós queremos fazê-lo.
Thássia: Yes. Also, when an -ar verb drops the -r, the final a takes an acute accent; á (e.g. comprá-ló). When an -er drops the -r, the final e takes a circumflex accent; ê (e.g. fazê-la). When an -ir verb drops the -r, the final i takes no accent (e.g. cumpri-las).
Braden: This really is something you should look at so here’s another pitch for going to the site and downloading the PDF. Leave a comment while you are there.
Thássia: So, here are some sample sentences. Eu vou ajudar a médica. – “I will help the doctor.” This is with the noun as the direct object. if you were to say “I will help her.” using the pronoun, it becomes “Eu vou ajudá-la.”
Braden: another example of the noun as the direct object would be Ele não vai usar este terno no domingo. – “He won’t use this suit on Sunday.” - if you said Ele não vai usá-lo no domingo. – “He doesn’t use it on Sunday.” then you’d be using the pronoun as the direct object.
Thássia: You’ll remember from every personal introduction you’ve ever given the phrase Prazer em conhecê-lo. – “Nice to meet you.” the conhecê-lo is this direct object rule in action.
Braden: We should point out that In casual Portuguese, this isn’t used very often but on the job certainly in almost any type of writing, it is expected that you know how to do this.
Thássia: Yes it is the correct way to use direct object pronouns.

9 Comments

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Sorry, please keep your comment under 800 characters. Got a complicated question? Try asking your teacher using My Teacher Messenger.

PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
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Tell us your country's folklore story!

PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Friday at 5:33 am
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Oi Darren,


This is a Brazilian Portuguese series.

Are you looking for European Portuguese? We have a few series too!


Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Darren
Friday at 3:42 pm
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Was wondering if this was Brazilian or Continental Portuguese that we are learning?

PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Thursday at 8:36 pm
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Oi Andre,


"Madrugada" is the period between midnight and sunrise.


I hope it helps!

Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101.com

ANDRE
Thursday at 8:32 am
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"toda madrugada de quinta para sexta-feira ela

se transformava em Mula-sem-cabeça."

"every night from Thursday to Friday she's transformed

into the headless mule"

Desculpa, mas a palavra "madrugada " significa manhã cedo, nenhuma noite , não?


Obrigado para lições, gostou de elas muito !

PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Wednesday at 5:38 am
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Oi Jonathan,


That's right. You're just missing the accent here: Nós amamo-lo muito.


We appreciate the feedback and we'll work to improve our materials.

I just wanted to point out that this forms are not used in Brazilian Portuguese conversations. It's mostly used in official and formal writing.


So, for example, it's more common to say:

"Nós o amamos muito." or "Nós amamos muito ele." instead of "Nós amamo-lo muito."


I hope it helps!

Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Jonathan
Tuesday at 11:33 am
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I had the same questions as Bob.


So for your response, would the sentences be as follows?

Nos amamo-lo muito.

Eu fi-lo comprar o livro.


I agree that it would be helpful if the PDF had examples other than infinitives.

PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Friday at 5:48 pm
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Hi Bob,


We usually use it with infinitive verbs, but you might need to use it with verbs ending in "s" or "z". Here are some examples:


Quero conhecer + o. Quero conhecê-lo.

Amamos + o muito. Amamo-lo muito.

Fiz + o comprar o livro. Fi-lo comprar o livro.


I hope it helps! Let us know if you have any other questions!

Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101

Bob
Saturday at 1:46 pm
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Eu não entendo completamente esta lição. :sad:

Does the pronoun always follow the verb if it is in the infinitive form? The rule says that if the verb ends in "r", then the rule applies (which is the case with an infinitive). But it also says that if the verb ends in "s" or "z", the rule applies. Can you please give me an example of this? (The only time I have seen the rule applied is when using an infinitive.)

Obrigado.