Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

DIALOGUE
Jake: Wow. Dois dias relaxando nas melhores praias do Brasil. Que bênção essa Ipanema, né?
Sara: Só queria que a nossa família estivesse aqui.
Jake: (sarcástico) Oh, com certeza. Bebês chorando durante o voo de dez horas de Atlanta para o Rio. Que beleza.
Sara: Haha! Mas estou falando sério. Talvez possamos organizar uma viagem familiar! Convidar nossos pais e os primos e tios. Minha avó iria amar esse lugar. Você lembra que ela foi criada na praia, né?
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Jake: Wow. Dois dias relaxando nas melhores praias do Brasil. Que bênção essa Ipanema, né?
Sara: Só queria que a nossa família estivesse aqui.
Jake: (sarcástico) Oh, com certeza. Bebês chorando durante o voo de dez horas de Atlanta para o Rio. Que beleza.
Sara: Haha! Mas estou falando sério. Talvez possamos organizar uma viagem familiar! Convidar nossos pais e os primos e tios. Minha avó iria amar esse lugar. Você lembra que ela foi criada na praia, né?
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Jake: Wow. Dois dias relaxando nas melhores praias do Brasil. Que bênção essa Ipanema, né?
Braden: Wow. Two days relaxing on the best beaches in Brazil. This Ipanema beach is a blessing!
Sara: Só queria que a nossa família estivesse aqui.
Braden: I just wish our family were here.
Jake: (sarcástico) Oh, com certeza. Bebês chorando durante o voo de dez horas de Atlanta para o Rio. Que beleza.
Braden: (sarcastic) Oh for sure. Babies crying the entire 10 hour flight from Atlanta to Rio. Sounds great!
Sara: Haha! Mas estou falando sério. Talvez possamos organizar uma viagem familiar! Convidar nossos pais e os primos e tios. Minha avó iria amar esse lugar. Você lembra que ela foi criada na praia, né?
Braden: Haha! But I'm being serious. Maybe we can organize a family trip! We could invite our parents, the cousins, and aunts and uncles. My grandmother would love this place. You remember that she grew up on the beach, right?
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Braden: So, we wanted to talk a little bit about Ipanema
Sandra-: Ipanema is a rich neighborhood located in the South zone of Rio de Janeiro and can be found in between Copacabana and Leblon, two other very famous neighborhoods in Rio.
Braden: Ipanema is also not a Portuguese word it comes from the local language Tupi a means "nasty water" or "a river without fish." Not a great name if you ask me. But this was done because the person who started the Ipanema neighborhood owned an area in São Paulo that didn't have any fish.
Sandra-: So the name Ipanema was given in honor of where this man, named José Antônio Moreira Filho, came from.
Braden: The average monthly income in the the Ipanema neighborhood is 80,000 reals per month, based on the census of 2010.
Sandra-: As you can imagine the apartments are luxurious new lodges and boutiques are extremely expensive, and it has one of the highest quality hotel sectors in the country.
Braden: It is often referred to as the neighborhood with the most expensive square foot in Latin America.
Sandra-: Is based on the beach of the Ipanema neighborhood that Tom Jobim wrote "Garota de Ipanema" or girl from Ipanema."
Braden: Let's take a look at the vocabulary.
VOCAB LIST
Braden: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Sandra: relaxando [natural native speed]
Braden: relaxing
Sandra: relaxando [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: relaxando [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: bênção [natural native speed]
Braden: blessing
Sandra: bênção [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: bênção [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: família [natural native speed]
Braden: family
Sandra: família [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: família [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: primo [natural native speed]
Braden: cousin
Sandra: primo [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: primo [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: prima [natural native speed]
Braden: cousin (female)
Sandra: prima [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: prima [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: tia [natural native speed]
Braden: aunt
Sandra: tia [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: tia [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: tio [natural native speed]
Braden: uncle
Sandra: tio [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: tio [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: bebê [natural native speed]
Braden: baby
Sandra: bebê [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: bebê [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: avó [natural native speed]
Braden: grandmother
Sandra: avó [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: avó [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: familiar [natural native speed]
Braden: familiar, dealing with family
Sandra: familiar [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: familiar [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: viagem [natural native speed]
Braden: trip
Sandra: viagem [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: viagem [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: lugar [natural native speed]
Braden: place
Sandra: lugar [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: lugar [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: lembra [natural native speed]
Braden: he/she/it remembers
Sandra: lembra [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: lembra [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: ipanema [natural native speed]
Braden: Ipanema
Sandra: ipanema [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: ipanema [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Braden: Let's take a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Sandra-: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase Que bênção
Braden: The literal translation is ”what a blessing”
Sandra-: but this is a Brazilian expression that very closely corresponds to the English idiom, “thank goodness.”
Braden: Could you break this down?
Sandra-: (break down)
Braden: So what's our next phrase/word?
Sandra-: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase foi criada
Braden: The literal translation is “was created”
Sandra-: but it means “was raised” in the sense of where she grew up as a child.
Braden: Could you break this down?
Sandra-: (break down)
Braden: So what's our next phrase/word?
Sandra-: In the dialogue, we heard the word pro
Braden: This technically isn’t a word in Portuguese. it’s a contraction of the words para and o.
Sandra-: this is not something you would typically see in writing, But that is very common speech. For example, Vamos pro parque? - “Let’s go to the park?”
Braden: Could you break this down?
Sandra-: (break down)
Braden: Let's take a look at the grammar point.

Lesson focus

Braden: So Sandra-, what's the focus of this lesson?
Sandra-: The focus of this lesson is talking about family relationships
Braden: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase
Sandra-: Convidar nossos pais e os primos e tios.
Braden: Which we translated as "We could invite our parents, the cousins, and aunts and uncles."
Sandra-: Immediate family relationships
Braden: Brazilians have close family relationships so as you progress along in your conversation they will ask you about your family and will expect you to ask about theirs.Let's look at the words for the members of your immediate family.
Sandra-: pai(s), mãe(s), irmão(s), irmã(s)
Braden: The word for father is -
Sandra-: pai
Braden: The word for mother is -
Sandra-: mãe
Braden: The word for brother is -
Sandra-: irmão
Braden: The word for sister is -
Sandra-: irmã
Sandra-: Brazilian society is traditionally male dominated and this tendency is evidenced in the language by grouping. for example, pai means “father” and mãe means “mother” but how do you say parents?
Sandra-: The word for parents in Portuguese is -
Braden: pais This is the word for “father” in its plural form and Can mean both "fathers" or "fathers and mothers."
Sandra-: The same thing happens when talking about your brothers and sisters. Irmão is the word for "brother" and irmã is the word for “sister.” If you want to say "brothers and sisters," you'd say -
Braden: This can mean both just "brothers" or "brothers and sisters.”
Sandra-: Extended family relationships
Braden: the word for “uncle,” is -
Sandra-: tio
Braden: The word for "aunt," is -
Sandra-: tia
Braden: The word for “grandmother,” is -
Sandra-: avó
Braden: The word for “grandfather,” is -
Sandra-: avô
Braden: The word for “male cousin,” is -
Sandra-: primo
Braden: The word for “female cousin,” is -
Sandra-: prima
Braden: The word for “brother-in-law,” is -
Sandra-: cunhado
Braden: The word for “sister-in-law,” is -
Sandra-: cunhada
Braden: In the same way as the immediate family groupings, these extended family relationships are grouped together according to the male gender.
Sandra-: So, tio means “uncle,” but tios means “aunts and uncles” and primo means “male cousin,” but primos means “cousins” or “cousins of any gender.”
Braden: The one exception is with “grandparents" where they are grouped together according to the female or grandmother. The words for “grandmother” and “grandfather” in Portuguese have extremely similar pronunciation. Let's review those pronunciations -
Sandra-: avó
Braden: Grandmother
Sandra-: avô
Braden: Grandfather
Braden: So the open "o" at the end is the grandmother and the closed “o” at the end is for grand father. And since with "grandparents" the grouping is made according to the grandmother the plural form of "grandmother" is -
Sandra-: avós
Which means grandparents.
Sandra-: Lets review this lesson.
Braden: In Brazil, family relationships are very important.
Sandra-: More important than work relationships and friendships. After religion, family is the single most important relationship in Brazil
Braden: Knowing the correct terms for your various family members, (or future family members) will go along way in making your life much easier.

11 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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What relatives would you bring with you to Ipanema beach?

PortuguesePod101.com
Sunday at 09:16 PM
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Hello Jaimie,


Thank you for your message.


We don't use an article before "Ipanema". Therefore, we'd say: "Eu visitaria Ipanema." (I'd visit Ipanema.).👍


Hope this helps! For more details, please check out our http://www.PortuguesePod101.com/myteacher


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Jaimie
Sunday at 05:41 AM
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Eu visitaria o Ipanema com os meus pais, a minha irmã, o meu marido, e o meu filho.

PortuguesePod101.com
Tuesday at 03:38 PM
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Hi Ernest Baptist,


Thank you for posting.

We usually don't provide the articles along with nouns.

We indicate the gender of the nouns in the Lesson Notes PDF.


Sincerely,

Ofelia

Team PortuguesePod101.com


Ernest Baptist
Friday at 10:13 PM
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Why missing articulation?

Now is a mess especially of the female voices.

Usually completely unclear.

If it continues I stop it

PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 09:15 PM
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Oi Jonathan,


The main religions in Brazil is Catholic (Brazil has the biggest number of Catholics in the world), but many other Christian religions are very strong too.

We have other religions as well, but they are in smaller number.

And religions created in the country, for example, the candomblé is a Brazilian religion created by African descendants.


I hope it helps!

Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Jonathan
Friday at 02:47 PM
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Sandra says that family is the second most important relationship in Brazil next to religion. What are the main religions in Brazil?

PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 10:10 AM
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Oi Carole,


É verdade!

Actually, probably because of both reasons, I think that Japanese-Brazilian (or Nikkei) use "né" more often then other Brazilians!


Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Carole
Monday at 02:38 AM
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For a second there, I thought maybe the né was borrowed from Japanese (they say Ne a lot at the end to mean "right?"), but não+é makes sense too :smile:

PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 10:59 AM
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Oi Laderon,


That's exactly what it means: não é? -> né?

For example:

Ela vai vir, né? (She'll come, right?)


There are people that add this little word in all the sentences that are possible!

Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101

Laderon
Monday at 10:13 PM
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what does né means in here? Is it some kind of contaction of não é, não tá?