Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

DIALOGUE
Mariana: Então, para chegar no Pão de Açúcar eu tenho de andar no bondinho?
Melissa: Com certeza. Dá para chegar até a ilha de barco né, mas aí tem que escalar a pedra pra ter a vista de tudo. Você não quer perder aquilo não.
Mariana: Mas eu tenho medo de altura.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Mariana: Então, para chegar no Pão de Açúcar eu tenho de andar no bondinho?
Melissa: Com certeza. Dá para chegar até a ilha de barco né, mas aí tem que escalar a pedra pra ter a vista de tudo. Você não quer perder aquilo não.
Mariana: Mas eu tenho medo de altura.
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Mariana: Então, para chegar no Pão de Açúcar eu tenho de andar no bondinho?
Braden: Then, to get to Sugar Loaf, I have to take the cable car?
Melissa: Com certeza. Dá para chegar até a ilha de barco né, mas aí tem que escalar a pedra pra ter a vista de tudo. Você não quer perder aquilo não.
Braden: Of course. It's also possible to go by boat, but then you'd have to rock climb to the top to get the view of everything. You don't want to miss that.
Mariana: Mas eu tenho medo de altura.
Braden: But I'm afraid of heights.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Braden: So, we wanted to talk a little bit about Pão de Açúcar.
Sandra-: The Pão de Açúcar resume the main tourist locations in Rio de Janeiro. Is an island exactly it's actually a gigantic single rock sticking out of the Guanabara Bay.
Braden: There are quite a few stories about the origin of the name the most common is that it comes from the appearance of sugarcane after it's processed.
Sandra-: Back in the days when the Portuguese still ruled Brazil sugarcane was harvested, process, and then stored in a type of pillar format that looks similar to the rock that juts out of Guanabara Bay.
Braden: The Pão de Açúcar is often seen in postcards, commercials, websites, and even in international blockbusters like James Bond films, the Hulk, and New Moon from the Twilight saga.
Sandra-: Another important aspect of the Pão de Açúcar, or Sugarloaf, is the Bondinho, or "cable car." To the Brazilians the Bondinho is just as iconic as the Pão de Açúcar.
Braden: The Bondinho was inaugurated in 1912 and since then has transported an estimated 31 million passengers. The value of this cable car is that it takes you from the city on to the very top peak of the Pão de Açúcar which gives you a view of the entire Guanabara bay.
Sandra-: It was here that the 007 scene of the movie "Moonraker" took place.
Braden: Let's take a look at the vocabulary. é
VOCAB LIST
Braden: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Sandra: açúcar [natural native speed]
Braden: sugar
Sandra: açúcar [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: açúcar [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: pão [natural native speed]
Braden: bread
Sandra: pão [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: pão [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: bondinho [natural native speed]
Braden: tram
Sandra: bondinho [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: bondinho [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: chegar [natural native speed]
Braden: to arrive
Sandra: chegar [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: chegar [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: barco [natural native speed]
Braden: boat
Sandra: barco [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: barco [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: vista [natural native speed]
Braden: view
Sandra: vista [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: vista [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: tudo [natural native speed]
Braden: everything
Sandra: tudo [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: tudo [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: quer [natural native speed]
Braden: he/she/it wants
Sandra: quer [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: quer [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: perder [natural native speed]
Braden: to lose
Sandra: perder [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: perder [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: aquilo [natural native speed]
Braden: that
Sandra: aquilo [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: aquilo [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: tenho [natural native speed]
Braden: I have
Sandra: tenho [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: tenho [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: medo [natural native speed]
Braden: fear
Sandra: medo [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: medo [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: altura [natural native speed]
Braden: height
Sandra: altura [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: altura [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Braden: Let's take a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Sandra-: In the dialogue, we heard the word então
Braden: The literal translation is “then”
Sandra-: but most of the time “então”is used as a conjunction and doesn’t specify any time frame. For that reason, então can be frequently translated as “so,”
Braden: Could you break this down?
Sandra-: (break down)
Braden: So what's our next phrase/word?
Sandra-: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase tenho de
Braden: The literal translation is “have of”
Sandra-: but it means, “have to.” this is the most correct way to say, “I have to go home.”
Braden: Eu tenho de voltar para casa.
Sandra-: You can also say, Eu tenho que voltar para casa. In reality, most Brazilians will say it this way, but the technically correct structure is tenho de.
Braden:
Braden: Could you break this down?
Sandra-: (break down)
Braden: So what's our next phrase/word?
Sandra-: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase dá para chegar
Braden: The literal translation is “ gives to to arrive”
Sandra-: but it means, “it is possible to arrive.” dá Comes from the verb dar which means “to give.” Dar has many meanings one of which, is to express possibility.
Braden: Dá para chegar às nove horas? - “ Is it possible for you to arrive at 9 o’clock?”
Braden: Could you break this down?
Sandra-: (break down)
Braden: So what's our next phrase/word?
Sandra-: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase medo de altura
Braden: The literal translation is “fear of height”
Sandra-: but this is the Brazilian expression for, “scared of heights.”
Braden: Could you break this down?
Sandra-: (break down)
Braden: Let's take a look at the grammar point.

Lesson focus

Braden: So Sandra-, what's the focus of this lesson?
Sandra-: The focus of this lesson is describing things using adverbs
Braden: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase
Sandra-: Com certeza.
Braden: Which we translated as "Of course."
Sandra-: Adverbs refine the meaning of verbs by saying how, when, or where something is done. For example, John spoke well/a lot/here/excitedly/dreadfully/in class.
Braden: Some adverbs end in "-ly" in English (such as quickly). These correspond to the ones that end in -mente in Portuguese. Others do not (such as well and a lot). Portuguese has both of these kinds of adverbs. First, some adverbs that don't end in -mente.
Sandra-: amanhã
Braden: tomorrow
Sandra-: bem
Braden: well
Sandra-: cedo
Braden: early
Sandra-: tarde
Braden: late
Sandra-: hoje
Braden: today
Sandra-: The -mente adverbs are based on the feminine singular form of adjectives. Some adjectives, of course, have just one form that serves for both genders.
Braden: If the adjective has an accent, it is lost on the adverbs made. For example,
Sandra-: claramente
Braden: clearly
Sandra-: professores falam claramente.
Braden: "Professors speaks clearly."
Sandra-: geralmente
Braden: generally
Sandra-: Brasileiros geralmente vivem na cidade.
Braden: "Brazilians generally live in the city."
Sandra-: inteligentemente
Braden: intelligently
Sandra-: Eles debatem inteligentemente.
Braden: "They discuss intelligently."
Sandra-: perfeitamente
Braden: perfectly
Sandra-: Os portuguese entendem os brasileiros perfeitamente.
Braden: "The Portuguese understand Brazilians perfectly."
Sandra-: simplesmente
Braden: simply
Sandra-: O governador simplesmente não está certo.
Braden: "The governor simply isn't right."
Sandra-: Lets review this lesson.
Braden: Adverbs refine the meaning of verbs by saying how, when, or where something is done.
Sandra-: Some Portuguese adverbs end in -mente, but not all of them.

5 Comments

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PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Would you face your fears to climb up the Pão de Açúcar?

PortuguesePod101.com
Sunday at 09:14 PM
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Olá Jaimie,


Thank you for your comment.


I never visited there, but it must be very beautiful!


Feel free to let us know if you have any questions.


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Jaimie
Sunday at 02:43 AM
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Eu gostaria de conhecer o Pão de Açúcar. Imagino que a vista dele é ótima. Não tenho medo de altura, mas acho que não posso escalar porque não sou forte. Mas eu posso andar no bondinho. Você conhece o Pão de Açúcar? Como é?

PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Sunday at 07:51 PM
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Oi Larry,


To search for a lesson about a specific theme, you can use the search engine at the top right corner of the site.

You can type in English the topic, and under "Grammar" you can find the lessons related to that topic.


I hope it helps!

Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101.com

larry g lillie
Friday at 10:08 AM
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THIS S A GENERAL QUESTON. I CANNOT SEEM TO FIGURE OUT HOW TO GO TO A SPECIFIC GRMMAR EXPLANATION. FOR EXAMPLE, IF I NEED A GRAMMAR EXPLANATION FOR THE IMPERFECT TENSE, WHAT DO I DO TO GO TO THE LESSON THAT COVERS IT . THE GRAMMAR BANK DOES NOT SEEEM TO HELP AT ALL.

LARRY