Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

DIALOGUE
Sara: Que paisagem maravilhosa!
Jake: O mar, as montanhas e as praias com o céu azul. Tá um sonho.
Sara: Valeu a pena vir aqui. Foi muito caro, mas valeu a pena.
Jake: Quarenta dólares por um sanduíche, sessenta dólares por protetor solar, e aí mais cem dolares só para o táxi. Isso não é caro, é roubo.
Sara: Mas tá bonito não tá?
Jake: Tá sim. Nunca vi igual. Ótima decisão vir ao Cristo Redentor.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Sara: Que paisagem maravilhosa!
Jake: O mar, as montanhas e as praias com o céu azul. Tá um sonho.
Sara: Valeu a pena vir aqui. Foi muito caro, mas valeu a pena.
Jake: Quarenta dólares por um sanduíche, sessenta dólares por protetor solar, e aí mais cem dolares só para o táxi. Isso não é caro, é roubo.
Sara: Mas tá bonito não tá?
Jake: Tá sim. Nunca vi igual. Ótima decisão vir ao Cristo Redentor.
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Sara: Que paisagem maravilhosa!
Braden: What a marvelous landscape!
Jake: O mar, as montanhas e as praias com o céu azul. Tá um sonho.
Braden: The sea, the mountains, and the beaches with the blue sky. It's a dream.
Sara: Valeu a pena vir aqui. Foi muito caro, mas valeu a pena.
Braden: It was worth it to come here. It was very expensive, but it was worth it.
Jake: Quarenta dólares por um sanduíche, sessenta dólares por protetor solar, e aí mais cem dolares só para o táxi. Isso não é caro, é roubo.
Braden: Forty dollars for a sandwich, sixty dollars for sun block, and another one-hundred dollars just for the taxi. That's not expensive; it's robbery.
Sara: Mas tá bonito não tá?
Braden: But it is beautiful, isn't it?
Jake: Tá sim. Nunca vi igual. Ótima decisão vir ao Cristo Redentor.
Braden: Yes, it is. I've never seen its equal. It was a great decision to come to the Christ Redeemer.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Braden: So, we wanted to talk a little bit about The Christ Redeemer
Sandra-: O Cristo Redentor or, Christ Redeemer, is located in Rio de Janeiro on top of the Morro do Corcovado, or Corcovado hill. It was inaugurated on October 12, 1931 after about five years in construction.
Braden: It is a symbol of Christianity and one of the most internationally recognized icons of Brazil.
Sandra-: It is roughly 38 m (124 ft) in height, 8 m of which is a rock pedestal with 30m (98 ft) being the actual statue. It is the second largest sculpture of Christ in the world. The largest is located in Poland.
Braden: There are two conflicting stories about the origin and construction of o Cristo Redentor. Evidence for both can be found in reputable Brazilian textbooks, making the controversy even more difficult to resolve.
Sandra-: The first story is that the statue was given to Brazil by the French, similar to how Statue of Liberty came to New York. The second story is that it is 100% Brazilian built with no french involvement.
Braden: As best we can tell, the real story is this -
Sandra-: The physical construction took place in Brazil but the vast majority design, debate, construction of molds, calculations, and modeling were done in France.
Braden: Both Brazilians and Frenchmen were involved in almost every aspect of the process, however most of the technical work was done by the French and French industry.
Sandra-: What took place in Brazil was the pouring of concrete into the French molds and fitting the multi-ton pieces together on top of the Corcovado hill.
Braden: This would be a daunting task even if they had been putting together a lego statue because at 710 m (2330 ft) o Cristo Redentor is surrounded almost completely by cliff edge. Maybe it depends on how you define "construction." No matter how or who built it, it's beautiful.
Sandra-: Maybe. well, the Cristo Redentor is frequently referred to in popular music, poetry, and speeches. The images seen on postcards, on websites, and on bumper stickers.
Braden: On July 7, 2007 the Cristo Redentor was chosen by vote as one of the New seven wonders of the world. However this vote was not authoritative on a world level.
Sandra-: Most recently the Cristo Redentor appeared in the twilight Saga movies and the movie Rio.
VOCAB LIST
Braden: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Sandra: sanduíche [natural native speed]
Braden: sandwich, hamburger
Sandra: sanduíche [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: sanduíche [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: dólar [natural native speed]
Braden: dollar
Sandra: dólar [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: dólar [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: táxi [natural native speed]
Braden: taxi
Sandra: táxi [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: táxi [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: roubo [natural native speed]
Braden: theft
Sandra: roubo [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: roubo [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: mas [natural native speed]
Braden: but
Sandra: mas [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: mas [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: vir [natural native speed]
Braden: to come
Sandra: vir [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: vir [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: pena [natural native speed]
Braden: pain, suffering
Sandra: pena [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: pena [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: Cristo [natural native speed]
Braden: Christ
Sandra: Cristo [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: Cristo [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: redentor [natural native speed]
Braden: Redeemer
Sandra: redentor [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: redentor [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: nunca [natural native speed]
Braden: never
Sandra: nunca [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: nunca [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: igual [natural native speed]
Braden: equal, same
Sandra: igual [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: igual [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: cem [natural native speed]
Braden: one hundred (100)
Sandra: cem [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: cem [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: quarenta [natural native speed]
Braden: forty (40)
Sandra: quarenta [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: quarenta [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: vinte [natural native speed]
Braden: twenty (20)
Sandra: vinte [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: vinte [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Sandra-: In the dialogue, we heard the word Valeu a pena
Braden: The literal translation is “Was worth the pain”
Sandra-: but it means “it was worth it.” as in it was worth the effort, or it was worth the time, or it was worth whatever you put into it.
Braden: Could you break this down?
Sandra-: (break down)
Braden: So what's our next phrase/word?
Sandra-: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase e aí
Braden: The literal translation is “and there where you are”
Sandra-: But the meaning is quite different. The idea here is almost identical to “what’s up?” Or “how ya doing?” it’s not quite as slangy as “What’s up?” But it is quite informal so probably not appropriate to use with your boss, but very normal for parties, friends, classmates, and siblings.
Braden: Could you break this down?
Sandra-: (break down)
Braden: So what's our next phrase/word?
Sandra-: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase protetor solar
Braden: The literal translation is ”solar protector”
Sandra-: but it means “ sunblock.”
Braden: Could you break this down?
Sandra-: (break down)
Braden: Let's take a look at the grammar point.

Lesson focus

Braden: So Sandra-, what's the focus of this lesson?
Sandra-: The focus of this lesson is counting from 20 to 100
Braden: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase
Sandra-: Quarenta dólares por um sanduíche,
Braden: Which we translated as " "40 dollars for a sandwich,"
Sandra-: We learned in lesson 3 that, in English, we say 'twenty-one,' 'twenty-two,' etc. and that in Portuguese, the same process begins with sixteen, except 'and' is inserted between the numbers. For example, 'twenty-one' is 'twenty and one' or vinte e um.
Braden: We form numbers from twenty to ninety-nine by following this pattern. For example, "twenty-three" in Portuguese is vinte, which means "twenty," followed by e, which means "and," and then "three" (três).
Sandra-: So you put it all together and get vinte e três. This literally translates to "twenty and three," but it means "twenty-three." Another example would be cinquenta e dois or “52.”
Braden: Remember that the numbers 1 and 2 are gender sensitive which means they will change if your noun is masculine or feminine. So, it would be
Sandra-: cinquenta e dois prédios
Braden: (52 buildings) Because prédio is masculine. But it would be
Sandra-: cinquenta e duas nuvens
Braden: (52 clouds) Because nuvens is feminine.
Sandra-: So, every time you hit one or two as you count from 20 to 100 you have the same variability.
Braden: Let’s go through the numbers from 20 to 100.
Sandra-: We won’t go through every number, that would take forever,What we will look at the numbers for 20, 30, 40, 50 and so on.
Braden: So to start things off, how you say 20 in Portuguese?
Sandra-: Vinte
Braden: and 30?
Sandra-: trinta
Braden: and 40?
Sandra-: quarenta
Braden: and 50?
Sandra-: cinquenta
Braden: and 60
Sandra-: sessenta
Braden: and seventy?
Sandra-: setenta
Braden: and eighty?
Sandra-: oitenta
Braden: 90?
Sandra-: Noventa
Braden: and last, 100?
Sandra-: cem
Braden: Excellent! Nice job?
Sandra-: Thanks! We have a tip for this lesson right?
Braden: Right. We have one quick tip for you. Which is, when writing numbers, Portuguese uses a period where English use a comma
Sandra-: Conversely, Portuguese uses a comma where English uses a period.
Braden: For example, π in English is 3.1416
Sandra-: but in Brazil it's 3 (comma) 1416. Lets review this lesson.
Braden: Numbers are an important part of life and as such you need to have a firm command of at least the basics.
Sandra-: In this lesson we reviewed the numbers 20 through 100 and covered a couple of the common pitfalls with Portuguese numbers.
Braden: *and all the numbers to this lesson as vocabulary

5 Comments

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PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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E aí? When are you going to visit Cristo Redentor?

PortuguesePod101.com
Sunday at 09:11 PM
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Hi Jaimie,


Thanks for posting!


Please note that in Portuguese we use "Brasil".👍


Before "Foz do Iguaçu" we don't use the article. Therefore, we'd say: "Eu quero conhecer Foz de Iguaçu."


Hope this helps! For more details, please check out our http://www.PortuguesePod101.com/myteacher


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Jaimie
Saturday at 04:49 AM
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Eu não conheço o Cristo Redentor. Eu gostaria de visitar o Brazil, mas eu estou interessada em conhecer o sul do Brazil. Eu quero conhecer o foz do iguacu e Florianópolis. Você conhece?

PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 09:58 AM
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Oi Greg,


"Back" is translated as "de volta" in Portuguese. In this case, "de" is not used as a preposition alone, but as the expression "de volta".

I hope it helps. Let me know if you have any questions!


Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101.com

gregalsch@yahoo.com
Friday at 01:57 AM
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In the sample sentences Is the sentence, " Ele nunca vai me levar de volta ao palacio" I understand that " nunca vai me levar" means,"is never going to take me". But I don't understand the need for de in front of volta. If voltar means to go back why is de, of or from needed ?

Greg