Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

DIALOGUE
Jake: Jiu-jitsu? Jiu-jitsu não é da China?
Sara: Do Japão na verdade, mas esse é o estilo brasileiro.
Jake: Aquele que dança enquanto luta?
Sara: Não, essa é capoeira. Capoeira é mole comparado ao jiu-jitsu.
Jake: Sério?
Sara: Jiu-jitsu brasileiro é um estilo de jiu-jitsu muito duro e difícil de aprender.
Jake: É o melhor estilo do mundo?
Sara: Aí não sei, mas sei que muitos dos campeões mundiais de jiu-jitsu são brasileiros.
Jake: São aqueles caras fortes que sempre ganham?
Sara: São eles mesmo.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Jake: Jiu-jitsu? Jiu-jitsu não é da China?
Sara: Do Japão na verdade, mas esse é o estilo brasileiro.
Jake: Aquele que dança enquanto luta?
Sara: Não, essa é capoeira. Capoeira é mole comparado ao jiu-jitsu.
Jake: Sério?
Sara: Jiu-jitsu brasileiro é um estilo de jiu-jitsu muito duro e difícil de aprender.
Jake: É o melhor estilo do mundo?
Sara: Aí não sei, mas sei que muitos dos campeões mundiais de jiu-jitsu são brasileiros.
Jake: São aqueles caras fortes que sempre ganham?
Sara: São eles mesmo.
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Jake: Jiu-jitsu? Jiu-jitsu não é da China?
Braden: Jiu-jitsu? Isn't Jiu-jitsu from China?
Sara: Do Japão na verdade, mas esse é o estilo brasileiro.
Braden: It's from Japan actually, but this is the Brazilian style.
Jake: Aquele que dança enquanto luta?
Braden: The one that dances while you fight?
Sara: Não, essa é capoeira. Capoeira é mole comparado ao jiu-jitsu.
Braden: No, that's capoeira. Capoeira is weak compared to Jiu-jitsu.
Jake: Sério?
Braden: Really?
Sara: Jiu-jitsu brasileiro é um estilo de jiu-jitsu muito duro e difícil de aprender.
Braden: Brazilian Jiu-jitsu is a style of Jiu-jitsu that is hard and difficult to learn.
Jake: É o melhor estilo do mundo?
Braden: Is it the best style in the world?
Sara: Aí não sei, mas sei que muitos dos campeões mundiais de jiu-jitsu são brasileiros.
Braden: That I don't know, but I know that many of the Jiu-jitsu world champions are Brazilian.
Jake: São aqueles caras fortes que sempre ganham?
Braden: Are they those strong guys who always win?
Sara: São eles mesmo.
Braden: Yes, that's them.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Braden: So, we wanted to talk a little bit about Jujitsu
Sandra-: Jujitsu is a Japanese martial art closely related to judo but different in several key points.
Braden: The details of those key points you'll have to ask to a martial arts instructor because it is outside the scope of this lesson.
Sandra-: Basically jujitsu maximizes force. Typically by using the individuals momentum and force and positioning as well as the momentum and positioning of the opponent to create leveraging and movement in order to win the match.
Braden: The best jujitsu fighters are fast, strong, and fluid.
Sandra-: In the early 1900s jujitsu came to Brazil and was taught to a man by the name of Carlos Gracie who in turn taught it to his siblings.
Braden: Based on their perspective and experience in Brazil and with Brazilian culture, Carlos Gracie and Hélio Gracie developed what is currently called Brazilian jujitsu or sometimes Gracie jujitsu.
Sandra-: Watching professional Brazilian jujitsu fighters reminds me of Brazil. The smoothness and fluid-ness that involves the entire body stands out in sharp contrast to the jerky and harsh punches and kicks seen in the many other martial art disciplines.
Braden: Let's take a look at the vocabulary.
VOCAB LIST
Braden: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Sandra: jiu-jitsu [natural native speed]
Braden: Jiu-jitsu
Sandra: jiu-jitsu [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: jiu-jitsu [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: China [natural native speed]
Braden: China
Sandra: China [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: China [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: Japão [natural native speed]
Braden: Japan
Sandra: Japão [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: Japão [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: estilo [natural native speed]
Braden: style
Sandra: estilo [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: estilo [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: dança [natural native speed]
Braden: dance
Sandra: dança [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: dança [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: capoeira [natural native speed]
Braden: Brazilian martial art
Sandra: capoeira [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: capoeira [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: campeões [natural native speed]
Braden: champions
Sandra: campeões [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: campeões [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: mundiais [natural native speed]
Braden: world
Sandra: mundiais [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: mundiais [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: frequentemente [natural native speed]
Braden: often
Sandra: frequentemente [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: frequentemente [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: luta [natural native speed]
Braden: wrestle
Sandra: luta [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: luta [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: enquanto [natural native speed]
Braden: while
Sandra: enquanto [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: enquanto [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: verdade [natural native speed]
Braden: truth
Sandra: verdade [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: verdade [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: duro [natural native speed]
Braden: hard, difficult
Sandra: duro [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: duro [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: difícil [natural native speed]
Braden: difficult
Sandra: difícil [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: difícil [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: aprender [natural native speed]
Braden: to learn
Sandra: aprender [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: aprender [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: sério [natural native speed]
Braden: serious, seriously?
Sandra: sério [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: sério [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Braden: Let's take a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Sandra-: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase na verdade
Braden: The literal translation is “in the truth” which doesn’t make a lot of sense in English but it’s used just like “actually."
Sandra-: For example, some one could say something like, Napoleão nasceu em 600 a. C.
Braden: Which translates to “Napolean was born in 600 B.C. This is factually incorrect wrong so you could gently respond with,
Sandra-: "Na verdade, Napoleão nasceu em 1769."
Braden: Which translates to, “Actually, Napolean was born in 1769. Could you break this down?
Sandra-: (break down)
Braden: So what's our next phrase?
Sandra-: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase não é
Braden: The literal translation is “not is” but it means and is used just like “is not” or “isn’t.”
Sandra-: Notice how the word order is reversed. “not is” instead of “isn’t.” For example, Ele não é alto.
Braden: Translates to “He isn’t tall.” Could you break this down?
Sandra-: (break down)
Braden: So what's our last word?
Sandra-: In the dialogue, we heard the word mole
Braden: The literal translation is "soft" but here it means something closer to “easy” or “weak.”
Sandra-: For example, “Ele é mole.” would translate to “He is soft.”
Braden: Now, it’s actually kind of rude to say this but if you were to say it would convey the idea of an unstable person or someone you couldn’t trust.
Sandra-: Not necessarily a bad person but, just like jello, as soon as you put on pressure, he'd fall apart.
Braden: So, “soft” is one of the better translations but, as you can see, the mental image is something closer to “jello” than “a teddy bear.”
Sandra-: I don’t think I’d ever describe a teddy bear as mole, unless it were made of jello, or rubber or something like that. To describe a teddy bear we’d use the word “macio.”
Braden: Could you break this down?
Sandra-: (break down)
Braden: Let's take a look at the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Braden: So Sandra-, what's the focus of this lesson?
Sandra-: The focus of this lesson is talking about abstract physical characteristics
Braden: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase
Sandra-: São aqueles caras fortes que sempre ganham?
Braden: Which we translated as "Are they those strong guys who always win?"
Sandra-: In this lesson, we're talking about adjectives that describe more abstract concepts, such as strong and weak, difficult and easy, and hard and soft.
Braden: In the dialogue about Brazilian Jujitsu, both Sarah and Jake use several words in figurative or abstract ways. Some of the words they use are -
Sandra-: mole
Braden: "jello-y"
Sandra-: duro
Braden: “hard”. To describe the Brazilian jujitsu fighters, they use the words -
Sandra-: fortes
Braden: “strong”
Sandra-: o melhor
Braden: "the best"* These are all adjectives. Actually, O melhor is technically a superlative. But within the context of this lesson, it acts almost identically to an adjective. Adjectives are words that modify or alter the base meaning of a noun.
Sandra-: In a previous lesson, we talked about adjectives that describe simple physical characteristics. For example, tall, short, fat, skinny, etc. In Portuguese as well as English, adjectives can also be used to describe things in more figurative, abstract, or colorful ways.
Braden: For example, Sara used the word duro to describe Brazilian jujitsu. Duro means “hard” as in “Rocks are hard.” but Portuguese also can use the word duro in an abstract sense to mean that something is difficult, as in “Rocks are hard to chew.”
Sandra-: Remember that in English the adjective comes before the noun. But in Portuguese the adjective comes after the noun.
Braden: Let's look at some more abstract adjectives -
Sandra-: forte
Braden: strong
Sandra-: difícil
Braden: difficult
Sandra-: duro
Braden: hard
Sandra-: mole
Braden: jello-y
Sandra-: o melhor
Braden: the best. In the dialog, we heard the phrase,
Sandra-: Capoeira é mole comparado ao ju-jitsu.
Braden: "Capoeira is weak compared to Ju-jitsu."
Sandra-: Ju-jitsu brasileiro é um estilo de ju-jitsu muito duro e difícil de aprender.
Braden: "Brazilian ju-jitsu is a style of ju-jitsu that is hard and difficult to learn."
Sandra-: São aqueles caras fortes que sempre ganham?
Braden: "Are they those strong guys who always win?" Could you give is a few phrases that are not from the dialog?
Sandra-: Sure. O lutador é forte.
Braden: "The fighter is strong."
Sandra-: A tarefa está fácil.
Braden: “The task is easy.”
Sandra-: A gelatina é mole.
Braden: “Gelatin is soft.”
Sandra-: O melhor é o Augustinho.
Braden: "The best one is Augustinho."
Sandra-: Lets review this lesson.
Braden: Using adjectives to describe abstract concepts is an extremely important ability because it's something we do all the time.
Sandra-: Using adjectives in this way not only makes your conversation more interesting but helps you express yourself more confidently.
Braden: And by knowing, for example, that the word duro has both the literal meaning of being “hard” and the abstract meaning of “difficult”, you can explain things more naturally.

11 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Você prefere aprender jiu-jutsu estilo brasileiro ou capoeira?

Do you prefer to learn Brazilian-style Jujitsu or capoeira?

PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Friday at 07:02 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi, Basant!


thank you for the feedback! We'll fix as soon as possible.


Sincerely

Marcia

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Basant
Thursday at 04:06 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

HI,

In the vocabulary section above, against the word " CHINA", the voiceover says "Jiu-Jitsu."

Please check this and make the correction.

Obrigado.

PortuguesePod101.com
Friday at 02:16 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Olá Jaimie,


Exercise is always great for health, regardless of the sport you practice. 👍


In case of any questions, please don't hesitate to contact us.


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Jaimie
Tuesday at 11:50 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Eu gostaria de aprender ambos mas não para lutar só para ser mais forte.

PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 07:48 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Olá Luis,


Obrigada por sua mensagem.


The most common word is Jiu-Jitsu. You can also check out the official website of the sport in Brazil:

http://cbjj.com.br/


The Jiu-Jitsu Fighters are formal athletes, as acknowledged by the CBJJ :wink:


If you have any doubts, please let us know.


Cristiane

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Luis D Silva
Tuesday at 12:47 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Oi Carole! Prazer!


Eu treino JiuJitsu. A forma mais comum e JiuJitsu ou Jiu-Jitsu. A pessoa que treina JiuJitsu e um jiujeteiro. Muitas pessoas tambem usan a palavra BJJ quando eles estao falando a cerca de JiuJitsu.

PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 11:59 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Oi Carole,


Because "Jiu-jitsu" is a foreign word, sometimes more than one writing style is accepted.

In Portuguese, these 3 forms are used: jiu-jitsu, jujitsu or jujutsu.

But the first one, jiu-jitsu, is the most common way.


I've changed all examples to "jiu-jitsu", so it's less confusing. Thanks for letting us know!

Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Carole
Saturday at 11:13 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

:sweat_smile: Jujitsu is written 3 different ways in portuguese in the pdf


dialog: "Jiu-jitsu? Jiu-jitsu não é da China?"

vocabulary: jiujitsu jujitsu noun masculine

sample sentence: Ele é um lutador de jujitsu.


Jiu-jitsu, jiujitsu , jujitsu


Which is it? (or are they all correct?)

PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Saturday at 09:36 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Oi Makiko!


Oh, peço desculpas por isso. Espero que ele não fique ofendido.

Eu acho a capoeira uma arte marcial muito bonita, quase que um mistura de dança e luta, embora nunca tenha tentado.


Espero tentar algum dia, e quem sabe praticar um pouco também.

Ouvi falar que existem diferenças entre as capoeiras também, não é?


Você pratica que tipo de capoeira?


Até mais,

Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101

Makiko
Friday at 04:11 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Eu apprendo capoeira. Não sei que como é o Brazilian Jiu-jitsu.

Eu acho que os movimentos de capoeira são únicos e graciosos. Alguns são mais acrobático.


Se o meu mestre ouvir o que foi dito sobre Capoeira nesta lição, ele vai ser ofendido.


obrigada,

Makiko