Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

DIALOGUE
Jake: Sabe, faz dias que estou tentando comprar ingressos para as Olimpíadas mas não consigo achar sites legítimos.
Sara: Bem, você foi para o site oficial das Olimpíadas no Rio?
Jake: Nem consigo achar! Você sabe onde é?
Sara: Acho que é www.olimpiadasrio.com.br.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Jake: Sabe, faz dias que estou tentando comprar ingressos para as Olimpíadas mas não consigo achar sites legítimos.
Sara: Bem, você foi para o site oficial das Olimpíadas no Rio?
Jake: Nem consigo achar! Você sabe onde é?
Sara: Acho que é www.olimpiadasrio.com.br.
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Jake: Sabe, faz dias que estou tentando comprar ingressos para as Olimpíadas mas não consigo achar sites legítimos.
Braden: You know, I've been trying for days to buy tickets for the Olympics, but I can't find legitimate sites.
Sara: Bem, você foi para o site oficial das Olimpíadas no Rio?
Braden: Well, did you go to the official Rio Olympic site?
Jake: Nem consigo achar! Você sabe onde é?
Braden: I can't even find that! Do you know where it is?
Sara: Acho que é www.olimpiadasrio.com.br.
Braden: I think it's www.olimpiadasrio.com.br.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Braden: So, we wanted to talk a little bit about Olimpíadas
Sandra-: The Olympics (or Olimpíadas in Portuguese) have their origin in ancient Greece.
Braden: What takes place today however is very different from the original games that took place in Athens.
Sandra-: In August of 2016, Rio de Janeiro will host the Summer Olympics. This'll be the first time the Olympic Games will be hosted in South America.
Braden: The opening and closing ceremonies are planned to take place in the Maracanã stadium.
Sandra-: Most of the events will happen in the Barra da Tijuca region.
Braden: Starting with the Summer Olympics, rugby and golf will be included totaling 28 sports on the program.
Sandra-: Let's take a look at the vocabulary.
VOCAB LIST
Braden: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Sandra: sabe [natural native speed]
Braden: he/she/it knows
Sandra: sabe [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: sabe [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: dias [natural native speed]
Braden: days
Sandra: dias [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: dias [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: comprar [natural native speed]
Braden: to buy
Sandra: comprar [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: comprar [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: ingressos [natural native speed]
Braden: tickets
Sandra: ingressos [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: ingressos [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: olimpíadas [natural native speed]
Braden: Olympics
Sandra: olimpíadas [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: olimpíadas [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: sites [natural native speed]
Braden: websites
Sandra: sites [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: sites [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: legítimos [natural native speed]
Braden: legitimate
Sandra: legítimos [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: legítimos [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: oficial [natural native speed]
Braden: official
Sandra: oficial [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: oficial [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: consigo [natural native speed]
Braden: I am able to
Sandra: consigo [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: consigo [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: achar [natural native speed]
Braden: to find
Sandra: achar [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: achar [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: onde [natural native speed]
Braden: where
Sandra: onde [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: onde [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: nem [natural native speed]
Braden: nor, the opposite of or
Sandra: nem [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: nem [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: bem [natural native speed]
Braden: well
Sandra: bem [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: bem [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: você [natural native speed]
Braden: you
Sandra: você [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: você [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Sandra-: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase nem consigo achar
Braden: The literal translation is “No able to find”
Sandra-: But it means, “I can’t even find it.” Sometimes this phrase is shortened to just “nem consigo,” to mean “I can’t even (do it).”
Braden: In the dialog, Sarah asked Jake
Sandra-: Você foi para o site oficial das olimpíadas no Rio? which translates to, “Well, did you go to the official Rio olympic site?
Braden: to which Jake responded, “Nem consigo achar!” which translates to, “ I can’t even find.”
Braden: Could you break this down?
Sandra-: (break down)
Braden: So what's our next phrase?
Sandra-: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase faz dias
Braden: The literal translation is “makes days” but it means, “It has been days”
Sandra-: This phrase is a variation on the phrase, “faz tempo” which we learned in lesson 21.
Baden: You could also easily exchange the word dias for almost any time period. For example, if it’s been several years since you’ve visited a particular place, you could say
Sandra-: Faz anos que não venho aqui.
Braden: which translates to, “It’s been years since I’ve come here.” Or if you’ve been waiting for someone for a long time, something that happens a lot in Brazil, you could say
Sandra-: Faz horas que estou te esperando.”
Braden: Which translates to, “It’s been hours that I’ve been waiting for you.” Or in more normal English, “I’ve been waiting for you for hours.”
Braden: Could you break this down?
Sandra-: (break down)
Braden: Let's move on to the focus of this lesson.

Lesson focus

Braden: So Sandra-, what's the focus of this lesson?
Sandra-: The focus of this lesson is expressing ownership in Portuguese
Braden: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase
Sandra-: Bem você foi para o site oficial das olipmíadas no Rio?
Braden: Which we translated as "Well, did you go to the official Rio olympic site?"
Sandra-: You'll hear and use de every day so start things off we’ll take a look at the pronunciation then move on to the uses of de to show possession.
Braden: Pronunciation
Sandra-: Since de is so frequently used, it has several possible pronunciations depending on the dialect. We could spend an entire series on just this one word but to avoid unnecessary speculation, we'll focus on the three most common pronunciations.
Braden: 1) people from the deep south or Sul of Brazil say de (de). this is probably because of strong Spanish influence as every state in the south of Brazil orders a Spanish-speaking country.
Sandra-: Eu sou de Curitiba.
Braden: "I am from Curitiba." 2) people from the middle of the country say de, as in the G.
Sandra-: Eu sou de Brasília.
Braden: "I'm from Brasília." 3) people from the north and northeast of Brazil say de (di).
Sandra-: Eu sou de Recife.
Braden: "I'm from Recife." Okay so moving on, the preposition de is one of the main grammatical structures for expressing ownership and possession in Portuguese.
Sandra-: Portuguese does not use an apostrophe -s to show possession, as in "John's shoes." The correct way to express this idea is to restructure the sentence and say
Braden "the shoes of John."
Sandra-: "os calçados do João." Let's look at the construction of these phrases with a little bit more detail. The conversion of an English phrase showing possession occurs in two steps.
Braden: First, reword the phrase to follow this pattern
Sandra-: Second, translate each word into Portuguese following this pattern -
Braden: Article*+noun+de+Article*+owner. So, "The house of the man" becomes
Sandra-: "a casa do homem".
Braden: In our example sentence, a contraction occurred. Anytime de is followed by the articles o(s) or a(s) it will form a contraction.
Sandra-: When using de to show ownership, these kinds of contractions will happen frequently because all nouns in Portuguese must be preceded by an article, even if the same does not happen in English. For example,
Braden: "John's mother" becomes “the mother of John” Now translate “the mother of John” to Portuguese to get
Sandra-: "a mãe de o João" or "a mãe do João."
Braden: Notice how John has an article before his name in Portuguese but not in the equivalent phrase in English.
Sandra-: Lets review this lesson.
Braden: Expressing ownership in Portuguese is a daily task. You need to do it when you describe your job, your life, your family, your trip, your hotel, etc.
Sandra-: To do this properly, you need to use the preposition de. De is a very important word in Portuguese. It usually translates to "of" or "from" in English but, when talking about ownership, it usually translates as an apostrophe.
Braden: In this lesson we learned the pronunciation of the preposition de and the structure for expressing ownership using de.

17 Comments

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PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Tente descrever o seu trabalho para nós!

Try describing your job for us!

PortuguesePod101.com
Friday at 2:33 am
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Hello Jaimie,


That's a great experience! :)


We also offer courses in more languages, in case you need too:

Languages We Teach

https://www.portuguesepod101.com/about-us/languages-we-teach/


Should you have any questions, please let us know.


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Jaimie
Tuesday at 5:17 am
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Obrigada Cristiane! Eu conheço pessoas de diferentes países todos os dias. É como viajar pelo mundo sem sair de casa. Eu tenho muitos estudantes brasileiros. Por isso eu estou aprendendo português.

PortuguesePod101.com
Friday at 2:16 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Olá Jaimie,


That's a very interesting job!👍


Feel free to let us know if you have any questions.


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Jaimie
Tuesday at 11:19 pm
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Eu sou professora de ingles. Eu trabalho para uma empresa virtual. Eu ensino aulas particulares e em grupo usando uma sala de aula virtual. Eu gosto muito do meu trabalho.

Portuguesepod101.com  
Monday at 7:50 pm
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Hello Jason,


Thanks for posting.


As you'll need more data about articles, please find below the links for two classes that give more information about them and their usage. In case you have further doubts, please let us know :wink:

https://www.portuguesepod101.com/2011/03/29/absolute-beginner-19-brazilians-striking-problem/

https://www.portuguesepod101.com/2012/06/11/beginner-24-no-dinner-dates-in-brazil/


Cristiane

Team Portuguesepod101.com

Jason
Monday at 9:21 am
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Adding to Larry's comment and Paloma's response regarding the usage of articles before nouns, I have additional questions about when it is appropriate to use them.


In the example Paloma gave (comprar ingressos - buy tickets vs comprar os ingressos - buy the tickets), the difference is more intuitive, since the same rule applies in English.


However, in other less intuitive instances such as "os calçados do João," the equivalent translation would not make sense in English. In English, the naming of the individual replaces the need for an article to identify him. Does the same not hold in Portuguese?


Could you please explain at length the rules for the usage of articles, or refer me to your lesson materials that covers this? Thank you :)

PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Friday at 11:19 pm
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Oi Larry,


All nouns in Portuguese have a gender, feminine or masculine. By adding the article, you define the noun, making it more specific.

For example:

comprar ingressos - buy tickets

comprar os ingressos - buy the tickets


In Portuguese, usually the usage of the article is necessary, but it can be ommited sometimes, or used to change meanings, as in the example above.


I hope it helps. Let me know if you have further questions.

Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101.com

larry g. lilllie
Saturday at 4:33 am
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In this lesson, as well as one other some time ago, it is stated that all nouns in portuguese must be proceeded by an article. However, there are many examples of nouns in many of these lessons in which there is no article before the noun. Could you please clarify. Thank you.

PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 2:52 pm
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Oi Rommel,


Thanks for letting us know the issue! And sorry for the typo :flushed:

We've fixed it already.


Let us know if you have any questions.

Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Rommel
Tuesday at 11:51 am
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Hi Team,


I would like to inform the error I've seen on the PDF file. I've seen the word "orders" instead of the word "borders"