Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

DIALOGUE
Mariana: O que você gosta mais do Rock em Rio?
Sara: Eu gosto mais da música e da festa. Tanta coisa boa aqui. É muito divertido.
Mariana: Seus amigos vieram contigo?
Sara: Não, só eu e minha família.
Mariana: E vocês vieram da onde?
Sara: Viemos de Curitiba!
Mariana: E quantos quilômetros é de lá até aqui?
Sara: Sei lá. Novecentos?
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Mariana: O que você gosta mais do Rock em Rio?
Sara: Eu gosto mais da música e da festa. Tanta coisa boa aqui. É muito divertido.
Mariana: Seus amigos vieram contigo?
Sara: Não, só eu e minha família.
Mariana: E vocês vieram da onde?
Sara: Viemos de Curitiba!
Mariana: E quantos quilômetros é de lá até aqui?
Sara: Sei lá. Novecentos?
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Mariana: O que você gosta mais do Rock em Rio?
Braden: What do you like most about Rock in Rio?
Sara: Eu gosto mais da música e da festa. Tanta coisa boa aqui. É muito divertido.
Braden: I like the music and the party most. So much good stuff here. It's very fun.
Mariana: Seus amigos vieram contigo?
Braden: Did your friends come with you?
Sara: Não, só eu e minha família.
Braden: No, just me and my family.
Mariana: E vocês vieram da onde?
Braden: And where did you come from?
Sara: Viemos de Curitiba!
Braden: We came from Curitiba!
Mariana: E quantos quilômetros é de lá até aqui?
Braden: And how many kilometers is it from there to here?
Sara: Sei lá. Novecentos?
Braden: I have no idea. Nine hundred?
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Braden: So, we wanted to talk a little bit about Rock in Rio
Sandra-: Rock in Rio is a music festival that happens unsurprisingly in Rio de Janeiro. The first time it took place was in 1985 but has since had a total of eight editions in Rio, Lisboa, and Madrid.
Braden: The most recent took place in Rio at the Cidade do Rock (City of Rock) toward the end of September, 2011.
Sandra-: The format is basically a series of concerts over a weeklong period of time from a variety of rock bands, pop singers, and musicians.
Braden: While the focus is obviously rock style music, going from Katy Perry all the way to heavy metal, there have also been presentations of samba and even bossa nova.
Sandra-: In 2012 rock in Rio is planned for a simultaneous event in both Lisboa and Madrid. And in 2013 another rock in Rio will take place in the city of rock in Rio de Janeiro.
Braden: Let's take a look at the vocabulary.
VOCAB LIST
Braden: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Sandra: festa [natural native speed]
Braden: party
Sandra: festa [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: festa [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: música [natural native speed]
Braden: music
Sandra: música [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: música [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: Rock [natural native speed]
Braden: Rock music
Sandra: Rock [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: Rock [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: sobre [natural native speed]
Braden: about
Sandra: sobre [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: sobre [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: gosta de [natural native speed]
Braden: he/she/it likes
Sandra: gosta de [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: gosta de [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: contigo [natural native speed]
Braden: with you
Sandra: contigo [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: contigo [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: amigos [natural native speed]
Braden: friends
Sandra: amigos [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: amigos [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: tanta [natural native speed]
Braden: so much
Sandra: tanta [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: tanta [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: divertido [natural native speed]
Braden: fun
Sandra: divertido [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: divertido [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: família [natural native speed]
Braden: family
Sandra: família [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: família [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: minha [natural native speed]
Braden: my, mine
Sandra: minha [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: minha [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: só [natural native speed]
Braden: just, only
Sandra: só [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: só [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: onde [natural native speed]
Braden: where
Sandra: onde [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: onde [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: Curitiba [natural native speed]
Braden: Curitiba
Sandra: Curitiba [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: Curitiba [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: quilo [natural native speed]
Braden: kilo
Sandra: quilo [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: quilo [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Sandra-: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase Só eu e a minha família
Braden: The literal translation is “just me and the my family”
Sandra-: But it means, “just me and my family.” Portuguese uses the word “the” much more often than English.
Braden: For example, “Eu gosto da Andreia.” as we learned an absolute beginner season 1, “de+a=da” so was literally translates to, “I like the Andrea.” Instead of “I like Andrea.”
Sandra-: In situations like this you can usually just ignore the extra “the.” As we go along in the lessons will learn how to these “extra” articles.
Braden: but for now, don’t feel bad if you just ignore them. Could you break this down?
Sandra-: (break down)
Braden: So what's our next phrase?
Sandra-: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase tanta coisa boa aqui
Braden: The literal translation is “Much thing good here”
Sandra-: but it means “so many good things here.” The grammar here is beyond the scope of this lesson, this is a great and useful phrase you can use often.
Braden: for example, if you’re at a restaurant and looking at a menu you could say, “tanta coisa boa aqui.”
Sandra-: to mean, “so many good things here.” Or ”so much good stuff here.”
Braden: Could you break this down?
Sandra-: (break down)
Braden: Let's move on to the focus of this lesson.

Lesson focus

Braden: So Sandra-, what's the focus of this lesson?
Sandra-: The Focus of This Lesson is Grammatical Gender
Braden: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase
Sandra-: E quantos quilômetros é de lá até aqui?
Braden: Which we translated as "And how many kilometers is it from there to here?"
Sandra-: Now remember that gender is embedded in nouns and then expands to the adjectives and articles.
Braden: So we look and find the noun "quilômetros," which means “kilometers.” "Quilômetros" is a masculine noun which you can identify by the “o” at the end.
Sandra-: Therefore, "Quilómetros" being a masculine noun, "quantos" will also be in its masculine form, with an “o” at the end.
Braden: Another example from the dialogue is
Sandra-: É muito divertido.
Braden: Which retranslated as "It’s very fun."
Sandra-: There is no noun in the sentence which makes us question how could there be gender. This sentence has an implied subject and because of that subject, which is masculine, the the masculine form divertido is used.
Braden: The inferred subject, by the way, is Rock in Rio from the previous line. Moving on, the phrase,
Sandra-: Não, só eu e minha família.
Braden: Was also used in the dialog. We translated this as "No, just me and my family."
Sandra-: Here the feminine noun família is modified by a possessive. Since família is feminine the possessive must also be in its feminine form, minha.
Braden: If you were to say, "meu família" you would have a disagreement in the grammatical gender which, in practice, is extremely painful to Brazilian ears. This is the real reason we talk so much about grammatical gender. As foreigners, grammatical gender is just another grammar rule to memorize.
Sandra-: But when you mess up the grammatical gender, it hurts our ears. Think of some horrific grammar error in your own language and imagine the Brazilians feeling that way every time your noun disagrees with your adjectives.
Braden: So, we talk about it not because we’re grammar snobs, but because getting it right is a small kindness you can perform for the Brazilians.
Sandra-: Yes it is! Lets review this lesson.
Braden: Grammatical gender is one of the foundation principles in Portuguese grammar.
Sandra-: Because of that, it is essential that you learn to make all of the adjectives and articles agree with the gender of the nouns.
Braden: This is the real reason we talk so much about grammatical gender. As foreigners, grammatical gender is just another grammar rule to memorize.
Sandra-: But when you mess up the grammatical gender, it hurts a Brazilian’s ears. Think of some horrific grammar error in your own language an imagine the Brazilians feeling that way every time your noun disagrees with it’s adjectives.
Braden: No were all absolute beginners here so don't be concerned about being 100% perfect right from the get-go. You're going to mess up, you're going to make mistakes, all of us do and the best part is Brazilians are extremely forgiving.
Sandra-: That's right. This isn't something you should stress about but it is something you should be aware of and pay attention to. By listening and paying attention to the grammatical gender you will by default learn it properly.
Braden: But so often foreigners don't know that this grammatical gender is even going on. So we're just pointing it out to make sure that you know and so that you can study and perfect it.
Sandra-: Lets review this lesson.
Braden: Grammatical gender is one of the foundation principles in Portuguese grammar.
Sandra-: Because of that, it is essential that you learn to make all of the adjectives and articles agree with the gender of the nouns.

13 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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What's our favorite song written in Portuguese?

PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Monday at 07:11 PM
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Hi, Fernando Salvador,


Fado is a beautiful kind of Portuguese song. Good choice!


Sincerely

Marcia

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Fernando Salvador
Monday at 12:24 PM
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Eu gosta Fado music

PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 02:14 AM
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Oi Sandra,


So in most parts of Brazil we pronounce it like "dji"

In Parana state (where Curitiba is located) though, they say "dhi"


Both ways are correct and can be understood.


Espero que ajude!

Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Sandra
Friday at 03:39 AM
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Oi!

Why is it that "de" is sometimes pronounced "dhe" and sometimes "dje"?


Viemos de Curitiba is without the j sound, as well as gosto de. But in every other situation I can think of it's "dje".


Muito obrigada,

Sandra

PortuguesePod101.com
Sunday at 08:21 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Jaimie,


Thank you for leaving the comment.


If you have any questions, please let us know.


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Jaimie
Tuesday at 05:44 AM
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Eu gosto da música de Clarice Falcão. Ela tem uma música chamada 'Eu me lembro.' É muito boa.

PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Thursday at 05:34 AM
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Oi Grant,


That's right. "Quantos quilos eu tô (estou)" means literally "How many kilos am I?", or "How much do I weight?"


I hope it helps! Let me know if you have any questions!

Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Grant
Tuesday at 12:16 AM
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in the sample sentences it has 'quanto quilo eu to'. Is the 'to' short for "estou" so it translates like 'how many kilos I have'?

PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Friday at 10:06 AM
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Oi Jonathan,


Thanks again for your comment.

Your concerns were already forwarded to our correspondent team who is working hard to improve our lessons :smile:


Let us know if you have any questions!

Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Jonathan
Wednesday at 12:20 AM
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It would be helpful to have the vocabulary words in the Lesson Notes PDF (which I always use) in the same order as they read them in the audio. It makes it more difficult to follow when they are in a different order, or leave a word out, like "por" in this case.