Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

DIALOGUE
Sara: A senhora vai para Porto Alegre, não é?
Marisa: Não. Eu ia, mas agora eu vou para o Rio.
Sara: Por quê? O que é que aconteceu?
Marisa: Bom, o chefe me telefonou ontem à noite.
Sara: E daí?
Marisa: Eles precisam de alguém lá na seção de vendas.
Sara: Vai ver que eu vou acabar indo para Porto Alegre!
Marisa: Pois é, né. Bem, eu acho que estão chamando o meu voo.
Sara: Ah tá. Tenha um ótimo voo, senhora.
Marisa: Obrigada jovem! Igualmente.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Sara: A senhora vai para Porto Alegre, não é?
Marisa: Não. Eu ia, mas agora eu vou para o Rio.
Sara: Por quê? O que é que aconteceu?
Marisa: Bom, o chefe me telefonou ontem à noite.
Sara: E daí?
Marisa: Eles precisam de alguém lá na seção de vendas.
Sara: Vai ver que eu vou acabar indo para Porto Alegre!
Marisa: Pois é, né. Bem, eu acho que estão chamando o meu voo.
Sara: Ah tá. Tenha um ótimo voo, senhora.
Marisa: Obrigada jovem! Igualmente.
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Sara: A senhora vai para Porto Alegre, não é?
Braden: You're going to Porto Alegre, right ma'am?
Marisa: Não. Eu ia, mas agora eu vou para o Rio.
Braden: No. I was going to, but now I'm going to Rio.
Sara: Por quê? O que é que aconteceu?
Braden: What for? What happened?
Marisa: Bom, o chefe me telefonou ontem à noite.
Braden: Well, the boss called me last night.
Sara: E daí?
Braden: So?
Marisa: Eles precisam de alguém lá na seção de vendas.
Braden: They need someone in sales there.
Sara: Vai ver que eu vou acabar indo para Porto Alegre!
Braden: You'll see that I'll end up going to Porto Alegre!
Marisa: Pois é, né. Bem, eu acho que estão chamando o meu voo.
Braden: That's how it is, isn't it? Well, I think they're announcing my flight.
Sara: Ah tá. Tenha um ótimo voo, senhora.
Braden: Oh, okay! Have a great flight, ma'am!
Marisa: Obrigada jovem! Igualmente.
Braden: Thank you, young woman! You too.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Braden: So, we wanted to talk a little bit about Airports in Rio de Janeiro
Sandra-: Just to avoid any possible confusion, there are two large airports in Rio de Janeiro. There are a couple smaller private airports but they're extremely expensive than normal people don't go there.
Braden: The two main ones are the international airport usually referred to as Galeão (airport code GIG) and the domestic airport Santos Dumont (airport code SDU).
Sandra-: The Santos Dumont airport is mostly for domestic flights spend is typically ranked among the top 15 busiest airports in Brazil.
Braden: Because of the continued interest and economic growth of Rio de Janeiro, more and more airlines are announcing nonstop flights to review including British Airways, US Airways, LAN Airlines, KLM, Delta, Continental, and many others.
Sandra-: Let's take a look at the vocabulary.
VOCAB LIST
Braden: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Sandra: porto alegre [natural native speed]
Braden: Porto Alegre (Joyous Port)
Sandra: porto alegre [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: porto alegre [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: senhora [natural native speed]
Braden: ma'am
Sandra: senhora [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: senhora [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: ontem [natural native speed]
Braden: yesterday
Sandra: ontem [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: ontem [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: chefe [natural native speed]
Braden: boss, chief, head
Sandra: chefe [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: chefe [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: precisam [natural native speed]
Braden: they/y’all need
Sandra: precisam [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: precisam [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: seção [natural native speed]
Braden: section
Sandra: seção [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: seção [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: vendas [natural native speed]
Braden: sales
Sandra: vendas [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: vendas [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: acabar [natural native speed]
Braden: to finish, to end, to run out
Sandra: acabar [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: acabar [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: voo [natural native speed]
Braden: flight
Sandra: voo [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: voo [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: igualmente [natural native speed]
Braden: equally,
Sandra: igualmente [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: igualmente [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: jovem [natural native speed]
Braden: young person
Sandra: jovem [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: jovem [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Braden: Let's take a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Sandra-: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase e daí?
Braden: The literal translation is “and of the where you are”
Sandra-: But it means, “So what?” Hear voice tone is very important. If you do with a conceited manner, this can be rather offensive. Kind of like, “So what do I care?”
Braden: but if you say it in a normal conversational tone, that functions almost the same as “And?”
Braden: Could you break this down?
Sandra-: (break down)
Braden: So what's our next phrase/word?
Sandra-: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase pois é
Braden: The literal translation is “therefore it is”
Sandra-: but in reality this phrase Is just a filler. is usually used whenAn appropriate response might be unnecessary or possibly offensive.
Braden: the kind of like confirmingOr agreeing without actually agreeing with the person. Very noncommittal.
Braden: Could you break this down?
Sandra-: (break down)
Braden: So what's our next phrase/word?
Sandra-: In the dialogue, we heard the word igualmente
Braden: The literal translation is “equally”
Sandra-: but in the dialogue he was used to mean “same to you.”
Braden: Could you break this down?
Sandra-: (break down)
Braden: Let's take a look at the grammar point.

Lesson focus

Braden: So Sandra-, what's the focus of this lesson?
Sandra-: The focus of this lesson is formal means of address
Braden: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase
Sandra-: A senhora vai para Porto Alegre, não é?
Braden: Which we translated as "You're going to Porto Alegre, right ma’am?"
Sandra-: In this lesson were going to look at 4 formal titles for addressing people respectfully. What's different about these formal titles is that they can be used as subject pronouns. In other words, they can be used just like he, she, they, or even you.
Braden: First we'll look at the word senhor. Senhor literally means “Lord,” and in daily use has a very similar feel to “sir.” For example, suppose it's New Years' day and you meet one of your elderly neighbors in front of your house. He sees you and says,
Sandra-: Feliz ano novo!
Braden: "Happy new year!" Now you could respond by just saying “Happy new year!” But another option that you have is to say
Sandra-: Para o senhor também.
Braden: Which literally translates to "To you as well."
Sandra-: But to include the correct amount of respect in the translation, we would have to insert the word “sir.” so the translation becomes
Braden: “To you as well, sir.” Note how the title “o senhor" is used just like "você" or “you.”
Sandra-: The next word we'll look at is senhora. Senhora is the feminine equivalent of senhor and Means “Lady."
Braden: So, let's suppose it's Friday afternoon and you just got done speaking to the owner of the company where you work, who is a woman. She says to you,
Sandra-: Um bom final de semana para você.
Braden: "A good weekend to you."
Sandra-: E para a senhora também.
Sandra-: Which translates to
Braden: "and to ou too, ma'am." It is common to use these respectful terms when speaking to a new acquaintance, an older man or woman, or a person of high social status. For example, your significant other's parents. You should avoid the too familiar você and use only o senhor and a senhora in these situations.
Sandra-: It's also important to remember that there are plural forms for both o senhor and a senhora which are os senhores and as senhoras. These are used when speaking to groups of more than one person whom you wish to address respectfully.
Braden: The last 2 words were going to look at are seu and dona. These 2 words are Portuguese equivalents for Mr. and Mrs.
Braden: In daily conversation, you'll often hear men being addressed as "Seu Pedro" or whatever their first name it's and women being addressed as "Dona Maria" or whatever their first name is. might often here in the street someone calling to an older man by saying,
Sandra-: Boa tarde Seu cláudio! Como o senhor está?
Braden: “Good afternoon, Mr. Claudio! How are you, sir?” Or if there speaking to a woman, and maybe on the phone, something like
Sandra-: Alô, a Dona Maria se encontra?
Braden: "Hello, is Mrs. Maria there?”
Sandra-: Lets review this lesson.
Braden: Speaking respectfully to your elders is very important in Brazilian culture. Knowing the correct titles to use to address them both in public and in private is essential to making a good impression.
Sandra-: The titles o senhor and a senhora are very polite and the correct way to address people older than you, people you have just met, clients or customers, or people of high social status. Like the president of the country.

8 Comments

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PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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Boa tarde, senhoras e senhores!

How would you ask for a glass of water to an older person?

PortuguesePod101.com
Sunday at 08:43 PM
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Hello Jaimie,


Thank you for posting.


In case of any questions, please don't hesitate to contact us.


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Jaimie
Sunday at 08:58 AM
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A senhora gostaria de um copo de água? ou

O senhor gostaria de um copo de água?

PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Friday at 05:14 PM
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Oi Jonhathan,

Obrigada:grin::thumbsup:


Natsuko,

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Jonathan
Monday at 01:30 PM
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:thumbsup:

PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Friday at 10:48 PM
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Oi Jonathan,


That's right! Now, please try to use this sentence with someone!


As for "bom" and "bem" they both can be translated as "well" in English when used as adverb.

The correct form would be "bem", but people use "bom" instead very often.


I hope it helps!

Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Jonathan
Saturday at 03:04 AM
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In the conversation, Marisa starts one sentence with Bom and the other with Bem. They are both translated, "Well." I never know which one to choose-- how do you decide between the two?

Jonathan
Saturday at 03:01 AM
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O senhor gostaria de um copo de água?


I think...