Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

DIALOGUE
Jake: Onde fica o sambódromo?
Sara: Acho que fica na Zona Sul.
Jake: Zona Sul?
Sara: Sim, o Rio está dividido em zonas.
Jake: Ah tá. Então Ipanema fica em qual zona?
Sara: Também, Zona Sul.
Jake: E o Pão de Açúcar fica na Zona Sul também?
Sara: Aí não sei. Vamos olhar no mapa.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Jake: Onde fica o sambódromo?
Sara: Acho que fica na Zona Sul.
Jake: Zona Sul?
Sara: Sim, o Rio está dividido em zonas.
Jake: Ah tá. Então Ipanema fica em qual zona?
Sara: Também, Zona Sul.
Jake: E o Pão de Açúcar fica na Zona Sul também?
Sara: Aí não sei. Vamos olhar no mapa.
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Jake: Onde fica o sambódromo?
Braden: Where is the sambadrome?
Sara: Acho que fica na Zona Sul.
Braden: I think it's in the south zone.
Jake: Zona Sul?
Braden: South zone?
Sara: Sim, o Rio está dividido em zonas.
Braden: Yes, Rio is divided into zones.
Jake: Ah tá. Então Ipanema fica em qual zona?
Braden: Oh, okay. Then Ipanema is in which zone?
Sara: Também, Zona Sul.
Braden: In the south zone as well.
Jake: E o Pão de Açúcar fica na Zona Sul também?
Braden: And Sugar Loaf is in the south zone, too?
Sara: Aí não sei. Vamos olhar no mapa.
Braden: That, I don't know. Let's check the map.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Braden: So, we wanted to talk a little bit about The geography of Rio de Janeiro
Sandra-: Rio de Janeiro is divided into four main areas - the West zone, the South zone, the North zone, and the central region.
Braden: The West zone is the largest of the four zones with a population of nearly 3,000,000. There are parks, forests, and beaches for tourists but also many new apartment buildings and constructions for those who are considering a longer-term stay.
Sandra-: The South zone is the richest zone with the most expensive square foot in Brazil. The international airport is located here as well as the beaches Ipanema, Copacabana, Leblon, and Botafogo.
Braden: The Pão de Açúcar, the Bondinho, and the Christ Redeemer statue are also located in the South zone.
Sandra-: The North zone is the second-largest and contains mostly middle to low income residences and industries.
Braden: The central region is the administrative region of the city. It is also the historic center and the financial center for Rio de Janeiro and comprises unsurprisingly the central part of the city.
Sandra-: Most of the tourist points here are architectural or historical such as ancient cathedrals aqueducts, theaters, museums, and churches.
Braden: Let's take a look at the vocabulary.
VOCAB LIST
Braden: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Sandra: sambódromo [natural native speed]
Braden: Samba Drome
Sandra: sambódromo [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: sambódromo [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: zona [natural native speed]
Braden: zone
Sandra: zona [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: zona [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: zonas [natural native speed]
Braden: zones
Sandra: zonas [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: zonas [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: sul [natural native speed]
Braden: south
Sandra: sul [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: sul [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: fica [natural native speed]
Braden: he/she/it stays
Sandra: fica [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: fica [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: acho [natural native speed]
Braden: I find
Sandra: acho [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: acho [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: dividido [natural native speed]
Braden: divided
Sandra: dividido [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: dividido [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: então [natural native speed]
Braden: then
Sandra: então [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: então [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: ipanema [natural native speed]
Braden: Ipanema
Sandra: ipanema [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: ipanema [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: qual [natural native speed]
Braden: which
Sandra: qual [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: qual [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: mapa [natural native speed]
Braden: map
Sandra: mapa [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: mapa [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: olhar [natural native speed]
Braden: look
Sandra: olhar [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: olhar [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: açúcar [natural native speed]
Braden: sugar
Sandra: açúcar [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: açúcar [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sandra: pão [natural native speed]
Braden: bread
Sandra: pão [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sandra: pão [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Sandra-: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase onde fica
Braden: The literal translation is “where stays”
Sandra-: But it means “where is.” And this is a very natural phrase for asking about the location of a particular building or event. for example, you can ask someone,
Braden: “onde fica o banheiro?”
Sandra-: which translates to, “Where is the bathroom?” Or another example could be, “Onde fica o ponto de ônibus?”
Braden: which means, “Where’s the bus stop?”
Braden: Could you break this down?
Sandra-: (break down)
Braden: So what's our next phrase?
Sandra-: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase ah tá
Braden: The literal translation is “oh is”
Sandra-: But it means, “oh, okay.” This is a very natural interjection that Brazilians use often.
Braden: When someone explain something to you and it makes sense you will often say, “Ah tá.” - “Oh, okay.”
Sandra-: For example, someone says to you, “the bus stop is over there.”
Braden: You can respond to this by saying, “Ah tá.” Could you break this down?
Sandra-: (break down)
Braden: Let's move on to the focus of this lesson.

Lesson focus

Braden: So Sandra-, what's the focus of this lesson?
Sandra-: The focus of this lesson is asking and answering questions
Braden: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase
Sandra-: E o pão de açúcar fica na zona sul também?
Braden: Which we translated as "And Sugar Loaf is in the south zone, too?"
Sandra-: In this lesson, we're going to divide questions in Portuguese into 2 major categories - yes/no questions and questions that use question words.
Braden: A simple yes/no question is called that because the expected response is either a "yes" or a “no.”
Sandra-: When we ask a question in English just to be answered by "yes" or "no," we use a different intonation pattern than when we make a simple statement. For example,
Braden: "You want to go." (The voice drops off of at the end.)
Sandra-: compared to
Braden: "Do you want to go?" (The voice rises at the end.)
Sandra-: This intonation pattern is the key to asking yes/no questions in Portuguese. In English, we add a “do” as in “Do you know the way home?” or reorder the words to make a question.
Braden: For example, "Are you tired?” instead of “You are tired?” Portuguese however, does none of this. The only thing that identifies a yes/no question is the intonation. For example, the statement
Sandra-: Você está cansado.
Braden: "You are tired." To change the Portuguese into a question you merely change the intonation. Nothing else changes.
Sandra-: Você está cansado?
Braden: "Are you tired?" The same rules apply for questions that in English would require the auxiliary verb “do.” For example, look at the simple statement
Sandra-: Eles gostam de mamão.
Braden: "They like papaya."
Sandra-: Eles gostam de mamão?
Braden: "Do they like papaya?"
Sandra-: The key here is the intonation; the rise and quick drop on the last accented syllable.
Braden: A notable exception to this intonation rule is the use of question words. Let's go through Portuguese question words.
Sandra-: quem
Braden: “who"
Sandra-: onde
Braden: "where"
Sandra-: quando
Braden: "when"
Sandra-: o que
Braden: “what"
Sandra-: qual
Braden: “which"
Sandra-: como
Braden: “how"
Sandra-: por que
Braden: "why”. When you ask a question using a question word in Portuguese, the intonation Is no longer the determining factor. For example,
Sandra-: De onde você é?
Braden: “Where you from?” This question intonation pattern descends from the first word to the last word. There is no rise at the last syllable. However, sometimes the intonation pattern is extremely similar to yes no questions. For example,
Sandra-: Como você faz isso?
Braden: “How do you do that?”
Sandra-: Note the rise in intonation on the word faz. The key here is to recognize that it is the question word that makes it a question, not the intonation.
Sandra-: Lets review this lesson.
Braden: To ask a yes/no question in Portuguese, use the same word order as for statement but add to it a questioning intonation pattern. The word order remains the same.
Sandra-: And don't translate "do" in yes/no questions. The word “do” as an auxiliary verb does not exist in Portuguese.
Braden: And questions that use question words don't follow this intonation rule. They may still have this intonation pattern but it is not necessary.

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PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Que zonas do Rio você gostaria de visitar?

What zones of Rio (de Janeiro) would you like to visit?

PortuguesePod101.com
Sunday at 8:44 pm
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Hi Jaimie,


Thank you for leaving the comment.


If you have any questions, please let us know.


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Jaimie
Sunday at 4:54 am
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Eu gostaria de visitar a zona sul. E muito caro?