Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

Hi! Welcome to Introduction to Portuguese. My name is Alisha and I'm joined by...
Hi everyone! I'm Ana Clara
In this lesson, we'll focus on teaching you the most useful Portuguese words and phrases for absolute beginners!
Make sure you're repeating the words out loud after I say the examples!
Are you ready? Let's get started!
Expressing Thanks and Forgiveness
The best phrase to learn when studying a new language is one that expresses gratitude and appreciation. If you had to learn only a single phrase, this would be it!
We taught you this word in the first lesson of this series. Do you remember what it was?
Obrigado / Obrigada
It means “Thank you.”
Say Obrigado if you're male, or Obrigada if you're female.
Obrigado / Obrigada
“Thank you”
Keep repeating after Ana Clara until you get it!
Obrigado / Obrigada
Your turn!
Obrigado / Obrigada
Obrigado / Obrigada
Do you remember how we talked about pronunciation of the letter R here, in lesson 2? Don't pronounce it like an English R; don't roll your tongue. Listen to how Ana Clara is pronouncing this sound.
ri
Think of the quick tapping motion your tongue makes as it strikes the top gum ridge in words like “ladder” or “butter.”
ri
ri
Altogether it's...
Obrigado / Obrigada
Ok, one last time.
Obrigado / Obrigada
Ok. The next phrase we'll teach you is perhaps the second most useful phrase of all. It's to excuse yourself.
Com licença
It means “excuse me”
Com licença
“Excuse me”
Use this phrase when you want to grab someone's attention or when you brush by someone in the streets.
Com licença
If you recall, we talked about nasal vowels in lesson 2 too. Like this one:
en
To pronounce it, you need to lower your soft palate and the back of your tongue, unblocking the nasal passage, and allowing air to pass through the naval cavity and out through the nose.
Imagine you're humming with your mouth open, and add the E vowel sound to it.
en
Now you try.
en
Again!
en
Altogether it's...
Com licença
On a daily basis, Brazilians tend to drop the first word, saying simply...
Com licença
And what about showing forgiveness? That is very important in any country. In Brazilian Portuguese, the most common way to say “I'm sorry” is...
Me desculpe
“I’m sorry”
On a daily basis, people often drop the pronoun “Me,” saying just
Me desculpe
But it can also be said
Me desculpa
“I’m sorry”
or simply
Desculpa
“Sorry”
Both ways are correct. Note that this variation is due to conjugation aspects, and it's not gender related. You can say both ways regardless of your gender. Let's listen.
Me desculpe
“I’m sorry”
Desculpa
“Sorry”
It's very useful when you bump into someone when taking the busy subway lines of São Paulo. Let's practice a little.
Me desculpe
“I’m sorry”
Now you try!
Me desculpe
“I’m sorry”
Now let's try the variation.
Desculpa
“Sorry”
Desculpa
“Sorry”
One last time.
Desculpa
“Sorry”
Great!
Now you can say "thank you," "excuse me," and "I'm sorry" in Portuguese. Let's move on.
Where is...?
Asking where something is is an incredibly important and useful phrase to learn. You're going to need this when asking where the bathroom, the subway station, the bus stop, or where the hotel is.
To ask where something is, you should say...
Onde fica...
“Where is…”
Then, you should verify the gender of the location you want to know about, so you can place the proper article: feminine “a” or masculine “o.”
Onde fica a/o....
“Where is the…”
Lastly, add the location. If you want to know where the bathroom is, you should say
Onde fica o banheiro?
“Where is the bathroom?”
The word for “bathroom” in Portuguese is a masculine gender. So, like Ana Clara said, we put the definite masculine article “o” before the noun.
“Where is the bathroom?”
Onde fica o banheiro?
For the subway station, it'll be...
Onde fica o metrô?
“Where is the subway?”
And so on. Just remember the gender to use the correct article. Let's see some vocabulary so that you can use in this sentence! Here are some of the most common words you'll need to learn:
Banheiro
“Bathroom”
Onde fica o banheiro?
Where is the bathroom?
Next...
Metrô
“Subway”
Onde fica o metrô?
“Where is the subway (station)?”
If you ask this question, they'll direct you to the closest subway station. If you'd like to ask where a specific station is, like Consolação station, for example, simply place the name of the station after “subway.”
Onde fica o metrô Consolação?
“Where is Consolação (subway) station?”
Or you can say just “station” instead of “subway.”
Onde fica a estação Consolação?
Where is Consolação station?
Next...
Hotel
“Hotel”
See that in Portuguese, H as the first letter is always silent, except for specific foreign loanwords.
Onde fica o hotel?
“Where is the hotel?”
For a specific hotel, do the same as before. Just place the name after “hotel.”
Hotel Intercontinental
“Intercontinental Hotel”
Onde fica o Hotel Intercontinental?
“Where is the Intercontinental Hotel?”
Next...
Padaria
“Bakery”
Bakeries, especially in São Paulo, are really popular. There are a lot of bakeries in the city, and they usually are a blend of a bakery, a deli, a coffee shop, a restaurant and a pizza parlour all in one place. Often even a mini-market as well, and sometimes, acting as a bar at night. There are enormous franchise bakeries as well as smaller family ones. So, knowing this is extremely useful, especially in São Paulo.
OK. So how do we ask where the bakery is?
Onde fica a padaria?
“Where is the bakery?”
You can substitute almost anything and simply add...
Onde fica o/a...?
“Where is the…?”
to ask where something is in Portuguese.
In this final lesson, you learned how to say “thank you,” “excuse me,” “I'm sorry,” and to ask where something is in Portuguese.
And in this series, we introduced you to the basics of Portuguese pronunciation, grammar, writing, and more. Let's conclude with some parting advice from Ana Clara, and listen to some of her tips on how to learn Portuguese from a native Brazilian perspective.
Parting Advice - Insider Knowledge
The best way to learn Portuguese, particularly if you want to improve your communication skills, is to watch and study contemporary Brazilian videos, like soap operas and news programs. That way you can learn expressions and the peculiarities of pronunciation that you can't learn from regular grammar books and methods. A great way to learn, which is also pleasant, is studying with MPB – Brazilian popular music. Brazil is famous for this unique type of music, and the lyrics usually mix formal and informal Portuguese in a rich and poetic way. You can increase your vocabulary while enjoying good music and learning more about the country's culture and history.
A big mistake I see learners make is not asking native speakers for help with the language. Brazilians are in general very warm and receptive; they want to be polite, so they won't correct your grammar or pronunciation. They are usually flattered and happy to see the effort in Portuguese, so they reciprocate with doing their best to understand foreigners and not paying attention to their mistakes. Because of that, a lot of learners end up plateauing in their Portuguese by getting too comfortable. Don't do that!
Ask your Brazilian friends and colleagues to help and correct you. Tell them it will not offend you – on the contrary, it will make you very happy. If you're not in Brazil, a tip is to browse the web for Brazilians who are willing to be your friends. It shouldn't be difficult! Practice your pronunciation a lot, and try your best to remember noun genders; make a list, if you need! It's very common for learners to mix the genders up, as there is no exact rule to determine when a noun is masculine or feminine.
Watching contemporary videos, such as our videos here at PortuguesePod101, will ensure that you're learning real, applicable Portuguese in the fastest and most effective way.
You've reached the end of this course “Introduction to Portuguese,” but it's only the beginning of your journey to Portuguese fluency! Where do you go from here? Try our “Portuguese in 3 Minutes” series where we teach you beginner vocabulary and even more useful phrases! Or check out any of our other video series. We have many different categories for you to choose from.
Good luck as you continue learning Portuguese, and I'll see you in another video!
Bye!
Bye!

7 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Friday at 06:30 PM
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Where do you go from here? Try our Learn Portuguese in Three Minutes series where we teach you beginner vocabulary and even more useful phrases!
https://www.portuguesepod101.com/index.php?cat=42

PortuguesePod101.com
Tuesday at 11:18 PM
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Hi Asuka,


Great to have you here!


Please stay tuned, as we'll have new lessons for you every week! And if you have any questions, feel free to ask us.


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Asuka Nguyen
Tuesday at 03:35 PM
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Obrigada por fazer esses vídeos! 😳

PortuguesePod101.com
Saturday at 04:44 PM
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Olá Mike,


Indeed at regular speed the pronunciation resembles the "u" sound at the end for some accents. This happens normally when you listen to a native speaker, so it's good to get used to it. 👍


To know more about Portuguese pronunciation, please check out this special series:

https://www.portuguesepod101.com/lesson-library/ultimate-portuguese-pronunciation-guide/


In case of any questions, please don't hesitate to contact us.


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Mike Schmidt
Monday at 03:13 AM
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When you listen to Obrigado in regular speed, the "o" at the end sounds like a "u" but when you slow it down to .5 speed she definitely makes a "o" sound. Can you help me understand why?

PortuguesePod101.com
Saturday at 12:14 AM
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Olá Dena!


The entries that are not in the [Vocabulary] section you can check them out in our Portuguese Dictionary:

https://www.portuguesepod101.com/portuguese-dictionary/


And add them to your [Work Bank]. From the [Word Bank] you can synchronize the entries to your [Flashcards] by clicking on the upper button [Sync to Flashcards].


Hope this helps! Let us know if you have any questions.


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team PortuguesePod101.com

dena
Friday at 07:55 AM
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this is great. I'd like to add the newest words from this lesson (to the word bank or flash cards) onibus, metro, pandaria, etc. thank you.