Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Braden: Hello, and welcome to PortuguesePOD101.com, the fastest, easiest, and most fun way to learn Portuguese!
Sílvia: I'm Sílvia, and thanks again for being here with us for this Intermediate S1 lesson.
Camila: So Braden, please tell us what we'll be learning in this lesson.
Braden: In this lesson, we'll be learning talking about the game
Camila: Where does this conversation take place and who is it between?
Braden: This conversation takes place in the afternoon, at Ricardo's house, João &ricardo
Camila: What's the formality level?
Braden: Well, it's informal.
Camila: Let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
João: Pronto pra ver um jogão?
Ricardo: Jogão? O seu time vai perder de goleada.
João: Eita! Não fique tão confiante assim. O jogo nem começou ainda.
Ricardo: Mas vai perder sim. Não esqueça que seu time nunca ganhou do meu.
João: E como eu vou esquecer? Você não deixa.
Ricardo: Você trouxe a cerveja?
João: Trouxe.
Ricardo: Vou pôr na geladeira. Eu fiz uma carninha na brasa que tá uma delícia.
João: Opa, futebol, cerveja e churrasco, tá tudo perfeito!
Ricardo: Então fica pra ver o segundo tempo aqui também.
João: Não posso, a minha mulher pediu para chegar cedo.
Ricardo: Pra que? Hoje é sabado! O que você tem pra fazer hoje que é mais importante que o jogo?
João: Íamos ao cinema. Tem um filme romântico que ela quer assistir.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
João: Pronto pra ver um jogão?
Ricardo: Jogão? O seu time vai perder de goleada.
João: Eita! Não fique tão confiante assim. O jogo nem começou ainda.
Ricardo: Mas vai perder sim. Não esqueça que seu time nunca ganhou do meu.
João: E como eu vou esquecer? Você não deixa.
Ricardo: Você trouxe a cerveja?
João: Trouxe.
Ricardo: Vou pôr na geladeira. Eu fiz uma carninha na brasa que tá uma delícia.
João: Opa, futebol, cerveja e churrasco, tá tudo perfeito!
Ricardo: Então fica pra ver o segundo tempo aqui também.
João: Não posso, a minha mulher pediu para chegar cedo.
Ricardo: Pra que? Hoje é sabado! O que você tem pra fazer hoje que é mais importante que o jogo?
João: Íamos ao cinema. Tem um filme romântico que ela quer assistir.
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
João: Pronto pra ver um jogão?
Braden: Ready to watch a big game?
Ricardo: Jogão? O seu time vai perder de goleada.
Braden: Big game? Your team is going to get routed.
João: Eita! Não fique tão confiante assim. O jogo nem começou ainda.
Braden: What! Don't be so confident. The game hasn't even started.
Ricardo: Mas vai perder sim. Não esqueça que seu time nunca ganhou do meu.
Braden: But you're going to lose. Don't forget that your team has never beaten mine.
João: E como eu vou esquecer? Você não deixa.
Braden: How could I forget? You won't let me.
Ricardo: Você trouxe a cerveja?
Braden: Did you bring the beer?
João: Trouxe.
Braden: Yep.
Ricardo: Vou pôr na geladeira. Eu fiz uma carninha na brasa que tá uma delícia.
Braden: I'll put it in the fridge. I barbecued some steak that's just delicious.
João: Opa, futebol, cerveja e churrasco, tá tudo perfeito!
Braden: Hey, hey! Soccer, beer, and barbecue. Everything is perfect.
Ricardo: Então fica pra ver o segundo tempo aqui também.
Braden: Then stay for the second half as well.
João: Não posso, a minha mulher pediu para chegar cedo.
Braden: I can't. My wife asked me to come home early.
Ricardo: Pra que? Hoje é sabado! O que você tem pra fazer hoje que é mais importante que o jogo?
Braden: What for? Today is Saturday! What do you have to do today that's more important than the game?
João: Íamos ao cinema. Tem um filme romântico que ela quer assistir.
Braden: We were going to go to the movies. There's a romantic film that she wants to watch.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Braden: (ask --- something about the dialogue-Peter always does a little review about the previous lessons. explain what you are thinking about the storyline in the lesson, so the students can follow and participate - don't make them guess.)
---: response
Braden: so there are a lot of flat screens in Brazil.
---: Well,usually the friend or family member with the biggest TV is where everybody goes to watch the game.
Braden: That's right. This is very normal and for the most part welcome in Brazil. Brazilians enjoy being in large groups and having their friends around and for some people, like some grandparents, it's nearly a weekly tradition
---: This varies a bit by region but especially in southern Brazil, the "Sunday" meal is churrasco.
Braden: (Football parties, ever been to one?-describe a saturday one.)
VOCAB LIST
Braden: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Sílvia: jogão [natural native speed]
Braden: big game, the big game
Sílvia: jogão [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílvia: jogão [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílvia: geladeira [natural native speed]
Braden: fridge, refrigerator, ice box
Sílvia: geladeira [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílvia: geladeira [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílvia: delícia [natural native speed]
Braden: delicacy, delicious thing
Sílvia: delícia [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílvia: delícia [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílvia: brasa [natural native speed]
Braden: ember
Sílvia: brasa [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílvia: brasa [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílvia: romântico [natural native speed]
Braden: romantic
Sílvia: romântico [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílvia: romântico [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílvia: perfeito [natural native speed]
Braden: perfect
Sílvia: perfeito [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílvia: perfeito [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílvia: confiante [natural native speed]
Braden: confident
Sílvia: confiante [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílvia: confiante [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílvia: perder [natural native speed]
Braden: to lose
Sílvia: perder [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílvia: perder [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
---: The first phrase we'll look at is perder de goleada.
Braden: Perder is the Portuguese verb for "to lose" and goleada is a soccer term that means lots of goals.
---: So, perder de goleada means "to lose by a lot" or "to lose by many points."
Braden: could you break this down?
---: (break down)
Braden: what's our next phrase?
---: The next phrase we'll look at is segundo tempo. Segundo tempo literally translates to second time but it means "second half" as in second half of the game.
Braden: could you break this down?
---: (break down)
Braden: what's our next phrase?
---: The next phrase we'll look at is minha mulher
Braden: Okay so, Minha mulher literally translates to "my woman."
---: but that phrase isn't as offensive in Portuguese as it is in English.
Braden: That's right. Calling your wife your "mulher" is a very common if a bit old. For example, in the Bible, Adam and Eve are titled as marido e mulher or "husband and woman."
---: So in this sense, mulher also means wife.
Braden: could you break this down?
---: (break down)

Lesson focus

Braden: So ---, what's the focus of this lesson?
---: The focus of this lesson is Stem Changing verbs. In the dialogue, we heard the phrase "Eita! Não fique tão confiante assim. O jogo nem começou ainda."
Braden: Which we translated as "What! Don't be so confident. The game hasn't even started."
---: Okay, in this sentence two verbs have stem changes, the ficar and the começar.
Braden: That's right. The spelling of a verb stem must sometimes be altered to preserve its sound in te various persons. These orthographic changes come when the conjugations require certain sounds to come before the original stem spelling.
---: Okay so there are way to many to just start listing in the audio
Braden: Yeah, it would be like going through the alphabet and since this one is pretty focused on spelling, it really is better that you follow along with the PDF. But we'll go through 2 from each so you can get the idea.
---: okay so there are two conditinos when you might need to do a spelling change. When verbs that end in car, gar, or çar and the stem comes before an "e" after the verb is conjugated then specific things happen.
Braden: Right. So, when you have a car verb like ficar which is what was used in the dialogue, a "que" replaces the c. so you have ficar - f-i-c-a-r conjugated to the command form which makes it fique. f-i-c-e
---: But in Portuguese, any time a "c" is followed by an "e" then the "c" is pronounced a "ss." So, to preserve the "k" sound - which is very important - the c is replaced by qu. So, fique is actually spelled f-i-q-u-e, not f-i-c-e.
Braden: Okay so following the same pattern, with verbs than end it gar in their infinitive form a gu replaces the g when they preceed an "e."
---: And a "c" replaces a "ç."
Braden: When followed by an "e"
---: okay so the verb ficar is one example, which becomes fique. Another would be brigar which is a gar verb and becomes brigue - b-r-i-g-u-e. And last would be a çar verb
Braden: Right. So in the dialouge the verb começar was used. So it changes from começar with a "ç" to comece without the "ç." So comece is spelled, c-o-m-e-c-e not c-o-m-e-ç-e.
---: Right. The other rule is when certain verbs are followed by o or a. When verbs end in cer a "ç" replaces "c." and when the verb ends in gir a j relpaces the g.
Braden: Could you give us some examples?
---: One common verb ending in cer is descer which means to descend, go down. So, when the conjugation you are using ends in a or o then the c needs to change to "ç". so descer to the first person present becomes "desço." spelled d-e-s-ç-o or command form would be "desçamos."
Braden: Notice the s and ç right after each other. It doesn't really mean anything special, just so that you know it is possible.
---: One common verb ending in gir is corrigir which means to correct. So, when the conjugation you are using ends in a or o then the g needs to change to "j". so corrigir to the first person present becomes "corrijo." spelled "c-o-r-r-i-j-o" or command form would be "c-o-r-r-i-j-a-m-o-s."
Braden: Just a side comment, I've never actually heard anyone say "corrijamos" (have you?)
---: Okay so this one is about writing so it would be very beneficial for you to get that PDF and examine it closely.
Braden: Yeah there are many more examles and some sample sntences there fore yo uas well. That just about does it for this lesson.
---: Thanks for listening!~

Outro

Braden: That just about does it for today.
Braden: Attention perfectionists! You're about to learn how to perfect your pronunciation.
Sílvia: Lesson Review Audio Tracks.
Braden: Increase fluency and vocabulary fast with these short, effective audio tracks.
Sílvia: Super simple to use. Listen to the Portuguese word or phrase...
Braden: then repeat it out loud in a loud clear voice.
Sílvia: You'll speak with confidence knowing that you're speaking Portuguese like the locals.
Braden: Go to PortuguesePod101.com, and download the Review Audio Tracks right on the lessons page today!
Braden: Tchau pra vocês!
Sílvia: Até mais!

11 Comments

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PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
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Não fala mal do time!

PortuguesePod101.com
Thursday at 05:11 PM
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Olá Amanda,


De nada!


In case of any questions, please don't hesitate to contact us.👍


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Amanda
Thursday at 08:52 AM
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Muito obrigada, Christiane!

PortuguesePod101.com
Wednesday at 05:45 PM
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Olá Amanda,


Thank you for posting.


The sentences you mentioned from the [Dialogue] referring to "Don't be so confident. The game hasn't even started." in Portuguese had a more relaxed style to show an informal daily conversation. Therefore, they are not literally translated.


"Não fique tão confiante assim." (Don't be so confident (like that)) is a common expression in Brazilian Portuguese. You can consider it as a set example. You could omit "assim", but it sounds more natural with it.


"O jogo nem começou ainda." would be literally translated as "The game hasn't even started yet."; the speaker uses a casual / relaxed way of speaking. The structure "(something) hasn't even started yet" could be, in Brazilian Portuguese, either "(algo) ainda não/nem começou." or even "(algo) não/nem começou ainda.", but again "nem" sounds more natural in a very casual conversation.


Hope this helps! Feel free to let us know if you have any questions.


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Amanda
Wednesday at 07:02 AM
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Oi PortuguesePod!


Tenho uma pergunta... fico confusada com as palavras "assim" e "ainda." Especificamente, nestas frases... "Não fique tão confiante assim. O jogo nem começou ainda." Por que ele usa "assim" com "tao"? E necessario ou pode falar so "não fique tão confiante"? E tambem, por que ele usa "nem" com "ainda" e nao "nao"?


Muito obrigada!

Portuguesepod101.com      
Monday at 10:30 PM
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Olá Chris,


Thanks for posting.


Yes, it is usual to omit the object which was already informed previously:


"Você trouxe a cerveja?" (Did you bring the beer?)

"Trouxe" (Yep)

"Vou pôr na geladeira" (I'll put it in the fridge), instead of repeating "Vou pôr a cerveja na geladeira" (I'll put the beer in the fridge),


Regarding "aprecio muito" as a thanks, we usually say "Obrigado" (Thank you), "brigado" (thanks, when spoken mainly) or "valeu" (tks! - but very casual) :)


If you have any further questions, please let us know.:wink:

Chris Censullo
Saturday at 02:38 PM
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Muito obrigado pelas aulas! Aprecio muito. The line "Vou pôr na geladeira" intrigues me. I notice that there are often times when the object pronoun is left out of a sentence. For instance, in my Portuguese I started with, I'm trying to say "Thank you very much for the lessons. I really appreciate them." Could I say it like I did, just "Aprecio muito", rather than including the "them" ("Aprecio-as muito.")?


Outra vez, agradeço sinceramente a vocês,


Chris

Portuguesepod101.com     
Saturday at 04:57 AM
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Hello Andrew,


Thanks for posting.


Actually the correct writing is "Vou pôr na geladeira" (I'll put it in the fridge). The verb "pôr" indeed uses a circumflex accent.


Our team corrected the Lesson Notes pdf & Lesson Materials.



Thank you for your patience. :wink:


Cristiane

Team Portuguesepod101.com

Andrew
Friday at 11:01 PM
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On line 8, where Ricardo says, "Vou por na geladeira", the translation says, "I'll put it in the fridge." Is there suppose to be a circumflex on the 'o' in "por" and is it to suppose to mean literally "to put" in the line or is it suppose to be "por" without the circumflex and suppose to mean "by, or for" and not interpreted literally?



Thanks!


Andrew

PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Monday at 04:52 PM
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Oi Niloo,


Obrigada pela pergunta.

Aqui nós estamos "estar" porque nesse caso específico a "está uma delícia", mas pode acontecer no futuro ou no passado de a carne não estar gostosa.

Se nós falarmos "é uma delícia", significa que a carne sempre é gostosa, e nunca é ruim.


E "tá tudo perfeito" (agora), mas daqui a pouco pode não estar mais. Se você falar que "tudo é perfeito", significa que nunca acontece nenhum problema :smile:


Será que ficou claro?

Me avisa se tiver alguma dúvida!

Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Niloo
Monday at 11:38 AM
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Boa noite, tenho uma pergunta sobre o usuário de palavra "está". Neste diálogo Ricardo disse "eu fiz uma carninha na brasa que tá uma delícia." Porque ele usa a palavra está em lugar de ser? Acho que delícia é uma caraterística dum carne? Além disso, ele também disse "tá tudo perfeito!" Porque ele não fala "tudo é perfeito".


Valeu pela sua ajuda :-)


Niloo