Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Braden: Hello, and welcome to PortuguesePOD101.com, the fastest, easiest, and most fun way to learn Portuguese!
Sílvia: I'm Sílvia, and thanks again for being here with us for this Intermediate S1 lesson.
Camila: So Braden, please tell us what we'll be learning in this lesson.
Braden: In this lesson, we'll be learning talking about your day
Camila: Where does this conversation take place and who is it between?
Braden: This conversation takes place at night, at home, mônica, diego
Camila: What's the formality level?
Braden: Well, it's informal.
Camila: Let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Mônica: Diego, você está com uma cara tão tristinha...
Diego: É que eu tô com um pouco de dor de cabeça.
Mônica: Aconteceu alguma coisa?
Diego: Não, eu só tive um dia estressante, trabalhei muito hoje.
Mônica: Vendeu muito?
Diego: Sim, batemos a meta da semana.
Mônica: Que ótimo! Veja o lado positivo.
Diego: Sim, por esse lado foi bom sim, mas eu nem almocei hoje. Vendi, vendi e vendi desde a hora que eu cheguei.
Mônica: Aproveita sua folga amanhã pra descansar então.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Mônica: Diego, você está com uma cara tão tristinha...
Diego: É que eu tô com um pouco de dor de cabeça.
Mônica: Aconteceu alguma coisa?
Diego: Não, eu só tive um dia estressante, trabalhei muito hoje.
Mônica: Vendeu muito?
Diego: Sim, batemos a meta da semana.
Mônica: Que ótimo! Veja o lado positivo.
Diego: Sim, por esse lado foi bom sim, mas eu nem almocei hoje. Vendi, vendi e vendi desde a hora que eu cheguei.
Mônica: Aproveita sua folga amanhã pra descansar então.
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Mônica: Diego, você está com uma cara tão tristinha...
Braden: Diego, you look so sad...
Diego: É que eu tô com um pouco de dor de cabeça.
Braden: It's just that I've got a bit of a headache.
Mônica: Aconteceu alguma coisa?
Braden: Did anything happen?
Diego: Não, eu só tive um dia estressante, trabalhei muito hoje.
Braden: No, I just had a stressful day. I worked a lot today.
Mônica: Vendeu muito?
Braden: Did you sell a lot?
Diego: Sim, batemos a meta da semana.
Braden: Yes, we met this week's goal.
Mônica: Que ótimo! Veja o lado positivo.
Braden: That's great! Look on the bright side.
Diego: Sim, por esse lado foi bom sim, mas eu nem almocei hoje. Vendi, vendi e vendi desde a hora que eu cheguei.
Braden: Yeah, looking from that angle it was good, but I didn't even eat lunch today. I sold, sold, and sold, from opening to closing.
Mônica: Aproveita sua folga amanhã pra descansar então.
Braden: Take advantage of your day off tomorrow and rest then.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Braden: (ask --- something about the dialogue-Peter always does a little review about the previous lessons. explain what you are thinking about the storyline in the lesson, so the students can follow and participate - don't make them guess.)
---: response
Women talk
Braden: okay so Portuguese has grammar structures called diminutives and augmentatives.
---: These are suffixes that either diminish or augment the meaning of a Portuguese word. We'll talk about these in a bit more detail in a later lesson but in the dialogue Mônica used the word "tristinha."
Braden: The cultural insight here is that a man probably would not have said that.
---: That's right. He would have said triste. In Portuguese, specifically the diminutive has a strong feminine feel to it.
Braden: It's not restricted to women, and men do use it without harming their masculinity, but the feminine undertones are pretty strong. (Have you every noticed this before?)
VOCAB LIST
Braden: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Sílvia: estressante [natural native speed]
Braden: stressful
Sílvia: estressante [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílvia: estressante [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílvia: meta [natural native speed]
Braden: goal
Sílvia: meta [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílvia: meta [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílvia: positivo [natural native speed]
Braden: positive
Sílvia: positivo [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílvia: positivo [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílvia: nem [natural native speed]
Braden: nor, the opposite of or
Sílvia: nem [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílvia: nem [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílvia: aproveitar [natural native speed]
Braden: to enjoy, to take advantage of (positively), to avail onesself of
Sílvia: aproveitar [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílvia: aproveitar [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílvia: folga [natural native speed]
Braden: rest
Sílvia: folga [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílvia: folga [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílvia: inalar [natural native speed]
Braden: to inhale
Sílvia: inalar [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílvia: inalar [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílvia: cara [natural native speed]
Braden: face, facial expression
Sílvia: cara [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílvia: cara [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílvia: descansar [natural native speed]
Braden: to rest
Sílvia: descansar [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílvia: descansar [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
---: The first word we'll look at is Cara.
Braden: In the dialogue, cara means "face" or "facial expression." We've already learned the word cara to mean "dude" or "man" but this one is different.
---: The main difference is that cara to mean "face" or "facial expression" is a feminine word but cara to mean "dude" or "man" is a masculine word.
Braden: That's right so it's o cara, the dude, or a cara, the face
---: The next phrase we'll look at is Estar com uma cara...
Braden: estar com uma cara... literally translates "to be with a face" but it means "to look" as is "to look like something" or "to appear like something."
---: This can be used with people and with inanimate items like plates of food. "este prato está com uma cara boa."
---: The next word we'll look at is folga. Folga has several meanings among which are "looseness," "relaxedness," and "day off."
Braden: As you can see they're all inter related but in this context folga just means "day off."
---: The next word we'll look at is meta. The best translation for the word meta is "goal" but many Brazilians are unfamiliar with the word meta so often the word objetivo "objective" is used to mean goal instead.
Braden: The next word we'll look at is
---: nem. Technically, nem is the negative form of the word ou which means "or."
Braden: In many cases this will simply translate to "nor" in English but in this dialogue, the meaning is much closer to "didn't even."

Lesson focus

Braden: So ---, what's the focus of this lesson?
---: The focus of this lesson is Preterit -ar, -er, ir.
Braden: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase
---: Vendi, vendi e vendi desde a hora que eu cheguei.
Braden: Which we translated as "Diego
---: This is the example of the preterit tense. The preterite is the past tense you use to report "what happenend." -Ar, -er, and -ir verbs each have their own sets of endings, all of them are quite similar.
Braden: We've already covered when to use the preterit tense so we wont' go over that again. In this lesson we are going to cover the practials of the pretérito perfeito.
---: That's right. So first off regular -ar verbs in the pretérito. let's use the verb inalar which means to inhale.
---: eu inalei, você/ele/ela inalou, etc. inalamos-inalaram
Braden: Could you give us some examples?
---: Sure. Não achei meu dinheiro. means "I didn't find my money."
Braden: and one more
---: This is one form a famous Portuguese writer "Inalando do exterior a nova substância da sua nutrição" (Latino Coelho).
Braden: Woah, that's poetic. Which translates to "Inhaling from the exterior the new substance of it's nutrition."
---: Here he's referring to the Portuguese lanugage. So, less poetically it would be "The Portuguese language is being nourished by new substances from outside Portugal."
Braden: Okay so There are regular spelling changes that affect the eu-form in the -ar preterite. Now, we're going to explain this but trust me, you'll want to look at the table in the PDF so be sure to look at that.
---: Okay, so the -u- preserves the "hard" g and c sounds before e.
Braden: That’s the rule. So take the verb chegar and put in to the first person preterit, you get cheguei. cheguei has an extra "u" between the g and the "ei."
---: This isn't really an irregularity. It's just a spelling change as the sound stays the same.
Braden: If you spell cheguei without the "u", and just do -gei- it would be pronounced as in gente, or chegei. Which is not a word in Portuguese, although it might be in French.
---: so the other case is when the verb ends in -car. Let's take the verb explicar. Here the -c- has to change to -qu-, otherwise the -cei would be pronounced as in explicei. Which might be italian but it's not Portuguese.
Braden: And last, a "ç" becomes a "c" before -e- and and -i-, always. So the verb começar has a "ç" because it's followed by the ar in the infinitive. When começar is conjugate to the first person preterit, then the "ç" is unnecessary, so it just becomes a "c" comecei."
---: Okay so some examples would be Eu fiquei muito irado conta ele. which means "I was very angry with him." and Eu dancei a noite toda. – "I danced all night long."
Braden: Okay on to the -er verbs let's use the verb responder. Could yougo through the conjugation for us?
---: Sure. respondi-respondeu-respondemos-responderam
Braden: Could you give us some examples?
---: Você comeu o sanduíche. which means "You at the sandwich." and Vocês aprenderam bem a lição. – "You learned the lesson well."
Braden: Any exceptions with these?
---: Not that we haven't talked about before.
Braden: Okay, so on to ir verbs. Could you give us the conjugation for regular ir verbs?
---: I'll use the verb assistir assisti-assistiu-assistimos-assistiram
Braden: Could you give us some examples?
---: Eu parti ontem às nove. – "I left last night at nine." and another would be Vocês pediram as canetas. – "Y'all asked for the pens." or "Y'all ordered the pens."
Braden: Okay so quick not. Normally, none of these forms have an accent in the preterite, but sair (and other verbs whose stem ends in -a) does in the eu, nós, and eles forms - saí, saiu, saímos, and saíram. This is done because of diphthongs which we haven't gotten into yet.
---: Simply put. The accent mark goes on the tonic syllable which, since this is preterit, is on the last syllable. But because a and i together in Portuguese make a diphthong, which means one sound, when you write it you have to manually force the tonic syllable to the last syllable with a written accent.
Braden: So, sai is present tense (no accent) and saí is preterit tense and has an accent mark on the -i-. Could you give us a sample sentence?
---: Eu saí de casa às cinco e meia da manhã. Which translates to "I left home at five-thirty in the morning."
Braden: And another example would be?
---: Eu não sei porque, mas saímos daquele lugar. Which translates to "I don't know why but we left that place."
Braden: okay so some -Ir tips. -Ir verbs that have eu-forms with vowel changes in the presenet tense (dormir-durmo, mentir-minto, servir-sirvo) don't do that in the preterit.
---: In other words, they are slightly irregular in the present tense but that irregularity doesn't carry to the preterit tense.
Braden: This is important for Spanish speakers learning Portuguese because Spanish does this but Portuguse doesn't.
---: Okay so last tip. For all regular verbs, -ar, -er, and -ir, the nós form looks the same in the present and the preterite. It will be obvious through the context what the intended tense is. so this isn't a big deal but just so you don't second guess yourself, we're telling you before hand.
Braden: Well that just about does it for this lesson!
---: Thanks for listening!

Outro

Braden: That just about does it for today.
Sílvia: Dear listeners, ever pressed for time?
Braden: Listen to the Dialogue Lesson Recap!
Sílvia: These audio tracks only contain the target lesson dialogue.
Braden: So you can quickly recap a lesson.
Sílvia: Spend a few minutes learning on days when you don't have time to study a full lesson.
Braden: The audio tracks are just a few minutes long...
Sílvia: but you'll still pick up key Portuguese phrases along the way.
Braden: Go to PortuguesePod101.com,
Sílvia: and listen to this lesson's dialogue only audio track.
Braden: Have fun studying!
Sílvia: Boa noite!

11 Comments

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PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 6:30 pm
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Quando foi a primeira vez que você pisou em terra brasileira?

Portuguesepod101.comVerified
Sunday at 8:18 pm
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Hi Andrew,


Thanks for posting.


"Estar com uma cara" would be more used in informal situations, in daily conversations. And, indeed, as explained in the Lesson Notes, it can be used to talk about food, for example:

"Humm... esta sobremesa está com uma cara tão boa. Acho que vou querer uma fatia maior."

(Humm.... this dessert looks so good (= seems to be delicious). I think I'll want a bigger serving."


Also, to talk to someone close to you, a friend of a person in your family:

"Estela, você tá bem? Tá com uma carinha de cansada..."

("Are you okay, Estela? You look so tired... (literally would be "You have such a tired face (now)")


But we don't use that expression in formal situations. Instead we would use "parecer"

"Está tudo bem com a Priscila? Ela parece estar passando mal..."

("Is Priscila fine? She doesn't seem well...")


About your question on how to refer to someone who looks happy, you could use either structures in an informal situation:

"Que legal te ver assim, Andreia! Está com uma carinha tão feliz"

(It's (so) nice to see you like this, Andreia! You look so happy"

Or

"A Andreia parece estar muito contente com o presente, né?"

"Andreia seems to be very happy with the gift, doesn't she?"


"Olhar" is not used in that sense. It means "to look at" and would be used differently:

"Ela olhou a pintura distraidamente"

("She looked (gazed) at the painting absent-mindedly")


If you have any doubts, please contact us:wink:


Cristiane

Team Portuguesepod101.com

Andrew
Saturday at 7:43 am
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What's the difference in the usage between Parecer and Estar Com Uma Cara. Both are used in the context of how the person looks or how even an inanimate object looks. If you asked whether the house appeared/looked to be quiet, which would you use? Is one more popular than the other? If, during a normal conversation, you were to tell a person that they looked happy, which would you use? Would Olhar be used in this context?


Thanks,


Andrew

PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Wednesday at 9:51 am
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Oi Matthew,


Bom, você não pisou em solo brasileiro AINDA, mas espero que você visite o Brasil num futuro próximo! :sunglasses:

Você já tem algum plano de visitar o Brasil?


Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Matthew
Saturday at 1:42 pm
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Quando foi a primeira vez que você pisou em terra brasileira?


Eu nunca pisei em terra brasileira. :disappointed:

PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 10:53 am
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Hi Greg,


Thanks for the questions!

So "eu" means "I" and "tô" is the short form of "estou" that is the verb to be conjugated to the 1st person. So "estou" doesn't actually mean "I am", it'd be (I) am. You can understand who is the subject even without the pronoun and people will understand:

"Tô com dor de cabeça."

But it's very common to use the pronoun with the verb: "Eu tô com dor de cabeça." Either ways are correct.


As for your second question, we use "estar com dor de" to talk about aches in Portuguese.

Since it's a temporary feeling, we use "estar".

Probably you'll have to memorize some patterns, as this one or "Eu tenho 30 anos" - and in English we say "I am 30 years."


I hope it helps. If you still have any questions, please let me know!

Atenciosamente,

Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Greg
Saturday at 11:37 pm
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I have two questions about the second line in the dialog. First, why does he say eu, which means I, then next says to, which means I am. I seems like he would need one or the other, but both wouldn't be necessary.


He then goes on to say that he is with a small headache, "com um pouco de dor de cabeca". Could he have said "Eu tenho um pouco de dor de cabeca", I have a small headache. What determines if you say you have something, or you are with something?


thank you

PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Monday at 9:41 am
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Oi Francis,


É verdade. Na minha opinião, a maioria das pessoas trabalha pensando mais no dinheiro que na satisfação profissional.


Você gosta do seu trabalho?


Até mais!

Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101

francis
Friday at 8:41 pm
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Ola Paloma


Gosto de tralbalar mais tambem gosto de descancar.

Dinheiro pode ser um grande motivacao no como um pessoa trabalha.


Ate logo

PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Friday at 4:25 pm
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Oi Francis,


Você gosta de trabalhar?

Do you like to work?

Acho que quando gostamos do nosso trabalho, podemos trabalhar o quanto seja, e não nos cansamos.

I think that when we like our job, we can work a lot, and don't get tired.


Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101

francis
Friday at 4:00 am
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gostei isso licao mas eu acho que todo mundo precisa trabalhar demais.