Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Braden: Hello, and welcome to PortuguesePOD101.com, where we study modern Portuguese in a fun, educational format!
Sílivia: So, brush up on the Portuguese that you started learning long ago, or start learning today.
Braden: Thanks for being here with us for this lesson, Sílivia, what are we looking at in this lesson?
Camila: So Braden, please tell us what we'll be learning in this lesson.
Braden: In this lesson, we'll be learning Renting an apartment
Camila: Where does this conversation take place and who is it between?
Braden: This conversation takes place in the afternoon, at the imobiliária, corretor - seu paulo
Camila: What's the formality level?
Braden: Well, it's formal.
Camila: Let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Woman: Então, você tem fiador?
Man: Tenho sim.
Woman: Que bom. Para locar um apartamento assim, um fiador facilita muito. Ele é daqui?
Man: Sim, ele e do Rio. É meu cunhado.
Woman: Ele não é daqui de Curitiba?
Man: Não.
Woman: Ele tem imóvel aqui em Curitiba?
Man: Também não. Por que?
Woman: Por que nós não aceitamos fiadores do Rio, só de São Paulo para o sul.
Man: Por que?
Woman: Porque é norma da empresa. Você não sabia?
Man: Quando que eu iria tomar conhecimento disso, só falei contigo.
Woman: Bem, então você pode pedir um seguro fiança se você quiser.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Woman: Então, você tem fiador?
Man: Tenho sim.
Woman: Que bom. Para locar um apartamento assim, um fiador facilita muito. Ele é daqui?
Man: Sim, ele e do Rio. É meu cunhado.
Woman: Ele não é daqui de Curitiba?
Man: Não.
Woman: Ele tem imóvel aqui em Curitiba?
Man: Também não. Por que?
Woman: Por que nós não aceitamos fiadores do Rio, só de São Paulo para o sul.
Man: Por que?
Woman: Porque é norma da empresa. Você não sabia?
Man: Quando que eu iria tomar conhecimento disso, só falei contigo.
Woman: Bem, então você pode pedir um seguro fiança se você quiser.
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Woman: Então, você tem fiador?
Braden: So, do you have a guarantor?
Man: Tenho sim.
Braden: Yes, I do.
Woman: Que bom. Para locar um apartamento assim, um fiador facilita muito. Ele é daqui?
Braden: That's good. To rent an apartment like this, a guarantor facilitates things considerably. Is he from here?
Man: Sim, ele e do Rio. É meu cunhado.
Braden: Yes, he's from Rio. It's my brother-in-law.
Woman: Ele não é daqui de Curitiba?
Braden: He isn't from Curitiba?
Man: Não.
Braden: No.
Woman: Ele tem imóvel aqui em Curitiba?
Braden: Does he have property here in Curitiba?
Man: Também não. Por que?
Braden: Still no. Why?
Woman: Por que nós não aceitamos fiadores do Rio, só de São Paulo para o sul.
Braden: Because we don't accept guarantors from Rio, only from São Paulo and south.
Man: Por que?
Braden: Why?
Woman: Porque é norma da empresa. Você não sabia?
Braden: Because it's a company policy. You didn't know?
Man: Quando que eu iria tomar conhecimento disso, só falei contigo.
Braden: When would I have known about that? I've only talked to you.
Woman: Bem, então você pode pedir um seguro fiança se você quiser.
Braden: Well, you could contract some financial insurance if you'd like.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Braden: (ask --- something about the dialogue-Peter always does a little review about the previous lessons. explain what you are thinking about the storyline in the lesson, so the students can follow and participate - don't make them guess.)
---: response
Braden: I've had a lot of horror stories about renting in Brazil. In the USA we give a down payment and a security deposit and if the owner is particularly stringent, he might request a background check, but those are rare.
---: Yeah it's a lot more complicated in Brazil. Mostly because there are many dishonest people in Brazil.
Braden: Right. And even though Brazil is rapidly gaining on developed countries, Brazil still lacks a lot of the infrastructure most first world countries take for granted so it is actually quite easy for someone to rent an apartment, not pay rent for two or three month and then just disappear.
---: To protect against this we usually rent through an imobiliária or real estate agency and the imobiliária requires the specific paperwork for income, credit history, and job security, etc.
Braden: Probably the most difficult though, and the most important in the system, is the fiador. Because of the legal implications of being a fiador, people are less than willing to sign off on someone's rental agreement.
---: As you can see the system it self is qutie different and more importantly, the system differs from region to region and sometimes even from city to city. Beyond that, each imobiliária has autonomy to create new rules as they see fit.
Braden: So, be sure to ask lots questions and go through the entire process theoretically with them before hand so you don't get caught on something necessary that you as a foreigener don't have.
VOCAB LIST
Braden: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Sílivia: fiador [natural native speed]
Braden: guarantor
Sílivia: fiador [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílivia: fiador [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílivia: norma [natural native speed]
Braden: norm, standard,
Sílivia: norma [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílivia: norma [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílivia: cunhado [natural native speed]
Braden: brother-in-law
Sílivia: cunhado [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílivia: cunhado [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílivia: facilitar [natural native speed]
Braden: to facilitate, to make easy
Sílivia: facilitar [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílivia: facilitar [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílivia: sul [natural native speed]
Braden: south
Sílivia: sul [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílivia: sul [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílivia: aceitar [natural native speed]
Braden: to accept
Sílivia: aceitar [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílivia: aceitar [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílivia: imóvel [natural native speed]
Braden: building, house, apartment
Sílivia: imóvel [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílivia: imóvel [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílivia: Curitiba [natural native speed]
Braden: Curitiba
Sílivia: Curitiba [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílivia: Curitiba [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílivia: fiança [natural native speed]
Braden: guarantee
Sílivia: fiança [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílivia: fiança [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílivia: conhecimento [natural native speed]
Braden: knowledge
Sílivia: conhecimento [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílivia: conhecimento [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
---: The first phrase we'll look at is Tomar conhecimento.
Braden: tomar conhecimento literally translates to "take knowledge" but it means "to find out" or "to notice."
---: This is an older phrase and typically not used in daily conversation but used in writing. It can also be used in the negative as não tomar conhecimento to mean "to ignore, to brush aside, to dismiss, or "to fail to notice."
Braden: Could you break this down?
---: (break down)
Braden: what's our next word?
---: The next word we'll look at is fiador
Braden: fiador literally translates to "guarantor" but unless you're well versed in legal finances, you probably don't know what that means.
---: In Portuguese, a fiador is the person legally bound to pay for an item, product, or service if you do not. For example, if the renter were to rent for a few months and then disappear (something that happens frequently in Brazil) the fiador is legally obligated to pay either the remainder of the rent or pay to have the contract rescinded.
Braden: Could you break this down?
---: (break down)
Braden: what's our next word?
---: The next word we'll look at is norma
Braden: norma literally translates to "norm" but has a closer meaning to "standard," "regulation," or in the case of this dialogue "policy."
---: It's a feminine noun with and open "ó."
Braden: Could you break this down?
---: (break down)
Braden: what's our next phrase?
---: The next phrase we'll look at is seguro fiança
Braden: Seguro fiança literally translates to "finance security" or "finance guarrantee" but it refers to a company that acts as your fiador if you happen to not have a friend or family member who could be your fiador.
---: Normally you pay this company a percentage of your monthly rent (in addition to your monthly rent and condominium fees) for them to act as your fiador.

Lesson focus

Braden: So ---, what's the focus of this lesson?
---: The focus of this lesson is pronunciation tips.
---: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase Woman - Por que nós não aceitamos fiadores do Rio, só de São Paulo para o sul.
Braden: Which we translated as "Woman - Because we don't accept guarantors from Rio, only from São Paulo and south."
---: In this lesson we are going to address some important pronunciation tips that are just too small to be their own lessons.
Braden: That's right. and we're going to start off with "Nasal diphthongs." Nasal diphthongs are produced by passing the air from the lungs through the nasal cavity.
---: When nasal vowels form a diphthong with other vowels, the air must also pass through the nasal cavity.
Braden: To help you with this we have built some exercises that should help you identify how to pronouce these nasals. The following diphthongs can be produced in these ways -
---: ãe - eg., mãe;
Braden: say my, then smile
---: ão - eg., são;
Braden: say sound then drop the "d" and don't close the sound
---: õe - eg., ões;
Braden: say coins, drop the "c."
---: One quick tip is the word maracanã. Maracanã kind of tickles your nose
Braden: I didn't like saying São Paulo because it tickled but I kept doing it and eventually got used to it.
---: On to the Portuguese d &t.
Braden: The "d" and "t" in English are pronounced by tapping the tip of the tongue on the ridge immediately behind the teeth. Say the following sentence and feel where your tongue touches when you say the letters "d" and "t."
Braden: david and dotty went to the teacher to tell on Tom who was a Tattle-tale.
---: The d and t in Portuguese are pronounced by tapping the tongue on the back of the teeth.
---: o tatu mordeu o dedo do dono dele.
Braden: Can you hear how much softer the Portuguese t and d are than the English
Braden: t
---: t
Braden: d
---: d
Braden: Okay so also remember that the d can be pronounced "gee" and the t can be pronounced "chee" if they are followed by the "ee" sound (and i or a final e).
---: so quick review. 1. The portuguese d and t are pronounced by touching the back of the teeth with the tongue.
Braden: and 2. The d can be pronounced "gee" and the t can be pronounced "chee" if followed by the "ee" sound.
---: Third topic, Long vowel sounds
Braden: In the Pronunciation series, we introduced the pronunciation of the vowels in Portuguese (a, e, i, o, u). You have probably noticed when a vowel at the end of a word (ela) and a vowel at the beginning of a word (abre) and next to each other, the two vowels are slurred together without pausing between them - ela abre.
---: At native speed, adjacent vowels are run together. Because of this, when foreigners hear portuguese spoken rapidly, the words seem to run together into one.
Braden: However, the same is true when foreigners hear English spoken by natives. For example, when we say "we eat," we say it as one word. We also do this with consonants. I remember speaking with a Brazilian in English and I used the phrase "almost strong." He stopped me and said, "I know what strong is but what's "almo." I'd connected not one but two consonant sounds from two different words into one. Such is the English language.
---: Notice also that in English, "so old" is not the same as "sold." We can distinguish between "so old" and "sold" because the "o" sound of "so old" is longer than in "sold."
Braden: The same is true in Portuguese. for example, a aula is distinguished from the single word aula because the a sound in a aula is longer than the a in aula.
---: Okay so forth topic - The portuguese lh and nh
Braden: The lh in Portuguese is formed by placing the tip of the toungue at the top of the mouth behind the teeth, (same place where you just discovered your english "t"s happen) then moving the tip down to the bottom of the mouth as the back of the tongue touches the roof of the mouth. It is the same sound we form in English when we say the words "will ye"
---: Some examples are mulher and folha.
Braden: Fifth topic. the nh in portuguese. The nh in Portuguese is formed by nasalizing the preceding vowel and making a "y" sound. Note that the tongue does not touch the roof of the mouth
---: senhor and tenha.
Braden: Okay so rules, 1. to form the lh in Portuguese, put the tip of the tongue at the top of the mouth behind the teeth, then raise the back of the tongue to the roof of the mouth.
---: 2. To form the nh in Portuguese, nasalize the preceding vowel and make a "y" sound. Examples - Falha, malha, telhado, molho, senhora, aparhar, canhoto, ponho
Braden: And our tip for this lesson is one Pronunciation and spelling.
---: One of the best exercises you can do to practice your understanding of portuguese pronunciation is to listen to a word and try to spell it according to the Portuguese rules.
Braden: For that reason in these lessons, we will use many words in the podcast that we won't include in the lesson notes. Listen to the word and then try to spell it. Once you think you've got it look up your word in the dictionary and see if you are right.
---: Better yet come to the site were we have a searchable dictionary that can talk to you and give you the correct spelling and pronunciation. If you think you have it right but it isn't showing up then post a comment in the blog and we'll answer with the correct spelling. If you have any questions…
quick review at the end of the lesson - explanation of why this is useful
That just about does it for this lesson.
thanks for listening!

Outro

Braden: That just about does it for today.
Braden: Attention perfectionists! You're about to learn how to perfect your pronunciation.
Sílivia: Lesson Review Audio Tracks.
Braden: Increase fluency and vocabulary fast with these short, effective audio tracks.
Sílivia: Super simple to use. Listen to the Portuguese word or phrase...
Braden: then repeat it out loud in a loud clear voice.
Sílivia: You'll speak with confidence knowing that you're speaking Portuguese like the locals.
Braden: Go to PortuguesePod101.com, and download the Review Audio Tracks right on the lessons page today!
Braden: Thanks for listening!
Sílivia: Até mais!

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