Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Braden: Braden here. This is Intermediate Season 1, Lesson 2 - A Brazilian Promotion is a Cause for Celebration. Well, this is our second Intermediate lesson! We're moving right along, aren't we?
Silvia: That's right! Anyway, on to the lesson. Please tell us what we'll be learning in this lesson.
Braden: In this lesson, we'll be learning how to use the verbs saber and conhecer
Silvia: Where does this conversation take place and who is it between?
Braden: This conversation takes place at night, at home, and it's between Paulo and Raquel.
Silvia: What's the formality level?
Braden: Well, they're husband and wife, so it's informal.
Silvia: Let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Paulo: Desculpe a demora.
Raquel: Não tem problema eu também me atrasei. «dois beijinhos»
Raquel: Mas (...) aconteceu alguma coisa?
Paulo: Não, não. Eu demorei porque teve uma festinha lá na empresa.
Raquel: Uma festinha?
Paulo: Sim, para o Hélio. Ele foi promovido e fomos comemorar.
Raquel: Ah sim é verdade, eu soube que ele foi promovido.
Paulo: E você conhece o Hélio?
Raquel: Sim, eu o conheci na festa de natal do ano passado, lembra? «risos»
Paulo: Ah, claro que lembro.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Paulo: Desculpe a demora.
Raquel: Não tem problema eu também me atrasei. «dois beijinhos»
Raquel: Mas (...) aconteceu alguma coisa?
Paulo: Não, não. Eu demorei porque teve uma festinha lá na empresa.
Raquel: Uma festinha?
Paulo: Sim, para o Hélio. Ele foi promovido e fomos comemorar.
Raquel: Ah sim é verdade, eu soube que ele foi promovido.
Paulo: E você conhece o Hélio?
Raquel: Sim, eu o conheci na festa de natal do ano passado, lembra? «risos»
Paulo: Ah, claro que lembro.
English Host: One time fast with translation.
Paulo: Desculpe a demora.
Braden: Sorry for being late.
Raquel: Não tem problema eu também me atrasei. «dois beijinhos»
Braden: No problem. I was late too. (2 kisses)
Raquel: Mas (...) aconteceu alguma coisa?
Braden: But... did something happen?
Paulo: Não, não. Eu demorei porque teve uma festinha lá na empresa.
Braden: No, no. I got behind because there was a small party at work.
Raquel: Uma festinha?
Braden: A party?
Paulo: Sim, para o Hélio. Ele foi promovido e fomos comemorar.
Braden: Yeah, for Hélio. He was promoted and we all celebrated.
Raquel: Ah sim é verdade, eu soube que ele foi promovido.
Braden: Oh that's right. I'd heard that he was promoted.
Paulo: E você conhece o Hélio?
Braden: Have you met Hélio?
Raquel: Sim, eu o conheci na festa de natal do ano passado, lembra? «risos»
Braden: Yes, I met him at the Christmas party last year, remember?
Paulo: Ah, claro que lembro.
Braden: Oh, Of course, I remember.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Braden: What's going on in this conversation? Explain it a little bit for us.
Silvia: It seems like the husband has just arrived home late and he was excusing himself for his wife.
And he told her what was going on and she understood. She even knew that his friend from work (the coworker) was promoted and she knew him already from a Christmas party.
Braden: A question that I had, are this kind of company Christmas parties - are those common in Brazil? Do you guys do that?
Silvia: Not Christmas parties, but end year parties. And they are much fun. I used to work at ExxonMobil and they made huge parties there and it was very much fun.
VOCAB LIST
Braden: Ok. Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Sílvia: promoção [natural native speed]
Braden: promotion, offer
Sílvia: promoção [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílvia: promoção [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílvia: promovido [natural native speed]
Braden: promoted
Sílvia: promovido [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílvia: promovido [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílvia: atrasar [natural native speed]
Braden: to be late, to be made late
Sílvia: atrasar [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílvia: atrasar [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílvia: demorar [natural native speed]
Braden: to delay, to take a long time
Sílvia: demorar [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílvia: demorar [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílvia: festinha [natural native speed]
Braden: small party
Sílvia: festinha [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílvia: festinha [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílvia: comemorar [natural native speed]
Braden: to celebrate, to comemorate
Sílvia: comemorar [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílvia: comemorar [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílvia: empresa [natural native speed]
Braden: company, business
Sílvia: empresa [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílvia: empresa [natural native speed]
: Next:
Sílvia: lembrar [natural native speed]
Braden: to remember
Sílvia: lembrar [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Sílvia: lembrar [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Braden: Ok. Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Silvia: The first phrase we'll look at is desculpa a demora
Braden: And what does this mean?
Silvia: Well, desculpa a demora is how you say “Sorry for being late” in Portuguese.
Braden: Literally, it translates to “Sorry for the delay” (but the obvious inferred meaning of “by me”) could you break this down for us?
Silvia: desculpa a demora
Braden: the word demora has an "o" in it, is that "o" open or closed?
Silvia: the o is open.
Braden: So what's our next phrase?
Silvia: claro que lembro
Braden: which means?
Silvia: Well, Claro que lembro literally translates to “clear that I remember” but it means “of course I remember."
Braden: Claro is often used to mean “of course” and the que here is acting like a conjunction connecting claro and lembro.
Silvia: Right. Kind of like "it's obvious (that) I remember him."
Braden: could you break this down?
Silvia: claro que lembro
Braden: Okay, and what's our next phrase?
Silvia: eu o conheci
Braden: And what does this mean?
Silvia: Eu o conheci is an example of indirect object pronouns in Portuguese. Literally, it translates to “I him met” but it means “I met him.”
Braden: When “o” and “a” are used as indirect object pronouns, they almost always come before the verb, right?
Silvia: Right.

Lesson focus

Braden: So Silvia, what's the focus of this lesson?
Silvia: The focus of this lesson is saber and conhecer in the preterit
Braden: In the dialogue, we heard the phrase
Silvia: E você conhece o Hélio?
Braden: Which we translated as "Have you met Hélio?" Here the verb conhecer is used to mean "to met."
Silvia: That's right. Foreigners frequently have difficulty with the verbs saber and conhecer and when to use which.
Braden: Yeah, I think it's because they both translate to "to know." but they only share different parts of the verb "to know" and it's difficult to know exactly where to draw the line. Then it gets even more difficult when you conjugate them into the past tense, which is what we are going to look at in this lesson.
Silvia: So, let's start with the verb saber. The verb saber means to know factual information. It is followed by an abstract noun (e.g. a verdade, a razão) or by a sentence introduced by que (that).
Braden: could you give us some examples?
Silvia: Sure one example would be Eu soube que você é de Maranhão.
Braden: Which we translated as "I found out that you are from Maranhão."
Silvia: Right. This is a simple example where saber translates to "found out." Another maybe better example, would be Você soube quem é seu vizinho?
Braden: Ah, good one. This has two meanings depending on the tone of voice.
Silvia: Right if you say it wit ha tone of disbelief Você soube quem é seu vizinho? then it means "You knew who your neighbor was? with a tone of "how is that possible?" but if you say it Você soube quem é seu vizinho? with a guess what "guess what" kind of tone
Braden: then it means "Did you know who your neighbor is?" as if he were a celebrity.
Silvia: And one last example would be Alex soube da mudança?
Braden: this one has two possible translations as well. the first is "Alex knew about the change?" and the second is "Did Alex know about the change?"
Silvia: Next we'll move on to the verb conhecer in the preterit. In the preterit, the verb saber means "found out," while the ver conhecer means "met" or "became acquainted with."
Braden: Could you give us some examples?
Silvia: Sure. Ele conheceu o President ontem à noite.
Braden: Which translates to "He met the President last night." isn't that nice.
Silvia: ha! When you're talking about people it's not so complicated but let's do an example with Rio. You can't really meet a city in English, can you?
Braden: No, not really.
Silvia: So, another example is - Elas conheceram o Rio na viagem.
Braden: Ah! which translates to "They became acquainted with Rio on the trip."
Silvia: Or more naturally "They went to Rio for the first time on the trip."
Braden: right. Okay so for contrast, how about one more example for saber in the preterit?
Silvia: ummm.... how about A funcionária soube ontem que aquele formulário é necessário?
Braden: Good one. Which translates to "The employee found out yesterday that that form is necessary?" or better, "Yesterday, did the employee know that form is necessary?"
Silvia: Okay so our tip for this lesson is the phrase "did you know that?"
Braden: That should ring some bells for the Bill Nye generation, like me. Anyway, like we said before, saber can often be translated as "knew" or "found out." But to say the phrase "Did you know that..." you have to use the verb saber in the pretérito impefeito or imperfect tense
Silvia: Which would be "você sabia que..." not "você soube que"
Braden: So to ask, "Did you know that sarah is form Washington?" you would say
Silvia: Você sabia que sarah é de Washington?"
Braden: Excellent. Okay, so quick review, saber in the preterit tense translates typically translates to "found out" but conhecer in the preterit tense typically translates to "met" or became acquainted with."
Silvia: perfect.
Braden: well that just about does it for today. Thanks for listening!

Outro

Braden: That just about does it for today.
Sílvia: Want a free way to build your Portuguese vocabulary?
Braden: Follow our Portuguese Word of the Day at Portuguese.com!
Sílvia: See and hear the word of the day...
Braden: ...plus sample phrases and sentences!
Sílvia: Get these daily vocabulary alerts on Facebook, Twitter, and the PortuguesePod/Class.com Blog!
Braden: And add this widget to your own website or blog! They're available in 35 languages.
Sílvia: Get these easy instructions at Portuguese.com/Portuguese-phrases
Braden: Tchau pra vocês!
Sílvia: Tenha um ótimo dia!

11 Comments

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PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 6:30 pm
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O que significa "Alemanha"?

PortuguesePod101.com
Wednesday at 2:40 am
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Hi Zhuldyzay,


"Desculpe a demora." is frequently used in casual conversations, so it could be considered as a set phrase meaning "Sorry for the wait.".


It is more common to address someone with "você" ("you") instead of "tu" in Brazil (except for the South of Brazil that uses more "tu"). Hence, the use of "Desculpe", the imperative form of the verb "desculpar" ("to excuse" / "to apologize") for the person of speech "você".


Hope this helps! For more details, please check out our http://www.PortuguesePod101.com/myteacher


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Zhuldyzay
Saturday at 10:07 pm
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Hello


I have two questions


1) what means "a" in the frase " Desculpe a demora.", why we have ti use this 'a' in the frase

2) why it is written the forms of verbs for "eu, tu, ele, ela, voce...", menawhile forms for "tu" is not used in brazil

PortuguesePod101.com
Sunday at 4:17 am
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Olá Kyle,


Thank you for posting.


In "Eu o conheci.", "o" is a direct object. The verb "conhecer" (in this case meaning "to meet") requires a complement which is a direct object.


Please check out these lessons for more details about this grammar point:

https://www.portuguesepod101.com/lesson/lower-intermediate-16-go-to-sleep-before-the-brazilian-boogieman-gets-you/

https://www.portuguesepod101.com/lesson/lower-intermediate-20-have-you-heard-the-brazilian-tale-of-the-headless-mule/


Hope this helps! Feel free to let us know if you have any further questions.


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Kyle
Sunday at 12:59 am
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Can you please explain why 'o' in "Eu o conheci" is considered an indirect object rather than a direct object? I think I am confused because the direct object is used in "Prazer, em conhecê-lo", right? Obrigado.



Portuguesepod101.com 
Monday at 8:32 pm
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Hello Andrew,


Thanks for posting.


Both “desculpa” and “desculpe” are the imperative form of the verb “desculpar” (to excuse or to apologize). “Desculpa” is conjugated for use with the 2nd. person singular “tu” in Portuguese and “desculpe”, for use with the 3rd. person singular “você”.


For example:

“Desculpa, estou super atrasado. Esperaste muito?” (I’m sorry, I’m so late! Did you wait too long?) – but you’ll notice that the “tu” conjugation is not very used by Brazilians (that is “esperaste”, referring to the verb “to wait”); but maybe you’ll hear this in the south of Brazil.


“Desculpe, estou super atrasado. Você esperou muito?” (I’m sorry, I’m so late! Did you wait too long?) .


Important! Many speakers use “desculpa” even when the conjugation is referred to the the 3rd. person singular “você”. This is a very common informal way of speaking :wink:



Cristiane

Team Portuguesepod101.com

Andrew
Monday at 2:41 am
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Oi Paloma e Braden,


Tudo Bem? Eu tenho uma pergunta se isso esta OK contigo. O que e a diferenca entre desculpa e desculpe? Voce usar ou fala "DesculpA a demora" ou "DesculpE a demora" para "Sorry for being late." Pelo jeito, Eu aproveito suas licoes muito! Trabalho otimo os caras! :)


Obrigado!


Andrew

Braden
Tuesday at 10:23 pm
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@Karis


Exactly! Whenever there is an accent mark it overrides pretty much any other pronunciation.


Ex. de = of/from – (preposition) usually pronounced like the English 'g'.

dê = give(s) - (present subjunctive - (that) I/he/she give(s)) - the pronunciation is similar to the pronunciation of "day."*


*Pronunciation tip, "day" is a diphthong (two vowel sounds-'a' & 'y') and dê is only one sound (ê). They are very similar to the ears of an English speaker but if you ask a Brazilian, they are quite different.


Did that answer your question?

Karis Thain
Tuesday at 8:28 pm
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Would I also be correct to say that if there's a circumflex on the e (ê) you pronounce the sound like a hard D/English speaking D....

azeite de dendê for example... the ending of the word is pronouced like the English word 'day'

Braden
Tuesday at 6:06 am
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Hey Rob!

Thanks for commenting and great question!


The quick tip is that when "de" ends a word (verdade, bondade, de) then it gets the soft "d" or "g" sound.


If it's anywhere else in the word, it's probably a hard "d" sound. (demora, desesperar, debater) Remember to touch your teeth with your tongue.


What makes it crazy though, is that in both Brazilian and European Portuguese it completely depends on the accent. In Brazil, the southern states (Rio Grande do Sul and Santa Catarina) almost always use a "de" that's very similar to the Spanish "de." From about Paraná up to Bahia, you get the soft "de" (g) sound. Then in the nordeste you get a hard "de" but instead of a Spanish sound, you get a "di" sound, almost like the English "D." And of course, there's every random combination you can possibly think of among the 200 million Brazilians. Portugal has the same kind of "de" vs. "g" differences but only in very specific cities and regions.


Did that help a bit?

Rob
Monday at 4:44 am
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I am really confused about when a "d" in front of an "e" is pronounced somewhat like a hard english "d" - as in "dead" and when it is pronounced very softly - more like a "g" or "j".


This lesson is an example "demora" is pronounced with a hard d

But the second d in "verdade" has a very soft sound.


My first steps in Portuguese have been in European portuguese and so this makes it all the more confusing since all "d"s are hard.