Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Eric: Hi everyone, I’m Eric.
Felipe: And I’m Felipe!
Eric: And welcome to Culture Class: Essential Brazilian Portuguese Vocabulary, Lesson 19! In this lesson you'll learn five essential words related to people and homes. These are five common types of places to live in Brazil. Hand picked. You can find a complete list of vocabulary at PortuguesePod101.com.

Lesson focus

Eric: Felipe, what’s our first word?
Felipe: favela
Eric: slum
Felipe: (slow) favela (regular) favela
Eric: Listeners, please repeat:
Felipe: favela
[pause - 5 sec.]
Eric: Slums have irregular housing with a lack of basic infrastructure and can be found in urban areas of Brazil. They first appeared in Rio de Janeiro's mountains, where they have since become a major attraction for foreigners.
Eric: Now let's hear a sample sentence using this word.
Felipe: (normal) Muitos filmes brasileiros mostram como é a vida na favela.
Eric: Many Brazilian movies show how life is in the slum.
Felipe: (slow) Muitos filmes brasileiros mostram como é a vida na favela.
Eric: Okay, what’s the next word?
Felipe: casa de pau-a-pique
Eric: wattle and daub house
Felipe: (slow) casa de pau-a-pique (regular) casa de pau-a-pique
Eric: Listeners, please repeat:
Felipe: casa de pau-a-pique
[pause - 5 sec.]
Eric: Wattle and daub houses are made of wood slat and a clay mixture. The roof is usually made of straw from local palm trees. The building technique was introduced to Brazil by the Portuguese and is used in poorer areas, the countryside, or in the backcountry.
Eric: Now let's hear a sample sentence using this word.
Felipe: (normal) As casas de pau-a-pique não costumam durar muito tempo, mas são bem baratas de construir.
Eric: Wattle and daub houses don't usually last long but are very cheap to build.
Felipe: (slow) As casas de pau-a-pique não costumam durar muito tempo, mas são bem baratas de construir.
Eric: Okay, what’s the next word?
Felipe: sítio
Eric: farm
Felipe: (slow) sítio (regular) sítio
Eric: Listeners, please repeat:
Felipe: sítio
[pause - 5 sec.]
Eric: Sítio are small farms in the countryside. They can be leisure or farming houses for people who live in the city, but some people prefer to live there as well.
Eric: Now let's hear a sample sentence using this word.
Felipe: (normal) Muitas pessoas que tem um sítio mas não moram lá têm caseiro.
Eric: Many people who have a farm but don't live there have a caretaker.
Felipe: (slow) Muitas pessoas que tem um sítio mas não moram lá têm caseiro.
Eric: Okay, what’s the next word?
Felipe: sobrado
Eric: two-story house
Felipe: (slow) sobrado (regular) sobrado
Eric: Listeners, please repeat:
Felipe: sobrado
[pause - 5 sec.]
Eric: Today the word “sobrado” refers to a two-story house where one family lives. In the colonial period, the rich people who lived in cities lived in a sobrado.
Eric: Now let's hear a sample sentence using this word.
Felipe: (normal) Num sobrado, normalmente a cozinha, sala de estar e lavabo ficam no andar de baixo, e os quartos e banheiros no de cima.
Eric: In a two-story house, usually the kitchen, living room, and a toilet are downstairs, and rooms and bathrooms are upstairs.
Felipe: (slow) Num sobrado, normalmente a cozinha, sala de estar e lavabo ficam no andar de baixo, e os quartos e banheiros no de cima.
Eric: Okay, what’s the last word?
Felipe: oca
Eric: Indigenous house
Felipe: (slow) oca (regular) oca
Eric: Listeners, please repeat:
Felipe: oca
[pause - 5 sec.]
Eric: An oca is usually very large, made of wood and bamboo, and covered with straw or palm leaves. It's built with the help of everyone in the tribe, and is a dwelling in which many families live together.
Eric: Now let's hear a sample sentence using this word.
Felipe: (normal) Os índios colocam redes dentro da oca para dormir.
Eric: The Indians put hammocks inside the oca to sleep.
Felipe: (slow) Os índios colocam redes dentro da oca para dormir.
QUIZ
Eric: Okay, listeners, are you ready to be quizzed on the words you just learned? Felipe will give you the Portuguese – please say the English meaning out loud! Are you ready?
Felipe: favela
[pause]Eric: slum
Felipe: casa de pau-a-pique
[pause]Eric: wattle and daub house
Felipe: sítio
[pause]Eric: farm
Felipe: sobrado
[pause]Eric: two-story house
Felipe: oca
[pause]Eric: Indigenous house

Outro

Eric: There you have it – five types of places to live in Brazil! We have more vocab lists available at PortuguesePod101.com, so be sure to check them out. Thanks, everyone, see you next time!
Felipe: Tchau.

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Where would you like to stay when you arrive in Brazil?