Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Braden: Hello, and welcome back to Basic Bootcamp Season 1 lesson 4 – Counting 1-20 in Portuguese.
Thássia: This five-part series will help you ease your way into Portuguese.
Braden: We'll go over all the basics that will really help you understand Portuguese much quicker.
Thássia: And with a lot less grief and heartache…
Braden: Have you been watching those Portuguese novellas again? Sheesh… (laughter). Anyway, we'll have fun doing it!
Thássia: Yeah, it'll be fun!
Braden: In this lesson, you will learn one of the essentials in Portuguese…
Thássia: Numbers! In this lesson, we will learn to count from one to twenty.
Braden: Wow, that's a lot of numbers. I thought you said we'll do this without a lot of "grief and heartache."
Thássia: Oh, it's not that hard, so don't worry! Of course, this will be painless, because Portuguese numbers are pretty simple.
Braden: It's all based on patterns.
Thássia: That's right! Once you learn one through twenty, then everything else will fall into place!
Braden: That's right! How easy is that? So, our conversation this time around is a bit different.
Thássia: Yes, this time it’s more of a monologue, since there’s only one person.
Braden: Here, Camilla is playing hide-and-seek with her friends, and she’s the one doing the counting.
Thássia: Let’s take a listen.
DIALOGUE
Camilla: Um, dois, três, quatro, cinco, seis, sete, oito, nove, dez, onze, doze, treze, catorze, quinze, dezesseis, dezessete, dezoito, dezenove, vinte.
Braden: Let’s hear it’s again, slowly this time.
Thássia: Ouvir novamente mas devagar agora.
Camilla: Um, dois, três, quatro, cinco, seis, sete, oito, nove, dez, onze, doze, treze, catorze, quinze, dezesseis, dezessete, dezoito, dezenove, vinte.
Braden: And now with the translation.
Thássia: E agora com tradução.
Camilla: Um, dois, três, quatro, cinco, seis, sete, oito, nove, dez, onze, doze, treze, catorze, quinze, dezesseis, dezessete, dezoito, dezenove, vinte.
Braden: One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten, eleven, twelve, thirteen, fourteen, fifteen, sixteen, seventeen, eighteen, nineteen, twenty.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Braden: Hey, there we go. There are some patterns in there. Did you hear them?
Thássia: If not, don't worry, we'll explain them to you in a little bit.
Braden: You'll have them down in no time. Let’s take a look at the vocabulary of this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Thássia: um (or uma) [natural native speed]
Braden: one (1), a
Thássia: um (or uma) [[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: um (or uma) [[natural native speed]
Braden: Next we have...
Thássia: dois (or duas) [natural native speed]
Braden: two (2)
Thássia: dois (or duas) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: dois (or duas) [natural native speed]
Braden: Next we have...
Thássia: três [natural native speed]
Braden: three (3)
Thássia: três [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: três [natural native speed]
Braden: Next we have...
Thássia: quatro [natural native speed]
Braden: four (4)
Thássia: quatro [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: quatro [natural native speed]
Braden: Next we have...
Thássia: cinco [natural native speed]
Braden: five (5)
Thássia: cinco [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: cinco [natural native speed]
Braden: Next we have...
Thássia: seis [natural native speed]
Braden: six (6)
Thássia: seis [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: seis [natural native speed]
Braden: Next we have...
Thássia: sete [natural native speed]
Braden: seven (7)
Thássia: sete [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: sete [natural native speed]
Braden: Next we have...
Thássia: oito [natural native speed]
Braden: eight (8)
Thássia: oito [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: oito [natural native speed]
Braden: Next we have...
Thássia: nove [natural native speed]
Braden: nine (9)
Thássia: nove [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: nove [natural native speed]
Braden: Next we have...
Thássia: dez [natural native speed]
Braden: ten (10)
Thássia: dez [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: dez [natural native speed]
Braden: Next we have...
Thássia: onze [natural native speed]
Braden: eleven (11)
Thássia: onze [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: onze [natural native speed]
Braden: Next we have...
Thássia: doze [natural native speed]
Braden: twelve (12)
Thássia: doze [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: doze [natural native speed]
Braden: Next we have...
Thássia: treze [natural native speed]
Braden: thirteen (13)
Thássia: treze [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: treze [natural native speed]
Braden: Next we have...
Thássia: quatorze [natural native speed]
Braden: fourteen (14)
Thássia: quatorze [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: quatorze [natural native speed]
Braden: Next we have...
Thássia: quinze [natural native speed]
Braden: fifteen (15)
Thássia: quinze [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: quinze [natural native speed]
Braden: Next we have...
Thássia: dezesete [natural native speed]
Braden: seventeen (17)
Thássia: dezesete [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: dezesete [natural native speed]
Braden: Next we have...
Thássia: dezesseis [natural native speed]
Braden: sixteen (16)
Thássia: dezesseis [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: dezesseis [natural native speed]
Braden: Next we have...
Thássia: dezoito [natural native speed]
Braden: eighteen (18)
Thássia: dezoito [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: dezoito [natural native speed]
Braden: Next we have...
Thássia: dezenove [natural native speed]
Braden: nineteen (19)
Thássia: dezenove [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: dezenove [natural native speed]
Braden: And the last word is…
Thássia: vinte [natural native speed]
Braden: twenty (20)
Thássia: vinte [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: vinte [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Braden: Okay. So let’s take a look at the numbers here. We’ll go through 1 through 20. So here is what we want you to do. No matter where you are, no matter if you're at home, on the subway, in your car, wherever… we want you to talk to yourself. You might get some weird looks, but don't worry. It's for a good cause!
Thássia: First, Braden will say the number in English.
Braden: Then Thássia will say the number in Portuguese.
Thássia: Then you will repeat the Portuguese number. Don't worry, we'll give you some time to say it.
Braden: Everybody ready? Then let's get started!
Braden: one (1)
Thássia: um (or uma)
Braden: two (2)
Thássia: dois (or duas)
Braden: three (3)
Thássia: três
Braden: four (4)
Thássia: quatro
Braden: five (5)
Thássia: cinco
Braden: six (6)
Thássia: seis
Braden: seven (7)
Thássia: sete
Braden: eight (8)
Thássia: oito
Braden: nine (9)
Thássia: nove
Braden: ten (10)
Thássia: dez
Braden: eleven (11)
Thássia: onze
Braden: twelve (12)
Thássia: doze
Braden: thirteen (13)
Thássia: treze
Braden: fourteen (14)
Thássia: quatorze
Braden: fifteen (15)
Thássia: quinze
Braden: sixteen (16)
Thássia: dezesseis
Braden: seventeen (17)
Thássia: dezesete
Braden: eighteen (18)
Thássia: dezoito
Braden: nineteen (19)
Thássia: dezenove
Braden: twenty (20)
Thássia: vinte
Thássia: See! That wasn't so bad!
Braden: You're right! So what about these patterns were you talking about?
Thássia: Well the patterns are pretty simple and they start at sixteen.
Braden: Right, and they follow similar patterns to English.
Thássia: Right.
Braden: In English, we say twenty-one, twenty-two, etc. In Portuguese, they do the same thing, but with "and" inserted between the numbers.
Thássia: Exactly. So instead of twenty-three, you say "twenty and three," which is vinte e três.
Braden: This pattern of inserting "and"…
Thássia: …which is e in Portuguese…
Braden: …extends throughout the entire numbering system.
Thássia: Yes, it does. 34,567 in Portuguese is - trinta e quatro mil quinhentos e sessenta e sete.
Braden: So, how does counting things work?
Thássia: Same as English. Just the number, then the item. Um homem.
Braden: Which means ”One man."
Thássia: Dois sapatos.
Braden: "Two shoes."
Thássia: Três computadores.
Braden: "Three computers."

Lesson focus

Braden: Is that everything?
Thássia: Not quite.
Braden: What are we forgetting?
Thássia: Gender.
Braden: Ah, yes. Gender is really pretty simple, but since it is a strange concept to native English speakers, sometimes it can be a bit complicated and difficult to understand.
Thássia: That's why we dedicated an entire lesson to it in our Absolute Beginner series.
Braden: Exactly. So, in this lesson we are showing you a slight exception to the Portuguese numbering system. Could you explain it?
Thássia: Yes. Because of grammatical gender, the number one and the number two have two forms. We've already learned "um." That is the masculine form. The feminine form is "uma."
Braden: They both mean "one," but if you are talking about "one man," then it's…
Thássia: Um homen.
Braden: And if you are talking about "one woman," then it’s…
Thássia: Uma mulher.
Braden: Did you see how that changed?
Thássia: Um Homen - Uma Mulher. There is a similar difference when you use the number two.
Braden: Right. If you want to say "two men"…
Thássia: Then you say "Dois homens."
Braden: But if you want to say "two women"…
Thássia: Then you say "Duas mulheres."
Braden: Hey! That changed just about everything in the sentence!
Thássia: Yeah, we'll explain all of that in a later lesson. For now, let's just focus on the
numbers.
Braden: Good idea. So, both "um" and "uma" mean "one."
Thássia: Right. It's just a gender thing.
Braden: Okay. And both "dois" and "duas" mean "two."
Thássia: Yes. Grammatical gender doesn't alter the meaning of the numbers, just the way you say them.
Braden: Cool. That's pretty easy.
Thássia: That was a great lesson and we learned a lot.
Braden: Yes we did. And remember, the more you use numbers the more comfortable you'll be with them.
Thássia: So try it out! See you next time for more Basic Bootcamp!

Outro

Thássia: So, stop by PortuguesePod101.com and pick up the lesson notes.
Braden: It has the conversation transcript
Thássia: vocab, sample sentences, a grammar explanation
Braden: and a cultural insight section.
Thássia: Seeing the Portuguese really helps make the information stick.
Braden: But don't take our word for it, please have a look for yourself!
Thássia: Please let us know what you think! Tchau! Thanks for listening. Bye!
Braden: Bye!

Grammar

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14 Comments

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PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 6:30 pm
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That's a lot of numbers! But now you can count to twenty quickly and easily!

Any good tips for memorizing numbers?

Portuguesepod101.comVerified
Monday at 9:35 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Olá Darren,


De nada!

You're welcome :wink:


Feel free to let us know if you have any questions.


Cristiane

Team Portuguesepod101.com

Darren M.
Monday at 12:31 pm
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Obrigado Cristiane!

Portuguesepod101.comVerified
Monday at 3:56 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Darren


Thanks for posting.


The pronunciation varies a little according to the Brazilian region, that is: in Southeast the accent is a bit different from Northeast's for example.


But for a standard pronunciation, please check out our Portuguese dictionary:

https://www.portuguesepod101.com/portuguese-dictionary/


There's also a pronunciation series to help you out in your learning:

https://www.portuguesepod101.com/index.php?cat=26


Now, "sete", here in São Paulo the pronunciation is like the one you'll find in our dictionary (sé - tchi);

For "dezenove", we say it like "dji-ze-no-vi", but the pronunciation you'll find in our dictionary is the standard one and can be used ok ;)


Let us know if you have more questions. ;)


Cristiane

Team Portuguesepod101.com

Darren M.
Saturday at 12:02 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

The number 7 always confuses me. Is it pronounced like sietchy or siety? Is there a ~ch or ~ty sound at the end of it? Also, is 19 pronounced deze novi or is it de novi? Obrigado!

PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Friday at 6:41 pm
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Olá Todd!


Tudo bem?


Thanks for posting.


We have this way of pronouncing "t" like "ch" sometimes, but you'll get used to it. For a detailed explanation of consonants pronunciation, please check out this lessons:

https://www.portuguesepod101.com/index.php?cat=26

https://www.portuguesepod101.com/2010/10/26/all-about-4-portuguese-pronunciation-made-easy/


If you need any help, please let us know :wink:


Cristiane

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Todd
Friday at 12:04 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi, Thanks for the great lessons.

Can you explain how to know what way to pronounce the letter t.

For example in the word dezessete the t sounds like ch.

In dezoito it sounds like a t.


Thank you,

Todd

PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Thursday at 3:22 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello Vladimir,


Thank you very much for your comment! Your suggestion was very helpful, the typo in the vocabulary section and also in the PDF is now fixed.


Let us know if you have any questions.


Cheers,

Stan

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Portuguesepod101.comVerified
Sunday at 5:38 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Olhá Vladimir


Thanks for the remark. Our team will fix it asap :wink:

Your Portuguese is good, keep studying and you'll improve even more. You can use the word "erro" (mistake) instead of "falha" (failure/error) in case of reporting a mistyping.


If you have any doubts, please let us know.


Cristiane

Team Portuguesepod101.com

Vladimir
Sunday at 12:14 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Oi


Tem uma galha no "Vocabulary -> Expansion" a palavra "dezesete".

O 's' está perdido. Deve ser o "dezessete".


There is a typo in Vocabulary -> Expansion in the word "dezesete".

Just a 's' letter is missed. There should be "dezessete".


P.S. I'm sorry if you find some mistakes in my Portuguese sentences, These are my first sentences in Portuguese :)


Obrigado,

Vladimir

PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 6:14 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Oi Judy,


Okay, nice questions!

So, in the number 7, you heard the difference of the "open" E sound :smile: That's the correct intonation and pronunciation you sound use.

As for "cachorro" and "cão", this is one of the differences between Brazil and Portugal. In Brazil, we call 'dog' cachorro. But in Portugal they say cão to "dog" and cachorro to "puppy".


A little confusing, right?

I hope it helps a little!

Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101.com