Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Braden: Hello, and welcome back to the PortuguesePod101.com , the fastest, easiest and most fun way to learn Portuguese! I'm joined in the studio by...
Thássia: Hello everyone. Thássia here.
Thássia: What are we going to learn in this lesson?
Braden: In this lesson you'll learn how to use prepositions in Portuguese.
Thássia: Where does this conversation take place and who is it between?
Braden: The conversation takes place at night in front of the supermarket and it's between Tiago, Michael, Renata, and a woman on the street.
Thássia: The speakers are friends, therefore they'll be speaking informally to each other but the lady on the street is older than them so they will address her respectfully.
DIALOGUE
Tiago: Droga! O supermercado tá fechado.
Michael: Não tem um outro perto daqui?
Tiago: Não sei. Não conheço este bairro.
Renata: Vamos perguntar àquela mulher ali.
Tiago: Vamos lá.
Renata: Com licença, a senhora sabe dizer onde tem outro supermercado por aqui?
Senhora: Sei sim. Segue em frente e dobra na terceira rua à esquerda. O supermercado fica na sua direita.
Renata: Obrigada!
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Tiago: Droga! O supermercado tá fechado.
Michael: Não tem um outro perto daqui?
Tiago: Não sei. Não conheço este bairro.
Renata: Vamos perguntar àquela mulher ali.
Tiago: Vamos lá.
Renata: Com licença, a senhora sabe dizer onde tem outro supermercado por aqui?
Senhora: Sei sim. Segue em frente e dobra na terceira rua à esquerda. O supermercado fica na sua direita.
Renata: Obrigada!
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Tiago: Droga! O supermercado tá fechado.
Braden: Man! The supermarket is closed.
Michael: Não tem um outro perto daqui?
Braden: Isn't there another one near here?
Tiago: Não sei. Não conheço este bairro.
Braden: I don't know. I’m unfamiliar with this neighborhood.
Renata: Vamos perguntar àquela mulher ali.
Braden: Let's ask that woman there.
Tiago: Vamos lá.
Braden: Go for it.
Renata: Com licença, a senhora sabe dizer onde tem outro supermercado por aqui?
Braden: Excuse me ma'am, could you tell us where there is another supermarket around here?
Senhora: Sei sim. Segue em frente e dobra na terceira rua à esquerda. O supermercado fica na sua direita.
Braden: Yes, I do. Go straight and turn left at the third road. The supermarket is on your right.
Renata: Obrigada!
Braden: Thank you!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Braden: So what did they do in the dialogue?
Thássia: They talked to that lady. In Brazil, when you stop people in the street to talkt to them in this way we call it "abordar."
Braden: Brazilians are usually very nice and very positive and if you are in a situation like these three were, don’t be afraid to ask for directions.
Thássia: This is very normal in Brazil and we won’t think you’re crazy.
Braden: But do be careful because the person you’re talking to might not actually know the area very well. I've been lost and gotten more lost because I followed someone elses directions.
Thássia: It is also very important to use the phrase “com licença” which means “excuse me” when approaching someone on the street.
Braden: It makes everyone feel more relaxed. Muggings are sadly common in Brazil so helping everyone feel relaxed is always a good idea.
Thássia: Yes it is.
VOCAB LIST
Braden: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Thássia: com [natural native speed]
Braden: with
Thássia: com [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: com [natural native speed]
: Next:
Thássia: de [natural native speed]
Braden: of, from
Thássia: de [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: de [natural native speed]
: Next:
Thássia: entre [natural native speed]
Braden: between
Thássia: entre [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: entre [natural native speed]
: Next:
Thássia: para [natural native speed]
Braden: to, for
Thássia: para [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: para [natural native speed]
: Next:
Thássia: sem [natural native speed]
Braden: without
Thássia: sem [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: sem [natural native speed]
: Next:
Thássia: a [natural native speed]
Braden: to
Thássia: a [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: a [natural native speed]
: Next:
Thássia: desde [natural native speed]
Braden: since
Thássia: desde [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: desde [natural native speed]
: Next:
Thássia: frente [natural native speed]
Braden: front
Thássia: frente [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: frente [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Thássia: The first word we’ll look at is “droga!”
Braden: “Droga!” literally means “drug,” but it is an exclamation that’s used in the same way as… let's keep this G-rated. Like “Shoot!” or “Man!”
Thássia: This exclamation is frequently used in everyday Portuguese, but it’s not used in formal conversations.
Braden: The next phrase we’ll look at is “vai lá.”
Thássia: In the dialogue, Thiago used the phrase “vai lá” which literally translates to “go there,” to mean “go ahead” or “go for it.”
Braden: This a good way to show support or to encourage someone and you'll here it all the time.
Thássia: Tone of voice is important here too. Remember to have a positive voice tone to motivate who you're encouraging.
Braden: What's our last phrase?
Thássia: The last phrases we're going to look at is “segue em frente” and “sempre em frente”
Braden: Literally these translate to “follow in front” and “always in front."
Thássia: But they both mean “go straight ahead” or “go along this street.”
Braden: You will probably hear either of these phrases when asking directions.

Lesson focus

Braden: Thássia, what is the focus of this lesson?
Thássia: The focus of this lesson is prepositions and prepositional phrases.
Braden: We heard the phrase
Thássia: "Seque em frente e dobra na terceira rua à esquerda." in the dialogue
Braden: Which we translated as "Go straight and turn to the left on third street"
Thássia: This sentence has several prepositions but we are going to focus on the "em" in "segue em frente"
Braden: Okay so, prepositions are words that describe how all the other words in a sentence relate to each other. They may show location like "in Arizona," possession as in "of Michael," time as in (at six), manner like (by car), agent like (by Renata), or any number of other relationships.
Thássia: There are many prepositions in Portuguese, just like English. Some of the more common ones are "de" which we talked about before and means "of" or "from,"
Braden: "em" which can mean "either" "in," "on," or "at,"
Thássia: "com" which means "with"
Braden: "para" which means "to" or "for"
Thássia: "Por" which means "for," "by" or "to"
Braden: and "sobre" which means "above" or "about."
Thássia: Prepositions are usually part of prepositional phrases. “At school” is called a prepositional phrase.
Braden: A prepositional phrase is made up of two parts
Thássia: Some other examples are "em frente" which translates to "in front". You have the preposition "em" followed by the noun "frente".
Braden: Or the phrase "à esquerda" which means “to the left.” In this case, the preposition "a" has been contracted with the article "a." This starts the prepositional phrase which then ends with "esquerda" which means left.
Thássia: And a quick tip is that some verbs always have specific prepositions attached to them. Like "gostar" which means "to like" always needs “de”.
Braden: And "precisar" which means "to need". When followed by a noun, "precisar" needs the preposition “de”. When followed by a verb, only the verb in its infinitive form is necessary.
Thássia: For example, "Eu gosto de chocolate.", which means:
Braden: "I like chocolate."
Thássia: And "Eu preciso de um lápis.", which means:
Braden: "I need a pencil.
Braden: Notice also that these two phrases, the English doesn't have the preposition present. We don't say, in English, "I like of chocolate.", but if you were to translate word by word in Portuguese, it would be: "I like of Portuguese.". Makes sense?
Thássia: Prepositions are very important because they show how words relate to each other.
Braden: And it's those relationships that bring the correct meaning to what you are trying to say. For example, "the book is on the table"...
Thássia: Yeah, yeah, the most common phrase in English for us, Portuguese speakers!
Braden: There was a song several years ago that was just this phrase repeated
at least...
Thássia: The book is on the table, table, table...
Braden: A million times...It's quite entertaining actually, for me...Anyway, this phrase "The book is on the table." has a completely different meaning from "The book IS the table.". You can't just remove the word "on" so easily. That preposition creates a relationship that is necessary. And all I did was
just remove "on". "The book is on the table.", "The book IS the table.". See how the meaning is so dramatically different? OK, so we didn't have time to go through all the of verbs and all of the prepositions that Portuguese has because there are a lot of them, but we made a list and we put it in the Lesson Notes. So go check those out, you've got a ton of extra examples. That just about does it for today!

Outro

Thássia: Want to make the vocab words from these lessons tick?
Braden: Check out the vocabulary list provided with each lesson. Available to Premium members.
Thássia: Click on any word to automatically add it to your Word Bank.
Braden: Words added to your Word Bank can be made into Flashcards used to quiz yourself.
Thássia: Give it a try at PortuguesePod101.com.
Braden: That's gonna do it!
Thássia: Até mais!
Braden: Thanks for listening today and we'll see you later!
Thássia: Tchau!

3 Comments

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PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Have you ever needed to find something in Portuguese?

PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 12:56 AM
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Oi Anna,


That's right, in some places (for example Rio de Janeiro) people use the verb "dobrar" instead of "virar" to mean "to turn".

In São Paulo, for example, people tend to use "virar".


So both ways are correct, so you can also use the one you prefer. :smile:


Hope it helps!

Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Anna
Saturday at 02:43 AM
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Ola!

"Dobra" quer dizer "Vire"? E a mesma coisa?


Obrigada!