Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Braden: Hello, and welcome to PortuguesePOD101.com, where we study modern Portuguese in a fun, educational format!
Thássia: So, brush up on the Portuguese that you started learning long ago, or start learning today.
Braden: Thanks for being here with us for this lesson, Thássia, what are we looking at in this lesson?
Braden: So Thássia, what are we going to learn in this lesson?
Thássia: In this lesson we'll learn about some of the differences between European Portuguese and Brazilian Portuguese
Braden: Where does this conversation take place?
Thássia: The conversation takes place in the afternoon At Michael's apartment and it's between Tiago &Michael.
Braden: The speakers are friends, therefore they'll be speaking informally. Let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Michael: O que vamos fazer agora?
Tiago: Eu queria passar na casa da Carla para conversar com ela sobre a festa de aniversário da Renata.
Michael: Ótima ideia!
Tiago: A gente vai lá.
Michael: Agente? Qual agente? Um agente do governo? Ela tá com algum problema?
Tiago: Haha! “A gente” significa nós! É a mesma coisa.
Michael: Tenho certeza que eu não sou agente algum.
Tiago: Não! A... Gente. separado. É o jeito que falamos.
Michael: Que expressão estranha.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Michael: O que vamos fazer agora?
Tiago: Eu queria passar na casa da Carla para conversar com ela sobre a festa de aniversário da Renata.
Michael: Ótima ideia!
Tiago: A gente vai lá.
Michael: Agente? Qual agente? Um agente do governo? Ela tá com algum problema?
Tiago: Haha! “A gente” significa nós! É a mesma coisa.
Michael: Tenho certeza que eu não sou agente algum.
Tiago: Não! A... Gente. separado. É o jeito que falamos.
Michael: Que expressão estranha.
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Michael: O que vamos fazer agora?
Braden: What are we going to do now?
Tiago: Eu queria passar na casa da Carla para conversar com ela sobre a festa de aniversário da Renata.
Braden: I wanted to go by Carla's house to talk to her about Renata's surprise birthday party.
Michael: Ótima ideia!
Braden: Great idea!
Tiago: A gente vai lá.
Braden: Let's go.
Michael: Agente? Qual agente? Um agente do governo? Ela tá com algum problema?
Braden: Agent? What agent? A government agent? Does she have some kind of problem?
Tiago: Haha! “A gente” significa nós! É a mesma coisa.
Braden: Ha ha! "The people" means us! It's the same thing.
Michael: Tenho certeza que eu não sou agente algum.
Braden: (doubting) I'm quite sure I'm not any kind of agent.
Tiago: Não! A... Gente. separado. É o jeito que falamos.
Braden: No! (he he) The...people, separate. It's the way we talk.
Michael: Que expressão estranha.
Braden: What a strange expression.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Braden: That sounds like a dialogue out of a novela!
Thássia: It does! It also sounds like a conversation I had with my friend when we were planning my mother's birthday.
Braden: Haha! That's good. So not just in novelas?
Thássia: No, this is a very normal conversation. Novelas are also a very normal part of Brazilian culture.
Braden: That's right! In Brazil, the main form of entertainment is television, and the most watched TV channel is Globo, right?
Thássia: That's right. Every evening Globo broadcasts novelas which are one of the most important aspects of TV in Brazil.
Braden: There are novelas every hour from 5
Thássia: Everyday.
VOCAB LIST
Braden: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Thássia: gente [natural native speed]
Braden: people, persons,
Thássia: gente [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: gente [natural native speed]
: Next:
Thássia: agente [natural native speed]
Braden: agent
Thássia: agente [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: agente [natural native speed]
: Next:
Thássia: nós [natural native speed]
Braden: we
Thássia: nós [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: nós [natural native speed]
: Next:
Thássia: convidar [natural native speed]
Braden: to invite
Thássia: convidar [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: convidar [natural native speed]
: Next:
Thássia: ideia [natural native speed]
Braden: idea
Thássia: ideia [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: ideia [natural native speed]
: Next:
Thássia: agora [natural native speed]
Braden: now
Thássia: agora [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: agora [natural native speed]
: Next:
Thássia: passar [natural native speed]
Braden: to pass, to spend
Thássia: passar [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: passar [natural native speed]
: Next:
Thássia: jeito [natural native speed]
Braden: way, mode, aspect, ability
Thássia: jeito [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: jeito [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Thássia: The first word/phrase we’ll look at is “passar."
Braden: In this lesson we are going to look at one of the meanings for “passar.”
Thássia: “Passar” has many different translations according to context.
Braden: In the dialogue, “passar” is used to mean “to go by” or “to visit.” So, the sentence “Eu queria passar na casa da Carla” means “I wanted to go by Carla’s house.”
Thássia: Our next word is “jeito”
Braden: “Jeito” is the Portuguese word for “way” or “manner.” It refers to how things are or how they are done.
Thássia: like in "o jeito brasileiro."
Braden: Right! "o jeito brasileiro" means "the Brazilian way."
Thássia: The last phrase we'll look at is "a gente."
Braden: In the dialogue, there was a misunderstanding about the use of the expression, a gente. This happened because these two terms, “a gente” and “agente,” are homonymns, the sound the same.
Thássia: “A gente” (written as two words) literally translates to “the people,” but actually means “we.”
Braden: "A gente" is used interchangeably with "nós" which is the suject pronoun for "we" which we learned in the last lesson.
Thássia: And “agente,” written as one word, is the Portuguese word for “agent.”
Braden: In Brazil, the southern dialects tend to use “nós” to mean “we” while northern dialects tend to use “a gente” for “we.” In Portugal, only “nós” is used to mean “we.”

Lesson focus

Braden: What's the focus of this lesson?
Thássia: The focus of this lesson is using “de” in Portuguese.
Braden: In the dialogue, Michael said
Thássia: "Um agente do governo?"
Braden: Which we translated as “A government agent?”
Thássia: “de” is a very important word in Portuguese. In Portuguese, "de" usually contracts with the article "o" to form "do." which is how Michael used it in the dialogue.
Braden: "de" is a preposition that usually translates to “of” or “from” in English but it has many more meanings and uses. Your going to hear it all the time so first we’ll take a look at the pronunciation, the uses of “de” to show possession, and then contractions with the word “de.”
Thássia: Since “de” is such an important word, it has several possible pronunciations. Which pronuciation a person uses is dependent on where they were born and which dialect of Portuguese they learned growing up.
Braden: This is a very complicated issue but basically, the deep south or Sul of Brazil say “de” (de). People from the middle of the country say “de” (g) and peope from the north and northeast of Brazil say “de” (di). Most radio, television and Internet vocies use "de."
Thássia: One very common way to use "de" is to show possession.
Braden: Portuguese does not use an apostrophe -s to show possession, as is “Sarah’s shoes.”
Thássia: The correct way to express this idea is to say “the shoes of Sarah” or, in Portuguese “os sapatos de Sarah.”
Braden: But since "de" contracts with so many other parts of speech in Portuguese, it's some times hard to see just how prevelant it is.
Braden: Like we said earlier, "de" often contracts with articles. In fact the rule is that whenever “de” is followed by the articles
Thássia: “o,” "a," "os," or "as" or
Braden: it will form a contraction. So, "de" followed by "o" will contract to just "do." like it did in the dialogue. or if "de" is followed by an "a" then it contracts to form "da." as in
Thássia: "esse livro é da livraria." which means
Braden: "this book is of the book store."
Thássia: And a quick tip, “De” always contracts with the pronouns ele(s) and ela(s) to form “dele(s)” and “dela(s).” We won't teach this until ABS2 12 but you're probably going to see it a lot so we'd give you a heads up.
Braden: Wow, "de" must be used a lot if it contracts with so many things.
Thássia: Yes, very important.

Outro

Braden: That just about does it for today.
Thássia: Listeners, have you ever dreamed of starring in one of our lessons?
Braden: If your answer is yes, use the voice-recording-tool on the lessons page!
Thássia: Record your voice with a click of a button,
Braden: ...and then play it back just as easily.
Thássia: Then, compare it to the native speakers in the lesson...
Braden: ...and adjust your pronunciation!
Thássia: After a few tries, you'll be speaking better Portuguese than Braden here!
Braden: Hey!
Thássia: Go to PortuguesePod101.com, and rapidly improve your Portuguese pronunciation!
Braden: See ya next time!
Thássia: Tchau! Até mais!

15 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Monday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
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Have you ever planned a surprise birthday party?

PortuguesePod101.com
Thursday at 7:25 pm
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Olá William, tudo bem?

Hi William, how are you?


Great to know that you liked the lesson!


In case of any questions, please contact us.


Atenciosamente,

Cristiane

Team PortuguesePod101.com

William
Wednesday at 9:31 am
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Oi, boa tarde,


I like this lesson. It combined some humour, grammar and accents.

PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 6:39 am
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Hi Joe,


Thank you for your message.


"A gente" is often used in casual conversations and it uses the verb conjugated as a third person of speech/singular, For that reason in the dialogue we had " A gente vai lá".

In case you use "nós" (we), then you can use the verb conjugated in the second person of speech/plural:

Nós vamos lá.


:)

Should you have any questions, please let us know.


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Joe
Tuesday at 4:17 am
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Oi,


Why is it "A gente via la", and not "A gente vamos la"?


Obrigado,

Joe

PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Thursday at 3:31 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Oi Jenna,


Obrigada pelo comentário! Thanks for the comment!

The word "agente" is a masculine and feminine noun. So you just need to change the gender to clarify if you're talking about a woman or a man ("o agente", "a agente")


I've fixed the PDF lesson notes already.

I hope it helps! Please let me know if you have further questions!


Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Jenna
Wednesday at 4:57 pm
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Hello there


Thanks as always for the informative lessons.


I noticed though that in the lesson notes "agente" is listed as feminine, but in the rest of the notes it is used as masculine, i.e. o agente.


Is agente masculine or feminine?


Thanks!

PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Monday at 4:17 pm
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Oi Jim,


Que beleza! Se divirta bastante!

E lembre-se de deixar uns comentários de vez em quando para a gente! :wink:


Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Gringo Jim
Friday at 11:17 pm
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Muito obrigado, Paloma.

Eu vou voltar ao Brasil hoje. Graças a Deus!

Tchau for now.


Thanks a lot, Paloma.

I'll return to Brasil today. Thank God!

So long for now.


Jim

PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Friday at 8:47 am
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Oi Jim e David,


Você agora podem encontrar as notas dessa aula (Lesson Notes) em "Download PDFs".

Jim, obrigada pelo comentário!


Deixem um comentário se vocês tiverem qualquer dúvida!

Leave us a comment if you have any questions!

Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Gringo Jim
Monday at 5:43 am
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Boas lições! Mas não tem notas de lição pra mim aqui.


(Eu moro no Brasil e nos EUA. Eu gosto de PtPod 101!)