Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Thássia: Hi, my name is Thássia, and I am joined here by Braden.
Braden: Hello, everyone and welcome back to PortuguesePOD101.com
Thássia: What are we learning today?
Thássia: Braden, what are we going to learn in this lesson?
Braden: In this lesson you'll learn about the verb andar and it's many uses in Portuguese.
Thássia: Where does the conversation take place and who is it between?
Braden: The conversation takes place in the morning at a bus stop in Brasília and it's between Marta, Paula e and two cobradores.
Thássia: The situation is casual, therefore they'll be speaking informally.
DIALOGUE
Paula: Vamos andar de ônibus?
Marta: Vamos.
(a bus arrives)
Marta: Cobrador! Este ônibus irá passar no Conjunto Nacional?
Cobrador: O quê?
Paula: Me deixa falar com ele. Passa no Conjunto Nacional?
Cobrador: Passa não.
(bus leaves, another bus arrives)
Paula: Cobrador! Passa no Conjunto?
Cobrador: Passa não, mas passa nos ministérios.
Paula: Fica próximo?
Cobrador: Fica.
Marta: Quanto custa a passagem?
Cobrador: Três reais.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Paula: Vamos andar de ônibus?
Marta: Vamos.
(a bus arrives)
Marta: Cobrador! Este ônibus irá passar no Conjunto Nacional?
Cobrador: O quê?
Paula: Me deixa falar com ele. Passa no Conjunto Nacional?
Cobrador: Passa não.
(bus leaves, another bus arrives)
Paula: Cobrador! Passa no Conjunto?
Cobrador: Passa não, mas passa nos ministérios.
Paula: Fica próximo?
Cobrador: Fica.
Marta: Quanto custa a passagem?
Cobrador: Três reais.
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Paula: Vamos andar de ônibus?
Braden: Shall we ride the bus?
Marta: Vamos.
Braden: Let’s.
(a bus arrives)
Braden(A bus arrives)
Marta: Cobrador! Este ônibus irá passar no Conjunto Nacional?
Braden: Cobrador! This bus goes by the Conjunto Nacional?
Cobrador: O quê?
Braden: What?
Paula: Me deixa falar com ele. Passa no Conjunto Nacional?
Braden: Let me talk to him. Going by the Conjunto Nacional?
Cobrador: Passa não.
Braden: No.
(bus leaves, another bus arrives)
Braden(bus leaves, another bus arrives)
Paula: Cobrador! Passa no Conjunto?
Braden: Cobrador! Going by the Conjunto?
Cobrador: Passa não, mas passa nos ministérios.
Braden: No, but it goes by the ministry.
Paula: Fica próximo?
Braden: Is that close?
Cobrador: Fica.
Braden: Yes.
Marta: Quanto custa a passagem?
Braden: How much is the fare?
Cobrador: Três reais.
Braden: Three reals.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Thássia: Braden Could you tell us about Brasília? You lived tehre for a while didin't you?
Braden: Yes. Brasília is the capital of Brazil in the same way that Washington DC is the capital of the United States.The Conjunto Nacional that Paula and Joaquim are trying to get to is a large mall near the center of Brasília.
Thássia: Brasília is a planned city modeled to look like a plane from above, right?
Braden: Right. and since it's a planned city, Brasília is full of some pretty impressive architecture from famous Brazilian artists, the main ones being Oscar Niemeyer and Lúcio Costa. To me, the most prominet point is the capitol where the "cockpit" is located.
VOCAB LIST
Braden: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Thássia: cobrador [natural native speed]
Braden: cashier
Thássia: cobrador [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: cobrador [natural native speed]
: Next:
Thássia: passagem [natural native speed]
Braden: passage, ticket
Thássia: passagem [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: passagem [natural native speed]
: Next:
Thássia: ministério [natural native speed]
Braden: ministry
Thássia: ministério [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: ministério [natural native speed]
: Next:
Thássia: próximo [natural native speed]
Braden: next
Thássia: próximo [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: próximo [natural native speed]
: Next:
Thássia: andar [natural native speed]
Braden: to walk
Thássia: andar [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: andar [natural native speed]
: Next:
Thássia: ônibus [natural native speed]
Braden: bus
Thássia: ônibus [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: ônibus [natural native speed]
: Next:
Thássia: bicicleta [natural native speed]
Braden: bicycle, bike
Thássia: bicicleta [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: bicicleta [natural native speed]
: Next:
Thássia: custar [natural native speed]
Braden: to cost
Thássia: custar [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: custar [natural native speed]
: Next:
Thássia: caminho [natural native speed]
Braden: way
Thássia: caminho [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: caminho [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Thássia: In this lesson, we’re are going to learn the expression “cortar caminho.”
Braden: Translating literally, “cortar caminho” means “to cut way,” but it really means “to take a shortcut.”
Thássia: For example, one would say “vamos cortar caminho indo pelo parque,” it would mean “let’s take a shortcut going though the park.”
Braden: Our next phrases are “quanto custa” and “quanto é” which are two expressions used to ask the price.
Thássia: “quanto custa” means “how much does it cost” and “quanto é” means “how much is it?” However, it is typicall better to use “quanto custa” in a formal situation.
Braden: Our last phrase is “me deixa” which means “let me.” You can hear several variations on this expression such as “deixe-me” or “deixa eu” but they all mean “let me.”
Thássia: In the dialogue, Paula said “Me deixa falar com ele” which was translates as “Let me talk to him.” When used independently and typically with a tone of irritation, “me deixa” means, “leave me alone.”

Lesson focus

Thássia: Braden what's the focus of this lesson?
Braden: The focus of this lesson is the verb andar.
Thássia: In the dialogue Paula said "Vamos andar de ônibus?" to mean "Let’s ride the bus?”
Braden: The verb “andar” means “to walk” but in this sense it meant to "ride."
Thássia: And as a noun it can also mean “floor” as in “the 9th floor.”
Braden: The verb andar is a regular -ar verb and is conjugated according to regular -ar verb rules.
Thássia: So Eu ando means I walk, Você anda means you walk, ele or ela anda means he or she walks, nós andamos means we walk, vocês andam means y'all walk and eles ou elas andam means they walk.
Braden: Great review, Thássia! So another meaning for the verb “andar” is “to ride” as in “to ride a bike” or “to ride the bus.”
Thássia: For example, Vamos andar de ônibus? means “Are we going to ride the bus?”
Braden: And Eu gosto de andar de bicicleta. means “I like riding bikes.”
Thássia: Now when you use the verb andar like a noun then it means floor as in floor of a building.
Braden: Exactly. For example, the sentence "Aquele prédio tem quinze andares." means "That building over there has 15 floors.”
Thássia: The plural of andar is andares.
Braden: and a quick pronunciation tip is that Brazilians tend to cut off the last half of the words they say.
Thássia: Yes. The phrase “vamos andar de ônibus,” in casual conversation would probably sound something like “Vamo andá de ônibus.”
Braden: Cutting words like this is not correct per se but in my experience most Brazilians will cut some part of their words.
Thássia: Even the verb andar which has an "r" at the end can often sound like "andá." If you ever do any travelling in brazil you'll hear the verb andar used all the time, from cars, to bikes, to busses, to planes, andar is a very good verb to know.
Braden: and it's regular so that makes it even easier.

Outro

Braden: That just about does it for today.
Thássia: Get instant access to all of our language learning lessons.
Braden: With any subscription, instantly access our entire library of audio and video lessons!
Thássia: Download the lessons or listen or watch online...
Braden: Put them on your phone or another mobile device, and listen, watch and learn anywhere.
Thássia: Lessons are organized by level, so progress in order, one level at a time...
Braden: ...or skip around to different levels. It?s up to you!
Thássia: Instantly access them all right now at PortuguesePod101.com
Braden: Bye bye!
Thássia: Tchau tchau!

Grammar

Portuguese Grammar Made Easy - Unlock This Lesson’s Grammar Guide

Easily master this lesson’s grammar points with in-depth explanations and examples. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

5 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Anyone ever been to Brasília?

PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 12:33 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Oi Liv,


That's right. Marta is using European Portuguese, so it's harder for the cobrador to understand her.


Her sentence is correct, but using a conjugation we don't usually use in everyday like. Perhaps if she spoke slower it would be easier to understand.


Hope it helps!

Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Liv
Saturday at 05:16 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Muito obrigada pelo esses lições. Eu ouço-los do meu apartamento ao trabalho diariamente e estou aprendendo muito.

Estou com uma pergunta sobre esse lição. Por que o cobrador não entenda a Marta? Porque ela está falando português do Portugal? O português dela parece ter umas conjugações estranhas, com certeza!

PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Monday at 05:10 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Oi Ahmed,


Muito obrigada por encontrar o erro.:oops:

O PDF já foi corrigido.


Atenciosamente,

Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101

Ahmed
Sunday at 07:28 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Oi,


Em (VOCABULARY PHRASE USAGE): cortar caminho


"vamos cortar caminho indo pelo parque" se traduze ""let's take a shortcut

going though :smile: the park"


é (through) não (though)


Obrigado