Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Braden: Hello, and welcome to PortuguesePOD101.com, where we study modern Portuguese in a fun, educational format!
Thássia: So, brush up on the Portuguese that you started learning long ago, or start learning today.
Braden: Thanks for being here with us for this lesson, Thássia, what are we looking at in this lesson?
Braden: So Thássia, what are we going to learn in this lesson?
Thássia: In this lesson you'll learn how to conjugate regular -ir verbs in the present tense.
Braden: Where does this conversation take place and who is it between?
Thássia: The conversation takes place in the afternoon on the phone and it's between Paula and the receptionist.
Braden: The speakers are not friends, therefore they'll be speaking formally. Let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
(Ao telefone)
(Ao telefone)
Recepcionista: Recepção, Bom dia!
Paula: Bom dia.
Recepcionista: Em que posso ajudá-la?
Paula: Bem, decidimos comer num restaurante. Poderia me informar o nome de algum bom restaurante por aqui?
Recepcionista: Nós temos uma lista dos melhores restaurantes e churrascarias da cidade.
Paula: Que bom! Estamos com muita fome. Onde fica sua churrascaria predileta?
Recepcionista: Fica meio longe, mas é minha predileta. Vocês tem transporte?
Paula: Não temos.
Recepcionista: Então eu vou chamar um táxi para vocês.
Paula: Obrigada. Estaremos prontos para partir às onze e trinta.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Recepcionista: Recepção, Bom dia!
Paula: Bom dia.
Recepcionista: Em que posso ajudá-la?
Paula: Bem, decidimos comer num restaurante. Poderia me informar o nome de algum bom restaurante por aqui?
Recepcionista: Nós temos uma lista dos melhores restaurantes e churrascarias da cidade.
Paula: Que bom! Estamos com muita fome. Onde fica sua churrascaria predileta?
Recepcionista: Fica meio longe, mas é minha predileta. Vocês tem transporte?
Paula: Não temos.
Recepcionista: Então eu vou chamar um táxi para vocês.
Paula: Obrigada. Estaremos prontos para partir às onze e trinta.
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
(Ao telefone)
Braden(On the telephone)
Recepcionista: Recepção, Bom dia!
Braden: Reception, good morning!
Paula: Bom dia.
Braden: Good morning.
Recepcionista: Em que posso ajudá-la?
Braden: How can I help you?
Paula: Bem, decidimos comer num restaurante. Poderia me informar o nome de algum bom restaurante por aqui?
Braden: Well, we decided to eat at a restaurant. Could you tell me the name of some good restaurant nearby?
Recepcionista: Nós temos uma lista dos melhores restaurantes e churrascarias da cidade.
Braden: We have a list of the best restaurants and steak houses in the city.
Paula: Que bom! Estamos com muita fome. Onde fica sua churrascaria predileta?
Braden: That’s great! We are very hungry. Where is your favorite steak house?
Recepcionista: Fica meio longe, mas é minha predileta. Vocês tem transporte?
Braden: It’s a bit far, but it’s my favorite. Do you have transportation?
Paula: Não temos.
Braden: No, we don’t.
Recepcionista: Então eu vou chamar um táxi para vocês.
Braden: Then I’ll call a taxi for you.
Paula: Obrigada. Estaremos prontos para partir às onze e trinta.
Braden: Thanks. We’ll be ready to depart at eleven-thirty.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Braden: So Thássia, where is Curitiba and what is it like?
Thássia: Curitiba is located in the state of Paraná in Southern Brazil. Like much of southern Brazil, Curitiba has strong German, Italian, and Japanese influences. From architecture to music to cuisine, Curitiba is a unique blend of several of the most unique culture on the planet.
Braden: It was the first city in Brazil to have an IMAX theater (although now several other cities do too), it’s one of the richest cities in Brazil, has one of the highest per capita incomes in Brazil, is the second largest industrial center in Brazil, and is often ranked in the top 100 (50) most important cities in the world.
Thássia: For the over two million tourists Curitiba receives every year through it large international airport, the tri-domed Botanical Gardens, and the state museum of Paraná are must see destinations.
VOCAB LIST
Braden: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Thássia: abrir [natural native speed]
Braden: to open
Thássia: abrir [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: abrir [natural native speed]
: Next:
Thássia: dormir [natural native speed]
Braden: sleep
Thássia: dormir [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: dormir [natural native speed]
: Next:
Thássia: servir [natural native speed]
Braden: to serve
Thássia: servir [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: servir [natural native speed]
: Next:
Thássia: seguir [natural native speed]
Braden: to follow
Thássia: seguir [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: seguir [natural native speed]
: Next:
Thássia: sugerir [natural native speed]
Braden: to suggest,
Thássia: sugerir [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: sugerir [natural native speed]
: Next:
Thássia: vestir [natural native speed]
Braden: to wear, to dress, to clothe
Thássia: vestir [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: vestir [natural native speed]
: Next:
Thássia: cair [natural native speed]
Braden: to fall
Thássia: cair [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: cair [natural native speed]
: Next:
Thássia: fome [natural native speed]
Braden: hunger
Thássia: fome [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: fome [natural native speed]
: Next:
Thássia: sono [natural native speed]
Braden: sleep, sleepiness, tiredness
Thássia: sono [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: sono [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Thássia: In this lesson we’re going to learn some expressions using the “estar” verb. The first expression we’ll look at is “estar com fome.”
Braden: Literally, “estar com fome” means “to be with hunger” but it is used as “to be hungry.” In the dialogue we saw Paula saying the phrase “estamos com muita fome” to mean “we are very hungry.”
Thássia: The next expression we’ll look at is “estar com sono.” “Estar com sono” literally translates to “to be with sleep” but, it actually means “to be sleepy.”
Braden: In Portuguese, “estou com sono” doesn’t sound juvenille like it’s translation “I’m sleepy.” “Estou com sono” is just as natural in Portuguese as “I’m tired” is in English.”
Thássia: Translating “estar com sede” literally, it means “to be with thirst,” but is is used like “to be thirsty.”
Braden: Pay especial attention when saying “sede.”
Thássia: Yes. “S(ê)de,” which means “thirst,” is different than “s(é)de,” which means “headquarters.” “Sede” to mean thirst has a closed “ê,” and “sede” to mean “headquarters’ has an open “é.”
Braden: “Ter fome” means “to have hunger,” but it is used as “to be hungry.” “Tenho fome” is just a variation of “estou com fome.” The same thing happens to “ter sono” and “ter sede” they mean “to be tired” and “to be thirsty,” respectively, and are variations of “estar com sono” and “estar com sede.”
Thássia: Brazilian Portuguese tends to favor the verb “estar” which means “to be” over the verb “ter,” and Portugal Portuguese tends to favor the verb “ter” which means “to have.”

Lesson focus

Braden: What are we looking at in this lesson?
Thássia: The focus of this lesson is verbs that end in -ir
Braden: in the dialogue we heard the phrase "Decidimos comer num restaurante"
Thássia: Right, which we translatied as "We decided to eat at a restaurant.”
Braden: The verb "decidimos" is a conjugated form of the verb "decidir" which is an "ir" verb.
Thássia: To form the present tense of regular -ir verbs, drop the -ir ending from the infinitive verb and add the conjugated ending that corresponds with the pronoun you wish to use. Be sure to check out the lesson notes for the verb chart.
Braden: So we're going to conjugate the verb "abrir" which means "to open." "Abrir" is also a regular ir verb. Thássia, how do you say "I open"
Thássia: Eu abro
Braden: and you open
Thássia: Você abre
Braden: and he/she/it opens
Thássia: Ele ou ela abre
Braden: and we open
Thássia: Nós abrimos
Braden: and y'all open?
Thássia: Vocês abrem
Braden: and they open
Thássia: Eles ou elas abrem
Braden: So in the dialogue, the sentence Estaremos prontos pra partir às onze e trinta. was translated as "We’ll be ready to depart at eleven thirty."
Thássia: Partir is another regular -ir verb that follows this pattern.
Braden: In this sentence the verb "partir" is in it's inifintive or non-conjugated form. This is because the preposition "para" comes before it.
Thássia: In Portuguese, whenever a verb follows the preposition "para" that verb will always be in its infinitive form.
Braden: Thássia
Thássia: Sure, Quem decide o que fazemos na aula?. Which means "Who decides what we do in class."
Braden: and how would you ask the question "Who leaves for Brazil tomorrow?" –
Thássia: Quem parte para o Brasil amanhã?
Braden: So how important are -ir verbs?
Thássia: Very. -ir verbs are the third most common type of verbs in Brazilian Portuguese. We use -ir verbs everyday.

Outro

Braden: That just about does it for today.
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Braden: Bye bye!
Thássia: Tchau! Até mais!

5 Comments

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PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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Have you ever visited Curitiba? I live there! Come say "Hi!"

Portuguesepod101.com Verified
Friday at 10:04 PM
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Hi Marie,


Thanks for posting.


Indeed it's not usual to say "partir" among Brazilians. We use the verb "ir" ("to go") but in the sense of "to leave" as in the examples:


Ele foi embora cedo ontem.

He left early yesterday.


Vou embora daqui a pouco.

I'm leaving soon.


If you have any doubts, we'll be glad to help you. :wink:


Cristiane

Team Portuguesepod101.com

Marie
Thursday at 07:43 PM
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I was told by a Brazilian friend of mine that it would be better to use the verb 'ir' instead of 'partir' when talking about someone who has left a place because 'partir' dipicts death whiles 'ir' means to go or leave. How true is that?

PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Saturday at 05:11 PM
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Olá jsdunbar1430,


I am really sorry about it. The Premium Learning Center is fixed now.

Thank you for pointing it out!


Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101.com

jsdunbar1430
Saturday at 11:26 AM
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Where is the line-by-line dialogue, vocabulary, etc.?