Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Braden: Hello, and welcome back to the PortuguesePOD101.com , the fastest, easiest and most fun way to learn Portuguese! I'm joined in the studio by...
Thássia: Hello everyone. Thássia here.
Braden: Thássia, What are we going to learn in this lesson?
Thássia: In this lesson you'll learn how to use possessive adjectives.
Braden: Where does this conversation take place and who is is between?
Thássia: This conversation takes place in Recife on the phone and it's between Marta and another person in the building.
Thássia: The speakers are not friends, therefore they will be speaking formally.
Braden: Let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Homem: Esse é o apartamento 803?
Marta: Sim, é.
Homem: Esse apartamento é seu?
Marta: Não. Estamos aqui de temporada.
Homem: Mas o martelo é seu?
Marta: Sim! Desculpa o barulho, estamos Consertando a porta da casa de banho.
Homem: É que não pode usar martelo no horário de almoço.
Marta: Mas, é uma e quarenta e cinco da tarde.
Homem: Nosso horário de almoço é de meio-dia às quatorze horas.
Marta: Até quatorze horas? Por que teu horário de almoço é tanto tempo assim?
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Homem: Esse é o apartamento 803?
Marta: Sim, é.
Homem: Esse apartamento é seu?
Marta: Não. Estamos aqui de temporada.
Homem: Mas o martelo é seu?
Marta: Sim! Desculpa o barulho, estamos Consertando a porta da casa de banho.
Homem: É que não pode usar martelo no horário de almoço.
Marta: Mas, é uma e quarenta e cinco da tarde.
Homem: Nosso horário de almoço é de meio-dia às quatorze horas.
Marta: Até quatorze horas? Por que teu horário de almoço é tanto tempo assim?
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Homem: Esse é o apartamento 803?
Braden: Is this apartment 803?
Marta: Sim, é.
Braden: Yes, it is.
Homem: Esse apartamento é seu?
Braden: Is this your apartment?
Marta: Não. Estamos aqui de temporada.
Braden: No. We're here for a short time.
Homem: Mas o martelo é seu?
Braden: But the hammer is yours?
Marta: Sim! Desculpa o barulho, estamos Consertando a porta da casa de banho.
Braden: Yes! Sorry about the noise. We’re fixing the bathroom door.
Homem: É que não pode usar martelo no horário de almoço.
Braden: It's that you can't use hammers during lunch time.
Marta: Mas, é uma e quarenta e cinco da tarde.
Braden: But, it's one forty-five p.m.
Homem: Nosso horário de almoço é de meio-dia às quatorze horas.
Braden: Our lunch time is from noon to two o'clock.
Marta: Até quatorze horas? Por que teu horário de almoço é tanto tempo assim?
Braden: Until two o'clock? Why is your lunch period so long?
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Braden: So, Thássia, what's Recife like?
Thássia: It's a nice place. Recife literally means “reef” and refers to the coral reefs near the city. It also has two sea ports and the largest airport in the Northeast region of Brazil.
Braden: This has made Recife a cultural, shipping, and tourist hub for the entire region. Recife, or better, Olinda has one of the largest and most active Carnaval celebrations in Brazil after Salvador and Rio de Janeiro.
Thássia: Recife, and the Nordeste as a whole, typically has a very long lunch break starting at 12 o'clock and going to 2 o'clock, which is why they had this confusion in the dialogue.
Braden: You can find evidence of this long lunch break in other regions of Brazil but in the Nordeste, the custom is so strong that building complexes, apartments, government employees, and many others actually have it written in the contract that during these hours, no work can be done.
VOCAB LIST
Braden: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Thássia: meu [natural native speed]
Braden: my, mine
Thássia: meu [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: meu [natural native speed]
: Next:
Thássia: seu [natural native speed]
Braden: your, yours
Thássia: seu [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: seu [natural native speed]
: Next:
Thássia: nosso [natural native speed]
Braden: our, ours
Thássia: nosso [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: nosso [natural native speed]
: Next:
Thássia: almoço [natural native speed]
Braden: lunch
Thássia: almoço [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: almoço [natural native speed]
: Next:
Thássia: teu [natural native speed]
Braden: thy, thine
Thássia: teu [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: teu [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Thássia: The first word/phrase we’ll look at is “da tarde”
Braden: Translating literally, “da tarde” means “of the afternoon,” but it really means “in the afternoon” and is used as “p.m.” in telling the time.
Thássia: Brazilians use military time, so you say 1 p.m. as “treze horas” which means “thirteen o’ clock.”
Braden: Sometimes you'll hear “uma da tarde” which translates to “one of the afternoon.” Both “treze horas” and “uma da tarde” mean 1 p.m.
Thássia: The next expression we’ll look at in this lesson is “da manhã.”
Braden: “Da manhã” literally translates to “of the morning,” but it’s actual meaning is “in the morning” and it’s used as a.m. in telling the time.
Thássia: “Da manhã” (in the morning) is used in opposition to “da tarde” (in the afternnon), sometimes it is crucial to use one of these expression not to cause any misunderstanding.
Braden: Last we have the words “quatorze” spelled with a "q-u" and “catorze” spelled with a "c."
Thássia: These are the two words for “fourteen” in Portuguese. You can use either word, although the preferred and most common is “quatorze,” with a "q-u"
Braden: They are pronounced the same way, so don't get too confused. The only difference is in writing.

Lesson focus

Braden: Let's take a look at the grammar point
Thássia: The focus of this lesson is possessive adjectives &possessive pronouns
Braden: In the dialogue we heard the phrase "Esse apartamento é seu?" To mean
"Is this apartamento yours?”
Thássia: Here the other person living in the apartment complex used the possessive pronoun "seu."
Braden: Possessive adjectives are words that describe possession, like my, your, his, her, its, our, and their. In Portuguese, these words are...
Thássia: Meu and Minha for "my"
Braden: Seu and sua for your, his, her and its.
Thássia: Nosso and Nossa for our
Braden: and seu and sua for your plural and their.
Thássia: And you can pluralize any of these word by adding an "s" at the end.
Braden: And just as a quick note, in Portugal they say Teu and Tua for your. and Vosso and Vossa as the plural "your."
Thássia: Right.
Braden: So before we explain about the many overlaps that exist here, we'll talk about the rules of how to use possessives in Portuguese.
Thássia: First, Possessive adjectives normally come before the noun they modify, just like in English. Like in the sentence, "Drink your water" the "your" comes before the noun water.
Braden: It's the same in Portuguese, "Toma sua água" Which means drink your water has the "sua" which means "your" before the "agua" which means water.
Thássia: Second, possessives must agree in number and gender with the thing possessed, no the possessor. So in the previous example, água is a feminine noun so the feminine possessive adjective "sua" was used.
Braden: And third, Possessives can optionally be preceded by an article such as o, a, os, as. Now articles are elusive little creatures in Natural spoken Portuguese. For example, the sentence "Obrigado pela sua ajuda." which means “Thank you for your help" does have an article but it isn't a separate word.
Thássia: It's hidden in the word "pela." Pela is a contraction of the words "por" and "a" which mean"for" and "the." So the contracted word, "pela" also means "for the."
Braden: So an exact translation of the phrase "Obrigado pela sua ajuda." would be "thank you for the your help." That sounds very odd in English but in Portuguese it sounds quite intelligent, right?
Thássia: Yes, very educated.
Braden: Okay, so our quick tip for this lesson is that in English, we have both possessive adjectives and possessive pronouns. Possessive adjectives usually come before the noun like your, my, our, etc. and possessive pronouns usually come after the noun, like yours, mine, ours, etc.
Thássia: In Portuguese, they’re the same words. “seu” is “seu” whether it comes before the noun or after the noun.
Braden: For example, the sentence, Essa é sua casa? means Is this your house? If you change the order in English you get Is this house yours? In Portuguese it doesn't change, It's just essa casa é sua?
Thássia: For those of you studying Portugal Portuguese, we have a write up about the differences between "teu" and "vosso" in the lesson notes.

Outro

Braden: That just about does it for today.
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Braden: Thanks for listening!
Thássia: Tenha um ótimo dia!

11 Comments

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PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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When I think of possessives, I'm often reminded of Bill Cosby and Jeffery: MINE! MINE! MINE!

What are you reminded of?

PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Monday at 09:19 PM
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Oi Daniel,


That's great your question was answered.

In Brazil, it's much more common to use "dele" or "dela" for his/hers, and "seu" or "sua" for yours. In this way, you can clearly show the listener which person you're referring to.


I hoep it helps. Let me know if you have any questions!

Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Daniel Le Gros
Thursday at 07:36 PM
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And like Jacek, I see this question is answered in lesson 12!! :sunglasses:

Daniel Le Gros
Thursday at 06:34 PM
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Ola!!


Muito Obrigado!! As aulas sao fantastico!!


Uma pergunta. Closely related to the question that Jacek had below, I am also a little confused by these.


Take this situation for example. I am sitting in a classroom with many other people, and I see a pen on the floor. I pick up the pen and say to the person nearest to me. " Esta e sua caneta?". This person responds "Nao e". So then I say to that same person, who has a man sitting beside them " Esta e sua caneta?". In this case, I mean to say 'Is that his pen', but from what I can tell this could be misunderstood, and I am better to say "Esta e a caneta dele?"

PortuguesePod101.com Verified
Thursday at 09:52 AM
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Hi Carole,


Thank you for your positive feedback!

Let us know if you have any question.


Regards,

Laura

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Carole
Sunday at 04:07 AM
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I love that both Portuguese and Brazilian dialects are featured in this lesson :smile:

Jacek
Tuesday at 04:04 AM
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Yes, it did. Also next lesson clearify a bit my view.

Muito obrigado.

Braden
Tuesday at 01:36 AM
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Hey Jacek!


You just asked the question that bothered me for the 1st 6 months of my Portuguese studies. The simple answer is, seu/sua can mean both "your/yours" and "his/her" while dele/dela can only mean "his/her." Because of the overlapping, most of the time seu/sua will mean "your/yours", not "his/her."


They also have different grammatical properties. Seu/sua agree in number and gender 'with the noun they modify' while dele/dela agree in number and gender 'with the subject of the sentence.'


Did that help?

Jacek
Friday at 04:42 AM
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Ok English is not my native language so misunderstandings happen me often :neutral:


I forgot that word "your" means "of you" and also "of you Sir, of you Madam". In Polish we've got different words, it's easier. So statement: "A minha familia está bem. Como esta a sua?" is translated as "My family is fine. How is yours?" Is it formal question for adults, strangers etc.?


But in ABS1 L9 we can find dele/dela for his/her. They can be replaced by seu/sua?


I don't know I explained better. If not, it's ok. I will learn by heart the table from this lesson.


Best regards.

Braden
Thursday at 06:31 AM
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Hey Jacek! Thanks for commenting!


I'm sorry but I'm not exactly sure what you mean. Could you explain a bit more?

Jacek
Tuesday at 11:08 PM
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I'm a little bit confused. In Abs#1 series I have learned possesives like: meu/minha, seu/sua, dele/dela and nosso/nossa, deles/delas (I don't remember forms of vocês). And here I'm reading something different. Why I don't understand?