Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Thássia: Bom dia!
Braden: Braden here! Absolute Beginner Season 1, Lesson 20 - Brazilian Accents. In this lesson we'll focus on regular verbs ending in "-ar."
Thássia: This conversation takes place at a café and it's between Austin and Andréia.
Braden: The speakers are friends, so they'll be speaking casually.
Thassia: Let's listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

(Casual)
Austin: Você é vendedora, não é?
Andréia: Sou sim.
Austin: Você fala muito com as pessoas?
Andréia: Sim falo. E eles falam bastante também.
Braden:One time slowly.
Austin: Você é vendedora, não é?
Andréia: Sou sim.
Austin: Você fala muito com as pessoas?
Andréia: Sim falo. E eles falam bastante também.
Braden:One time fast with translation.
Austin: Você é vendedora, não é?
Braden: You are a vendor, right?
Andréia: Sou sim.
Braden: Yes, I am.
Austin: Você fala muito com as pessoas?
Braden: You talk with people a lot?
Andréia: Sim falo. E eles falam bastante também.
Braden: Yes, I do. And they talk a lot, too.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Braden: I heard that "-r" in the word "vendedora" and was reminded that the pronunciation for the letter "-r" in Portuguese is probably the most variable of all the letters.
Thássia: That's true. Depending on the dialect, the "-r" can sound like an "-h," like the American "-r," like the Spanish rolled "-r's," or any combination or variation of these.
Braden: It's important to listen to the native speakers around you and pick an accent you like and copy that one.
Thássia: That's a very good tip because often foreigners make the mistake of learning some certain words in one dialect and other words in another dialect. It makes them hard to understand.
VOCAB LIST
Braden: Let's take a look at the vocabulary. Out first word is.
Thássia: Falar [natural native speed]
Braden: Speak, talk.
Thássia: Falar [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: Falar [natural native speed]
Braden: And our next word is.
Thássia: Vendedora [natural native speed]
Braden: Saleswoman
Thássia: Vendedora [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: Vendedora [natural native speed]
Braden: Next we have.
Thássia: Muito [natural native speed]
Braden: Very, much, many.
Thássia: Muito [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: Muito [natural native speed]
Braden: And the next word is.
Thássia: Também [natural native speed]
Braden: Also, too
Thássia: Também [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: Também [natural native speed]
Braden: What's our next word?
Thássia: Sim [natural native speed]
Braden: Yes
Thássia: Sim [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: Sim [natural native speed]
Braden: And the next word is.
Thássia: Sou [natural native speed]
Braden: Am
Thássia: Sou [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: Sou [natural native speed]
Braden: So our next word is.
Thássia: Eles [natural native speed]
Braden: They
Thássia: Eles [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: Eles [natural native speed]
Braden: And our last word is.
Thássia: Com [natural native speed]
Braden: With
Thássia: Com [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Thássia: Com [natural native speed]
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Braden: Let's have a closer look at one of the phrases from this lesson.
Thássia: The phrase we'll look at is "sou sim."
Braden: Literally, this translates to "am yes," but means "yes, I am."
Thássia: This phrase is used to confirm something about you, usually a comment or question.
Braden: For example, if someone asked you "Você é Americano," you'd respond with "sou sim."
Thássia: If, of course, you were American.
Braden: Right. now, you could say "Sim, sou," which translates to "yes, I am," and makes more sense in English but…
Thássia: We don't talk like that. It makes sense, but it sounds funny.
Braden: Let's take a look at today's grammar point.

Lesson focus

Thássia: The focus of this lesson is regular verbs ending in "-ar."
Braden: In the dialogue, we heard the phrases "Sim falo. E eles falam bastante também."
Thássia: These phrases translate to "Yes, I do. And they talk a lot, also."
Braden: The verb "falar" means "to speak" and it's a regular verb, which means it follows the normal conjugation rules.
Thássia: In this lesson, we'll teach you how to conjugate the verb "falar" in the present tense.
Braden: Right. The present tense in Portuguese is much like the present tense in English.
Thássia: We use it to say sentences like "you speak," which is "você fala."
Braden: Or, "you are speaking," which is…
Thássia: "Você fala."
Braden: Or "Do you speak," which is…
Thássia: "Você fala."
Braden: As you can see, English has many minute changes where the Portuguese simply stays the same.
Thássia: If you want to use it as a question like "Do you speak?" you say "Você fala?"
Braden: "Você fala?"
Thassia: "Você fala?"
Braden: It's all in the intonation. Same words, just raise the intonation at the end.
Thássia: Or "You are speaking tomorrow," you still could say "Você fala amanhã."
Braden: So here's the rule. Remember that infinitives are the dictionary form of verbs to form the present tense of infinitives ending in "-ar," drop the final "-ar" and add the correct present tense endings.
Thássia: So, the infinitive is "falar" and then you drop the "-ar" at the end and you get "fal." Then you add the endings according to the pattern.
Braden: Right, so for "I speak," it would be…
Thássia: "Eu falo."
Braden: And for "You speak," it would be…
Thássia: "Você fala."
Braden: And for "he or she speaks," it would be…
Thássia: "Ele fala" or "ela fala."
Braden: And for "we speak," it would be…
Thássia: "Nós falamos."
Braden: And for "they speak."
Thássia: "Eles falam."
Braden: We've got a great chart in the PDF so check that out.
Thássia: It's also a good idea to write down the conjugation patterns for regular verbs and keep them with you while you are learning.
Braden: That just about does it for today.
Thássia: Okay. Some of the listeners already know about the most powerful tool on PortuguesePOD101.com.
Braden: Line by line audio.
Thássia: The perfect tool for improving listening comprehension.
Braden: By listening to lines of the conversation again and again.
Thássia: Listen and to every word and syllable becomes clear. Basically, we break down the dialogue into comprehensible bite size sentences.
Braden: You can try the line by line audio at PortuguesePOD101.com. See you next lesson.

Grammar

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15 Comments

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PortuguesePod101.com
Tuesday at 6:30 pm
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Did that make sense?

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Portuguesepod101.com
Monday at 8:45 pm
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Hi Alkan,


Thank you for your positive feedback!


Just a reminder:

A male speaker says "Obrigado" and a female speaker says "Obrigada". Please find more details about thanking in Portuguese in this lesson:

https://www.portuguesepod101.com/2012/07/20/learn-portuguese-in-three-minutes-2-brazilian-manners/


If you have any questions, please let us know ;)


Cristiane

Team Portuguesepod101.com

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Alkan
Sunday at 2:22 pm
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Otimo! Obrigada pela licao :)

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PortuguesePod101.com
Monday at 4:32 pm
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Oi Michael,


It should be

Eu falo - I speak

Eles falam - They speak

Nós falamos - We speak


I hope it helps!

Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101.com

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Michael
Saturday at 3:35 am
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Ola,


Does this mean the following?

Eu falo - I am speaking, I do speak, I speak

eles falam - they speak, they are speaking, they do speak,

Nos falamos - we speak, we are speaking, we do speak,

etc


Muito obrigado

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PortuguesePod101.com
Thursday at 4:34 pm
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Oi Frank,


In the audio, they say "supermercado", with "o". Supermercado does not have feminine form, only plural form.

Maybe it was a different Brazilian accent that made you confused?

Please keep listening to it, until you can hear the difference. But if you're still having troubles to understand it, please contact us again!


Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101.com

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Frank Smith
Thursday at 6:09 am
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Oi. Eu tenho uma pergunta.


On the flash cards the word supermercado comes up. The speaker on the recording sounds like she is saying supermercada. So are there two different gender forms of this word? (Or am I just hearing it wrong?)


Obrigado,


Frank

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PortuguesePod101.com
Friday at 9:57 am
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Oi Laderon,


Yes, "A mãe de vocês é muito legal" is totally fine. :smile:

I guess we tend to use "de vocês" because it explicitly refers to you (plural). If you use "seu" or "sua" it might be confusing if you're referring to one person, the group, or his, hers, or theirs!


Same happens in sentences like:

Maria gosta da sua casa porque tem piscina. (the house that has a pool can be yours or hers). In this case, "sua" usually refers to yours. To say "hers", than the phrase:

"Maria gosta da casa dela porque tem piscina." would be better.


That's a little confusing, so if you want to be 100% sure people understood you, it's better to say "de (person)" :sunglasses:


Let me know if you have more questions!

Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101

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Laderon
Thursday at 2:59 pm
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Oh, yes it helps a lot. Look, this is a common problem for learning, when you take a text book they tell you one thing, but the reality is usually different. So now I know.

I'm just curious 'de vocês' is a kind of absolute possessive pronoun, like yours. So if I connot use it like this, what should I put: your mom is very cool = a mãe de vocês é moitu legal (is still OK)?

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PortuguesePod101.com
Thursday at 2:40 pm
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Oi Laderon!


In Brazil, we use "você" for you (singular) and "vocês for you (plural).

"Vós", or "vosso", can still be heard in some country areas by elderly people, but it's outdated and rarely used by young people.

So, for "is it your ball, boys?" would be:

"Essa bola é de vocês, moços?"

"boys" could be translated as "meninos" or "garotos" too.

"É sua bola, moços?" is not wrong, but it doesn't sound as natural.


I hope it helps!

Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101

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Laderon
Thursday at 1:29 pm
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Oi a todus!

I just wonder if the form VÓS is out of use in Brazil, how do you say YOUR (for you all):

like in - is it your ball, boys?

would you say: É sua bola, moços? or É vossa bola, moços?