Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Thássia: Bom dia!
Braden: Braden here! This is Absolute Beginner Season 1, Lesson 13 - A Meaty Situation in Brazil. In this lesson, we'll focus on the words "este," "estes," "esta," and "estas."
Thássia: This conversation is between Rita and the waiter as she looks at the menu. This conversation takes place at a restaurant.
Braden: The speakers are not friends so they will be speaking formally.
Thássia: Let's listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

(Formal)
Rita: Este aqui, o que é?
Garçom: Este é carne com vegetais.
Rita: E estes aqui?
Garçom: Estes são pratos vegetarianos.
Rita: Oh...
Braden:One time slowly.
(Formal)
Rita: Este aqui, o que é?
Garçom: Este é carne com vegetais.
Rita: E estes aqui?
Garçom: Estes são pratos vegetarianos.
Rita: Oh...
Braden:One time fast with translation.
(Formal)
Rita: Este aqui, o que é?
Braden: This one here, what is this?
Garçom: Este é carne com vegetais.
Braden: This is meat with vegetables.
Rita: E estes aqui?
Braden: And these here?
Garçom: Estes são pratos vegetarianos.
Braden: These are vegetarian dishes.
Rita: Oh...
Braden: Oh...
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Brade: Rita's reaction to the vegetarian dishes makes me laugh.
Thássia: We Brazilians do love our meat.
Braden: It's in your culture, it's in your history; from steak houses to street vendors, it's everywhere.
Thássia: What can I say, we have sensitive palates.
Braden: That's for sure. The Brazilian "style of barbecue," called "churrasco," is world famous.
Thássia: "Churrasco" comes from the South part of Brazil, from the gaúchos.
Braden: Do you know what I found out about cows in Brazil?
Thássia: What?
Braden: According to the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics, there are more cattle in Brazil than people. That's over two hundred million head of cattle.
Thássia: That’s a lot of "churrasco!"
Braden: That's over 200 million head of cattle. Let's take a look at the vocabulary.
VOCAB LIST
The first word we shall see is…
Thássia: Este [natural native speed]
Braden: This
Thássia: Este [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Este [natural native speed]
Braden: Next is…
Thássia: Esta [natural native speed]
Braden: This
Thássia: Esta [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Esta [natural native speed]
Braden: Next, we have…
Thássia: Garçom [natural native speed]
Braden: Waiter
Thássia: Garçom [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Garçom [natural native speed]
Braden: Next is…
Thássia: Prato [natural native speed]
Braden: Plate, dish
Thássia: Prato [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Prato [natural native speed]
Braden: Our next word is…
Thássia: Estes [natural native speed]
Braden: These
Thássia: Estes [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Estes [natural native speed]
Braden: And our last word is…
Thássia: Estas [natural native speed]
Braden: These
Thássia: Estas [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Estas [natural native speed]
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Thássia: Okay. The first phrase we’ll look at is "pratos vegetarianos," which means "vegetarian dishes."
Braden: More specifically, we'll be looking at adjectives and how they work in Portuguese.
Thássia: Adjectives specify or narrow the meaning of nouns.
Braden: In English, we almost always put adjectives before the noun.
Thássia: In Portuguese, we almost always put the adjectives after the noun.
Braden: For me, this was very strange when I first started learning Portuguese. Everything felt backward and I often put the adjectives in the wrong place.
Thássia: That's how I felt when I first started learning English. "Sign green" made perfect sense but "green sign" blew some mental fuses.
Braden: But, don't worry, this starts making sense quickly.
Thássia: We should also tell them that adjectives in Portuguese also need to be pluralized just like the nouns.
Braden: That's right. So, "one vegetarian dish" is…
Thássia: "Um prato vegetarian."
Braden: But "two vegetarian dishes" is…
Thássia: "Dois pratos vegetarianos."
Braden: The adjective, "vegetarianos," needs to be plural as well. This does not happen in English.
Thássia: So practicing will be very helpful.
Braden: Also, listening carefully to the natives and copying the way they speak makes adjectives very easy. Let's take a look at the grammar point.

Lesson focus

Thássia: In this lesson, we'll focus on the words "este," "estes," "esta," and "estas."
Braden: So, what's the difference between the words "este" and "estes?"
Thássia: Well, "este" and "estes" are paired words just like "this" and "these," and the difference is plurality.
Braden: That's right. "Este" is used when you have a single thing close to you, probably in your hands or within reach, like in the phrase "Este relógio," which translates to "This clock."
Thássia: "Estes" with an "-s" at the end, means "these." The phrase "Estes sapatos" translates to "These shoes."
Braden: Now, it's also important to remember that, because of grammatical gender, there are also feminine forms of "este" and "estes."
Thássia: Which are "esta" and "estas."
Braden: That's right. "Esta" means "this," and "estas" means "these."
Thássia: The difference is that "esta" and "estas" are used exclusively for feminine words.
Braden: And "este" and "estes" are used exclusively with masculine words. That just about does it for this lesson.
Thássia: Ready to test what you've just learned?
Braden: Make this lesson vocabulary stick by using the lesson specific flashcards.
Thássia: There is a reason everyone uses flashcards.
Braden: They work.
Thássia: They really do help memorization.
Braden: You can get the flashcard for this lesson at…
Thássia: PortoguesePod101.com.
Braden: Thanks for listening.
Thesis: Até amanhã!

Grammar

Portuguese Grammar Made Easy - Unlock This Lesson’s Grammar Guide

Easily master this lesson’s grammar points with in-depth explanations and examples. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

17 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍
Sorry, please keep your comment under 800 characters. Got a complicated question? Try asking your teacher using My Teacher Messenger.

PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Having trouble with this site? Watch our user guides! They are very helpful. https://www.portuguesepod101.com/help-center/video-user-guides/

PortuguesePod101.com
Sunday at 6:43 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Lydia,


Thank you for your message.


Please check out our grammar point on demonstrative pronouns:

https://www.portuguesepod101.com/learningcenter/reference/grammar/14?

We use “esta” (this, feminine) or “este” (this, masculine) to refer to things close to the person speaking and “essa” (that, feminine) or “esse” (that, masculine) to refer to things close to the person being spoken to.

As for "estas", "estes", "essas", "esses" have the above meaning, but in the plural form.


Hope this helps! For more details, please check out our http://www.PortuguesePod101.com/myteacher


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Lydia
Wednesday at 4:17 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Oi! Tudo bem? Eu tenho uma pergunta. Qual é a diferença entre esse e este, essa e esta, esses e estes, e essas e estas? Muito obrigada! Beijos beijos beijos!

PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Thursday at 9:01 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Zhuldyzay,


In the dialogue, "este" is used as a reference to "prato" (dish), that's why it uses "este" instead of "isto".


Examples:

"esta casa" (this house)

"este portão" (this gate)

"este gato" (this cat)


However, "isto" is used when we refer to something more general, unknown, as in "O que quer dizer isto?" / ("What does it mean?")


Please check out our Grammar bank for more details:

https://www.portuguesepod101.com/learningcenter/reference/grammar/14?


In case of any questions, please don't hesitate to contact us.


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Zhuldyzay
Tuesday at 10:42 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

continue my question


for example the question "o que é isto?" means that "what is this"

Zhuldyzay
Tuesday at 10:32 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

hello


I would like to ask, why in the frase "Este aqui, o que é?", we have to use "este" and not "isto", "isto" is used for unidentified object and in the frase we have unidentified object and that why we ask a question.

Portuguesepod101.comVerified
Wednesday at 7:54 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Musaab,


Thank you for commenting and for your positive feedback!


Please let us know if you have any doubts :)


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team Portuguesepod101.com

Musaab
Wednesday at 5:39 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

very simple and nice

muito obrigado

PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 10:22 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Derek,


Camarão na moranga é mesmo delicioso! Qual outro prato brasileiro você gosta?

Camarão na moranga is very delicious! What other Brazilian dishes do you like?


Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101

Derek
Sunday at 5:21 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Camarao na Moranga e delicioso!

Braden
Thursday at 9:41 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Andy!


First of all, all linguists agree that it is possible. Children grow up in bi-lingual environments and learn both languages equally well, simultaneously. However, there is usually a delay in both languages.


Since, I assume, you are not a child linguists have many conflicting opinions. In general though, if you have enough time to focus on two different languages then you can do it. For example, if you only have 30 min per day for language study and you try to fit two languages into that space, it will probably not work. Like spreading too little butter on too much bread.


If you take those same thirty minutes and focus them on only one language the probability of learning that language is much higher.


However, if you had 18 hours per day to do nothing but study language (is that possible?) you could theoretically learn as many as 9 languages simultaneously, provided you're able to sort through all that information.


Hope that helps!