Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Thássia: Oi pessoal.
Braden: Braden here! This is Absolute Beginner Season 1, Lesson 10 - It's All Brazilian History. Hello and welcome back to PortuguesePod101.com, the fastest, easiest and most fun way to learn Portuguese! I'm joined in the studio by...
Thássia: Thássia. Hello everyone.
Braden: In this lesson, we'll cover grammatical gender.
Thássia: This conversation takes place in front of a snack shop.
Braden: And it's between Michael and Mariana.
Thássia: They are friends; so they'll be speaking informally. Let's have a listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

(Informal)
Michael: É este o lugar, Mariana?
Mariana: Sim, é esta a lanchonete.
Michael: Eu estou cansada e com sede. Você quer tomar um suco?
Mariana: Michael, se diz, "eu estou cansado," porque você é homem. E sim, um suco seria ótimo.
Braden:One time slowly.
(Informal)
Michael: É este o lugar, Mariana?
Mariana: Sim, é esta a lanchonete.
Michael: Eu estou cansada e com sede. Você quer tomar um suco?
Mariana: Michael, se diz, "eu estou cansado," porque você é homem. E sim, um suco seria ótimo.
Braden:One time, natural native speed with translation.
Michael: É este o lugar, Mariana?
Braden: Is this the place, Mariana?
Mariana: Sim, é esta a lanchonete.
Braden: Yes, this is the snack shop.
Michael: Eu estou cansada e com sede. Você quer tomar um suco?
Braden: I am tired and thirsty. Do you want some juice?
Mariana: Michael, se diz, "eu estou cansado," porque você é homem. E sim, um suco seria ótimo.
Braden: You should say "I am tired," because you are a man. And yes, a juice would be great.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Thássia: In the rush of the day, gender is often easy to forget. Did you have that problem, Braden?
Braden: Yes. Especially when I wasn't sure about the gender of the word I was using.
Thássia: It's very normal for Brazilian children to mess up on the gender of words when they are learning Portuguese.
Braden: What makes gender hard is that there isn't really any pattern you can follow to know if a word is masculine or feminine. Sure, there are a few guidelines and suggestions you can use to guess, but nothing that you can really trust.
Thássia: Yes, you have to learn to feel it. Sometimes I don't know the gender of a word but I can stop and kind of "fill out" the word in my mind and figure out if it is masculine or feminine.
Braden: Man. I wish I could do that.
Thássia: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Braden: The first word we shall see is…
Thássia: Descansar [natural native speed]
Braden: To rest
Thássia: Descansar [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Descansar [natural native speed]
Braden: Next, we have…
Thássia: ótimo [natural native speed]
Braden: Great.
Thássia: ótimo [slowly - broken down by syllable. ótimo [natural native speed]
Braden: Next is…
Thássia: Casa [natural native speed]
Braden: Couse
Thássia: Casa [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Casa [natural native speed]
Braden: Next…
Thássia: Cansado [natural native speed]
Braden: Tired
Thássia: Cansado [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Cansado [natural native speed]
Braden: And last, we have…
Thássia: Homem [natural native speed]
Braden: Man.
Thássia: Homem [slowly - broken down by syllable]. Homem [natural native speed].
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Braden: Let's take a look at the words and phrases for this lesson.
Braden: The phrase we’re going to look at in this lesson is....
Thássia: "Eu estou cansado."
Braden: Which means "I am tired." That's a phrase I use every day because in Brazil, it's very hot.
Thássia: Exactly, right after a big lunch and its ninety-five degrees outside. I get very "cansada" too.
Brade: In the dialogue, Michael said "Eu estou cansada." So why did Mariana correct him?
Thássia: That's because he said "cansada." This word means "tired" but it indicates that the speaker is a women.
Braden: Ah that's right!
Thássia: As with the majority of Portuguese adjectives, there are both masculine and feminine forms of the word "cansado."
Braden: That means that if you are a guy, you say…
Thássia: "Eu estou cansado."
Braden: And if you are a girl, then you say…
Thássia: "Eu estou cansada." Usually, when you are talking about people, an "-o" at the end of a word indicates a man and an "-a" at the end of a word indicates a woman.
Braden: That's true. In a very broad sense, an "-o" at the end of any noun indicates that that noun is masculine.
Thássia: And if there is an "-a" at the end of a noun then it is a feminine word.
Braden: There are many, many exceptions to this so it's good to check a dictionary. Or you can always ask one of your Brazilian friends; trust me, they'll know.
Thássia: Let's take a look at today's grammar point.

Lesson focus

Braden: The focus of this lesson is grammatical gender.
Thássia: In the dialogue, we heard Mariana correct Michael's use of grammatical gender.
Braden: That's right. Grammatical gender is a pretty intricate part of Portuguese so we decided to explain a bit about it first, before we teach you how to use it.
Thássia: Because understanding always precedes learning, the key thing you need to remember about grammatical gender is that it is an attribute of grammar and not necessarily a reflection of reality.
Braden: For example, the word…
Thássia: "Livro"
Braden: Is a masculine word that means "book." But that doesn't mean that only men can use it or that books are only for men or anything like that.
Thássia: That's right. Women use masculine words in the same way that men do and men use feminine words in the same way women do.
Braden: It's also worth mentioning that grammatical gender is not the same thing as gender relations.
Thássia: To a Brazilian, the grammatical gender is just grammar.
Braden: Okay, let's get on with a story.
Thássia: Yes. Once upon a time, there was a people who decided to organize their daily tasks according to who did what.
Braden: Male tasks became masculine words and things that women did were feminine words.
Thássia: Women would work with the "house" ("casa" - feminine), a feminine word, with the "children" ("crianças" –feminine), another feminine word, and at the "table" ("mesa" –feminine), one more feminine word.
Braden: The men would work out in the "field" ("campo" – masculine), masculine word, they would read "books" ("livros" – masculine), another masculine word, and take care of the "government" ("governo" – masculine), another masculine word. Then those people became the Romans and they called their language Latin.
Thássia: Their lives quickly became much more complicated.
Braden: Women began reading books and men started making food, and the simple divisions they'd created no longer worked.
Thássia: Now, over two thousand years later, Portuguese has remnants of this convoluted system of masculine and feminine.
Braden: It probably made a lot of sense three thousand years ago but now it's just a relic of an ancient time.
Thássia: Like spelling in English.
Braden: Exactly like spelling in English. Why do some words need two "-m's"? Or why is "enough" spelled "-e-n-o-u-g-h" instead of "-e-n-u-f?" There's no reason for it. It's because of similar linguistic baggage.
Thássia: I bet you didn't expect story time could be so intellectual did you?
Braden: I certainly didn't. That just about does it for today.
Thássia: Okay. Some of our listeners already know about the most powerful tool on PortuguesePod101.com.
Braden: Line-by-line audio.
Thássia: The perfect tool for rapidly improving listening comprehension.
Braden: By listening to lines of the conversation again and again.
Thássia: Listen until every word and syllable becomes clear. Basically we break down the dialogue into comprehensible byte size sentences.
Braden: You can try the line-by-line audio at PortuguesePod101.com. See you tomorrow.
Thássia: Até amanhã!

Grammar

Portuguese Grammar Made Easy - Unlock This Lesson’s Grammar Guide

Easily master this lesson’s grammar points with in-depth explanations and examples. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

14 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍
Sorry, please keep your comment under 800 characters. Got a complicated question? Try asking your teacher using My Teacher Messenger.

PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Did you like the story?

Rhoda Champlin
Friday at 4:14 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

The story was nice. The feminine and masculine differences definitely makes Portuguese more complicated and thereby more challenging. But where would life be without a little challenge to it!! This was very helpful though!


Obrigada!


Sincerely,

Rhoda

PortuguesePod101.com
Sunday at 9:28 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Marcus,


Thank you for leaving the comment.


If you have any questions, please let us know.


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Marcus
Saturday at 2:55 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

I like intellectual insight! 😄😄😄❤️️

PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Saturday at 4:00 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Olá Ann-Marie Petty,


Thank you for your message.


Please check out the [Dialogue] tab, it has both [Portuguese] and [English] scripts. In [Vocabulary] you also have the words/sentences in Portuguese with the English translation.


We hope this helps! In case of any questions, please don't hesitate to contact us.


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Ann-Marie Petty
Saturday at 5:03 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

This lesson does not have Portuguese translations - the entire page is in English! Not very helpful.

Portuguesepod101.comVerified
Monday at 3:58 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Oi Alkan


Thank you for your message.


That's very good. Keep up the good work.


In case of any questions, we're here to help

:wink:


Cristiane

Team Portuguesepod101.com

Alkan
Sunday at 8:11 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Otimo! I had a lot of fun learning this lesson :)


Eu nao estou cansado:)

PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Thursday at 9:31 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Oi Kevin,


Nice question!

Portuguese is a flexible language, so sometimes it's possible to move the words in the sentences without changing its meaning.

That's the case of the sentence you just pointed out. Both ways are correct, and are commonly used.


Hope it helps!

Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Kevin Garnett
Saturday at 4:29 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

I have a question.

In the second line, Mariana responds by saying

"Sim, é esta a lanchonete."


Why wouldn't she have said

"Sim, esta é a lanchonete." ?

PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Friday at 12:54 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Oi Suri,


Obrigada pelo comentário!

Tenho certeza que o seu espanhol vai te ajudar a melhorar o seu português.

I'm sure your Spanish will help you improve a lot your Portuguese.

Especially writing in both languages is similar. Please be careful with pronunciation though, that changes a little more.

But of course, if you have any questions, just let us know!

Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101.com