Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Braden: Hello, and welcome to PortuguesePOD101.com, the fastest, easiest, and most fun way to learn Portuguese!
Camila: I'm Camila, and thanks again for being here with us for this Lower Intermediate S1 lesson.
Thássia: So Braden, please tell us what we will be learning in this lesson.
Braden: In this lesson, you'll be learning how to construct compound nouns in Portuguese.
Thássia: Where does this conversation take place and who is it between?
Braden: This conversation takes place late night in a parked car.
Thássia: What's the formality level?
Braden: Well, the speakers are just leaving the bar and some are drunk so they'll be speaking informally.
Thássia: Let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
(portas abrindo,portas fechando)
(portas abrindo,portas fechando)
Allisson: Todo mundo colocou o cinto?
---: (sim, sim, sim)
Allisson: André, põe o cinto.
André: Por quê?
Allisson: Porque eu tô falando seu bêbado. É lei.
André: Mas não vai ter fiscalização.
Allisson: E como você sabe, heim? Você é policial?
André: Não. É que nunca tem daqui pra casa.
Allisson: Ai ai, põe o cinto! E me dá o documento do carro.
(click)
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Allisson: Todo mundo colocou o cinto?
---: (sim, sim, sim)
Allisson: André, põe o cinto.
André: Por quê?
Allisson: Porque eu tô falando seu bêbado. É lei.
André: Mas não vai ter fiscalização.
Allisson: E como você sabe, heim? Você é policial?
André: Não. É que nunca tem daqui pra casa.
Allisson: Ai ai, põe o cinto! E me dá o documento do carro.
(click)
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
(portas abrindo,portas fechando)
Braden(doors opening, doors closing)
Allisson: Todo mundo colocou o cinto?
Braden: Everybody got their seat belt on?
---: (sim, sim, sim)
Braden: (sim, sim, sim)
Allisson: André, põe o cinto.
Braden: André, put your seat belt on.
André: Por quê?
Braden: Why?
Allisson: Porque eu tô falando seu bêbado. É lei.
Braden: Because I'm telling you to—you're drunk. It's the law.
André: Mas não vai ter fiscalização.
Braden: But there won't be any police inspections.
Allisson: E como você sabe, heim? Você é policial?
Braden: And how would you know? Are you a police man?
André: Não. É que nunca tem daqui pra casa.
Braden: No. It's that there never is between here and my house.
Allisson: Ai ai, põe o cinto! E me dá o documento do carro.
Braden: Oh my! Put on your seat belt. And give me the car document.
(click)
Braden(click)
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
(Peter always does a little review about the previous lessons. explain what you are thinking about the storyline in the lesson, so the students can follow and participate - don't make them guess.)
Braden: Navigating a new culture is always a difficult thing to do and with language it's even more important.
Thássia: Our grammar point for this lesson is the imperative or command form.
Braden: This a verb conjugation that is very important to know to read and write Portuguese but in spoken Brazilian Portuguese, the command form is rarely used.
Thássia: This is because it often sounds rude, as if you are ordering people around.
Braden: Brazilians often ignore the command form (knowing it’s the correct verb form) in favor of the standard conjugation for social reasons. When you're a foreigner, culture always wins over grammar.
VOCAB LIST
Braden: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Camila: passageiro [natural native speed]
Braden: passenger
Camila: passageiro [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Camila: passageiro [natural native speed]
: Next:
Camila: volante [natural native speed]
Braden: steering wheel
Camila: volante [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Camila: volante [natural native speed]
: Next:
Camila: cinto de segurança [natural native speed]
Braden: seat belt
Camila: cinto de segurança [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Camila: cinto de segurança [natural native speed]
: Next:
Camila: banco [natural native speed]
Braden: seat
Camila: banco [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Camila: banco [natural native speed]
: Next:
Camila: motorista [natural native speed]
Braden: driver
Camila: motorista [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Camila: motorista [natural native speed]
: Next:
Camila: carona [natural native speed]
Braden: hitchhiking, lift, ride
Camila: carona [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Camila: carona [natural native speed]
: Next:
Camila: pôr [natural native speed]
Braden: to put, to place, to lay
Camila: pôr [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Camila: pôr [natural native speed]
: Next:
Camila: trava elétrica [natural native speed]
Braden: power locks
Camila: trava elétrica [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Camila: trava elétrica [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Braden: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Thássia: In this lesson we’ll look at some of the usages of the word seu.
Braden: In previous lessons, we learned one meaning of seu, which was "your" when talking about possession.
Thássia: In the dialogue for this lesson, we saw Alisson use it with another meaning - "you." When Alisson said seu bêbado it had almost the exact same meaning and usage as “you drunkard” in English.
Braden: Seu can also has another meaning as “sir” or “mister” when placed before a noun, for exemple seu Lopes means “Mr. Lopes”
Thássia: The next word we’ll look at is Cinto de segurança which literally translates to “belt of security” or “belt of saftey” and the Portuguese word for “belt” is cinto.
Braden: But in the dialogue we heard the speakers just say cinto to mean “seatbelt.” Since they were in the car there is the inferred meaning that they were talking about a specific cinto, the cinto de segurança or “seatbelt.”

Lesson focus

Braden: What’s the focus of this lesson?
Thássia: The focus of this lesson is the -or verb pôr. In the dialogue we heard the phrase “André, põe o cinto.”
Braden: Which we translated as "André, put on your belt.” This is an example of the verb pôr.
Thássia: The verb pôr means “to put” or “to put on” and is an -or verb. -Or verbs are different from the normal -ar, -er, and -ir verbs we have learned so far.
Braden: That’s right. Pôr is conjugated in the present tense as follows
Thássia: Eu ponho
Braden: you put
Thássia: você põe
Braden: he/she/it puts
Thássia: ele or ela põe
Braden: we put
Thássia: nós pomos
Braden: vocês põem
Thássia: y’all put
Braden: they put
Thássia: eles põem
Braden: awesome. So is pôr the only -or verb in Portuguese?
Thássia: There are few -or verbs in Portuguese. Other -or verbs include supor (to suppose), impor (to impose), dispor (to dispose, to make use), propor (to propose), and compor (to compose).
Braden: If you look closely, all those -or verbs are, in fact, -por verbs and all follow the same conjugation pattern as pôr.
Thássia: So with the verb supor you get Nós supomos que sim. - "We suppose so.”
Braden: and with the verb dispor (which is a very complicated verb) you get Eles dispõem dos conselhos da presidente Dilma. - “The have at their disposal the counsels of president Dilma.
Thássia: Some examples from the dialogue are “André, põe o cinto.” – “André, put on your belt.”
Braden: and Ai ai, ponha o cinto! – “Oh my! Put on your belt.” -
Thássia: Our language tip for this lesson is about the verb “to put.”
Braden: That’s right. There are three verbs in Portuguese that mean “to put” - pôr, colocar and botar.
Thássia: Colocar and botar are both regular verbs. Botar is most used in northern Brazil and colocar is used in the southern part of Brazil. Pôr is used everywhere but since it’s a more difficult conjugation, usually only educated people use it.

11 Comments

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PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 6:30 pm
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What did Alisson ask them to do?

PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Monday at 9:19 pm
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Oi Jonathan,


Thanks for letting us know the issue.

It should be "põem". We've already fixed the PDF.


Let us know if you have any questions!

Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Jonathan
Thursday at 2:22 pm
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It says in the PDF chart that the third person plural of pôr is põe. Is this correct?

PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 10:07 am
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Oi Asbjørn,


Obrigada pelo comentário!


Haha! É verdade, o André parece mais sóbrio que o Allison!


No seu país, tem muitos acidentes de carro com pessoas embriagadas (drunk)?

Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Asbjørn
Sunday at 10:06 pm
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Desculpa...Allison parece mais bêbado com aquela voz estranha! :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:

Asbjørn
Sunday at 10:03 pm
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Acho que André parece mais bêbado do que Allisson! Rsrsrsrs :grin:

PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Monday at 10:55 am
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Hi Bob!


Yes, you are right, Allison in English is a feminine name.

In Latin America however many names that end with -on, are male names, like Wilson, Milton and more :smile:


Stefania,

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Bob
Tuesday at 5:19 am
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Allison disse que os passageiros devem usar os cintos de segurança. A proposito, no Canada, Allison é um nome para mulheres.

PortuguesePod101.comVerified
Monday at 6:11 pm
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Oi Eva,


Obrigada pelo comentário, e desculpa o erro. Já fizemos upload da transcrição do áudio para essa aula.


Sua frase está bem formal e quase correta: "Allison pediu-lhes que ponha os cintos".

Uma forma mais coloquial seria: "Allison pediu para eles porem (ou colocarem) os cintos".


Great job! Parabéns!

If you have any Portuguese questions, please let us know!


Paloma

Team PortuguesePod101.com

Eva
Sunday at 5:43 am
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Allison pidiu-lhes por os cintos.

Eva
Sunday at 5:31 am
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Porque nao tem audio com "audio transcript" na esta aula?