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How To Post In Perfect Portuguese on Social Media

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You’re learning to speak Portuguese, and it’s going well. Your confidence is growing! So much so that you feel ready to share your experiences on social media—in Portuguese.

At Learn Portuguese, we make this easy for you to get it right the first time. Post like a boss with these phrases and guidelines, and get to practice your Portuguese in the process.

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1. Talking about Your Restaurant Visit in Brazilian Portuguese

Eating out is fun, and often an experience you’d like to share. Take a pic, and start a conversation on social media in Portuguese. Your friend will be amazed by your language skills…and perhaps your taste in restaurants!

Eduardo eats at a restaurant with his friends, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

POST

Let’s break down Eduardo’s post.

Esperando o pedido. Que fome!
“Waiting for the order. I’m so hungry!”

1- Esperando o pedido.

First is an expression meaning “Waiting for the order.”
Pedido (”order” ) here is used as a noun. But it can also be an adjective (”ordered or asked” ), or even a verb. So, pay attention to the context.

2- Que fome!

Then comes the phrase - “I’m so hungry!”
This is the informal, common way of saying you’re hungry, without adding the subject. It’s similar to “such a hunger.” You can use it to talk about other people’s hunger, too.

COMMENTS

In response, Eduardo’s friends leave some comments.

1- Pena que não pude ir…

His girlfriend, Luiza, uses an expression meaning - “Too bad I couldn’t go…”
Luiza is feeling wistful and expresses a regret that she wasn’t at the restaurant.

2- Fiquei com água na boca!

His neighbor, Gabriela, uses an expression meaning - “It made my mouth water!”
Gabriela is commenting on the food in the photo to stay part of the conversation.

3- Vai se acabar de comer hoje, hein?

His college friend, Lucas, uses an expression meaning - “Gonna eat until you drop today, huh?”
Lucas is commenting in a teasing, joking way.

4- Bom apetite!

His supervisor, Paulo, uses an expression meaning - “Enjoy your food!”
This is a commonly-used well wish, slightly old fashioned.

VOCABULARY

Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • pedido: “order”
  • fome: “hunger”
  • pena: “pity”
  • apetite: “appetite”
  • esperar: “to wait”
  • hein: “huh”
  • comer: “to eat”
  • So, let’s practice a bit. If a friend posted something about having dinner with friends, which phrase would you use?

    Now go visit a Portuguese restaurant, and wow everyone with your language skills!

    2. Post about Your Mall Visit in Brazilian Portuguese

    Another super topic for social media is shopping—everybody does it, most everybody loves it, and your friends on social media are probably curious about your shopping sprees! Share these Portuguese phrases in posts when you visit a mall.

    Luiza shops with her sister at the mall, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Luiza’s post.

    Fazendo compras com a minha irmã querida! Estava com saudades!
    “Going shopping with my dear sister! I was missing her!”

    1- Fazendo compras

    First is an expression meaning “Going shopping.”
    Fazer compras means to go shopping. It shouldn’t be confused with the gerund “comprando” which means “the act of buying”.

    2- Estava com saudades (dela)!

    Then comes the phrase - “I was missing her!”
    “Estar com saudades” is used to express that you miss someone.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Luiza’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Que gostoso, divirtam-se! Beijos para as duas.

    Her neighbor, Gabriela, uses an expression meaning - “How delightful. Have fun! Kisses to both of you.”
    This is fun, warmhearted commentary on Luiza’s restaurant excursion.

    2- Causando no shopping!

    Her high school friend, Helena, uses an expression meaning - “Raising hell at the mall!”
    Helena comments lightheartedly, and teasing Luizia to be part of the conversation,

    3- Me avise se precisarem de carona.

    Her boyfriend, Eduardo, uses an expression meaning - “Let me know if you need a ride.”
    Considerate Eduardo expresses his caring by offering Luiza a ride.

    4- Vocês realmente precisam de mais roupas?

    Her nephew, André, uses an expression meaning - “Do you really need more clothes?”
    André is not a very optimistic, friendly nephew, is he? He complains indirectly about Luiza’s spending habits.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • saudade: “longing, missing, yearning”
  • avisar: “to tell”
  • shopping: “mall”
  • carona: “ride”
  • compra: “shopping, purchase”
  • precisar: “to need”
  • realmente:”really”
  • So, if a friend posted something about going shopping, which phrase would you use?

    3. Talking about a Sport Day in Brazilian Portuguese

    Sport events, whether you’re the spectator or the sports person, offer fantastic opportunity for great social media posts. Learn some handy phrases and vocabulary to start a sport-on-the-beach conversation in Portuguese.

    Eduardo plays with his friends at the beach, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eduardo’s post.

    Vôlei na praia com o pessoal, a melhor parte das férias!
    “Volleyball on the beach with the guys, the best part of vacation!”

    1- Vôlei na praia com o pessoal

    First is an expression meaning “Volleyball on the beach with the guys.”
    Vôlei na praia means “volley on the beach,” not to be confused with vôlei de praia, which means “beach volleyball,” the official sport. When followed by the masculine article o, the noun pessoal always means “the guys, folks, etc.” In other situations, it means “personal, private, staff”.

    2- a melhor parte das férias

    Then comes the phrase - “the best part of the vacation”
    Férias is only used in the plural form. There is no singular form, and the rest of the sentence should follow it’s plural condition.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eduardo’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Aproveite bem suas férias e volte descansado. Abraços.

    His supervisor, Paulo, uses an expression meaning - “Enjoy your vacation and come back well rested. Hugs.”
    A slightly old-fashioned comment, this is nevertheless warmhearted and sincere.

    2- Jogando vôlei? Vê se volta inteiro!

    His college friend, Lucas, uses an expression meaning - “Playing volleyball? Come back in one piece.”
    Lucas is joking about Eduardo’s sport abilities.

    3- Também quero! Me chama!

    His high school friend, Lígia, uses an expression meaning - “I want to play too! Ask me!”
    This friend wants to be part of the action. A lighthearted comment and expression of a wish.

    4- Vôlei, tem certeza? Aposto que vai acabar jogando futevôlei…

    His girlfriend’s nephew, André, uses an expression meaning - “Volleyball, are you sure? I bet you’ll end up playing footvolley…”
    André clearly doesn’t have much faith in Eduardo’s sport talent.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • abraço: “hug”
  • pessoal: “folks, guys”
  • férias: “vacation, holiday”
  • inteiro: “whole”
  • certeza: “assurance, certainty”
  • futevôlei: “footvolley”
  • descansado: “rested”
  • Which phrase would you use if a friend posted something about sports?

    But sport is not the only thing you can play! Play some music, and share it on social media.

    4. Share a Song on Social Media in Brazilian Portuguese

    Music is the language of the soul, they say. So, don’t hold back—share what touches your soul with your friends!

    Luiza shares a song she just heard at a party, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Luiza’s post.

    E quando tocam sua música preferida na festa? Me emocionei.
    “What about your favorite song being played at the party? I’m touched.”

    1- E quando tocam sua música preferida na festa?

    First is an expression meaning “What about your favorite song being played at the party? .”
    This can also be translated as “and when they play your favorite song at the party?” Música can refer to “music” as a whole, but also to a song, which is the case here. So you can have the plural músicas to say “songs”.

    2- Me emocionei.

    Then comes the phrase - “I was moved..”
    It means you were “moved, touched” emotionally.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Luiza’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Não chora para não borrar a maquiagem!

    Her high school friend, Helena, uses an expression meaning - “Don’t cry or you’ll ruin your makeup!”
    Girlie advice that’s also a bit funny.

    2- A festa parece ótima. Divirta-se.

    Her supervisor, Paulo, uses an expression meaning - “The party sounds great. Have a good time.”
    A standard comment wish that’s safe to use, if not a bit old fashioned.

    3- Não sabia que você gostava desta banda. É a minha favorita!

    Her boyfriend’s high school friend, Lígia, uses an expression meaning - “I didn’t know you liked this band. They’re my favorite!”
    Eduardo’s friend is making conversation by sharing a bit of personal information.

    4- Estou chegando daqui a pouco!

    Her boyfriend, Eduardo, uses an expression meaning - “I’ll be there soon!”
    Eduardo lets Luiza know that he will be joining her.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • música: “song”
  • preferido: “favorite”
  • emocionar: “to touch, to move (emotionally)”
  • maquiagem: “makeup”
  • tocar: “to play”
  • festa: “party”
  • chorar: “to cry”
  • Which song would you share? And what would you say to a friend who posted something about sharing music or videos?

    Now you know how to start a conversation about a song or a video on social media!

    5. Brazilian Portuguese Social Media Comments about a Concert

    Still on the theme of music—visiting live concerts and shows just have to be shared with your friends. Here are some handy phrases and vocab to wow your followers in Portuguese!

    Eduardo goes to a concert, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eduardo’s post.

    O show finalmente começou!
    “The show’s finally started!”

    1- O show

    First is an expression meaning “The concert.”
    In Portuguese, show generally means a musical concert. It isn’t used to refer to a TV show, like in English. It can also be used as an adjective meaning “awesome, great”.

    2- finalmente começou

    Then comes the phrase - “has finally started.”
    Finalmente is a regular time adverb, so it modifies the following verb by giving it an end. It can be used just like “finally” and “at last.” So, here, it modifies the verb “started” (começou).

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eduardo’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Grava aquela música que eu adoro?

    His college friend, Lucas, uses an expression meaning - “Please, record that song that I love!”
    Lucas is requesting a favor from Eduardo regarding a particular song.

    2- Não acredito que não consegui comprar o ingresso a tempo…

    His girlfriend, Luiza, uses an expression meaning - “I can’t believe I couldn’t buy a ticket in time…”
    Luiza is regretful that she’s missing out on this action.

    3- Eles são demais! Bom show.

    His neighbor, Gabriela, uses an expression meaning - “They’re awesome! Have a nice concert.”
    A sweet, warmhearted comment that wishes the concertgoers the best.

    4- Ainda bem que você não me convidou…

    His girlfriend’s nephew, André, uses an expression meaning - “I’m glad you didn’t invite me…”
    André is a bit of a wet rag, isn’t he? Why would he be so negative about the concert?

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • finalmente: “finally”
  • gravar: “to record”
  • adorar: “to love”
  • ingresso: “ticket”
  • demais: “great”
  • convidar: “to invite”
  • show: “concert”
  • If a friend posted something about a concert , which phrase would you use?

    6. Talking about an Unfortunate Accident in Brazilian Portuguese

    Oh dear. You broke something by accident. Use these Portuguese phrases to start a thread on social media. Or maybe just to let your friends know why you are not contacting them!

    Luiza accidentally breaks her mobile phone, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Luiza’s post.

    Olha o que aconteceu! Ele era novinho…
    “Look what happened! It was brand new…”

    1- Olha o que aconteceu!

    First is an expression meaning “Look what happened!.”
    A common informal phrase to call attention to something that happened.

    2- Ele era novinho…

    Then comes the phrase - “It was brand new…”
    Remember: in Portuguese there’s no equivalent to “it.” “It” is always “she” or “him,” according to the gender of the noun. A cellphone, then, is a “he.” The diminutive here is used to emphasize the quality (”new” ).

    COMMENTS

    In response, Luiza’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ah, por isso você não responde minhas mensagens.

    Her boyfriend, Eduardo, uses an expression meaning - “Oh, that’s why you’re not answering my texts.”
    Eduardo finally understands why he’s not getting reaction from his girlfriend.

    2- Coitada! O que rolou? Espero que você esteja bem!

    Her neighbor, Gabriela, uses an expression meaning - “You poor thing! What happened? I hope you’re okay.”
    Gabriela comments in sympathy and commiseration.

    3- Não se esqueça de ver se a garantia cobre.

    Her supervisor, Paulo, uses an expression meaning - “Don’t forget to check if it’s covered by the warranty.”
    Paulo, ever the responsible person, gives advice to Luiza about insurance.

    4- Parabéns! Mandou bem.

    Her nephew, André, uses an expression meaning - “Bravo! Well done.”
    Here André is sarcastic, and he sounds a bit nasty.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • novinho (novo): “new”
  • acontecer: “to happen”
  • mensagem: “text, message “
  • coitado: “poor thing”
  • garantia: “warranty”
  • cobrir: “to cover”
  • responder: “to answer”
  • If a friend posted something about having broken something by accident, which phrase would you use?

    So, now you know how to describe an accident in Portuguese. Well done!

    7. Chat about Your Boredom on Social Media in Brazilian Portuguese

    Sometimes, we’re just bored with how life goes. And to alleviate the boredom, we write about it on social media. Add some excitement to your posts by addressing your friends and followers in Portuguese!

    Eduardo gets bored at home, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eduardo’s post.

    Vai ter algum rolê interessante hoje? Estou muito bodeado.
    “Is there anything good going on tonight? I’m very bored.”

    1- Vai ter algum rolê interessante hoje?

    First is an expression meaning “Is there anything good going on tonight?.”
    Rolê is a common slang term, especially among millennials. It means “a night out, a date, to take a walk, a drive by.” It’s used as a masculine noun. You say you’re “taking a rolê” - “dar um rolê”. Here, Eduardo is asking if there’s any rolê being planned. In terms of grammar, it’s used exactly as “date” - it can also mean, literally, “a date”.

    2- Estou muito bodeado.

    Then comes the phrase - “I’m very bored..”
    This is a slang adjective, meaning you’re “bored, annoyed, discouraged or bummed out.” It derives from the slang “estar de bode”, which has the same meaning. In this context, it means Eduardo is very bored, as he used the adverb muito (”very” ) to state it.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eduardo’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Vamos beber mais tarde!

    His college friend, Lucas, uses an expression meaning - “Let’s drink later today!”
    Lucas hopes to lift his friends spirit with the idea of having a drink together later.

    2- Ah, amor, não fica triste!

    His girlfriend, Luiza, uses an expression meaning - “Oh, sweetie, don’t be sad!”
    Luiza is sweet and sensitive to her boyfriend.

    3- Se quiser fazer alguma coisa, me dá um toque!

    His high school friend, Lígia, uses an expression meaning - “If you want to hang out, give me a call!”
    Another invitation to alleviate Eduardo’s boredom - he has good friends!

    4- Desculpe, mas hoje a sua namorada é minha!

    His girlfriend’s high school friend, Helena, uses an expression meaning - “I’m sorry, but today your girlfriend is mine!”
    Helena must be reminding Eduardo here of her date with Luiza, which means he, Eduardo, cannot expect Luiza to entertain him later.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • rolê: “a date, a night out, a walk”
  • bodeado: “bored, bummed”
  • interessante: “interesting”
  • triste: “sad”
  • toque: “call; touch”
  • algum: “some, any”
  • coisa: “thing”
  • namorada: “girlfriend”
  • If a friend posted something about being bored, which phrase would you use?

    Still bored? Share another feeling and see if you can start a conversation!

    8. Exhausted? Share It on Social Media in Brazilian Portuguese

    Sitting in public transport after work, feeling like chatting online? Well, converse in Portuguese about how you feel, and let your friends join in!

    Luiza feels exhausted after a long day at work, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Luiza’s post.

    Trabalhar, trabalhar e trabalhar… Cadê o fim de semana?
    “Work, work, work… where’s the weekend?”

    1- Trabalhar, trabalhar e trabalhar…

    First is an expression meaning “Work, work, and work….”
    Although in English the more common use of “work” is as a noun, in Portuguese you use it as a verb in the infinitive. Literally the translation would be “to work, to work, and to work”.

    2- Cadê o fim de semana?

    Then comes the phrase - “Where is the weekend?.”
    Cadê, or “where (is it),” is an informal expression. The more formal equivalent would be onde está (”where is” ), but they mean the same thing. This expression is very common throughout Brazil.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Luiza’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Estou torcendo para ele chegar mais cedo!

    Her high school friend, Helena, uses an expression meaning - “I’m hoping it’ll arrive soon!”
    Helena is generously hoping time will move fast for Luiza.

    2- Nem me fala! Idem.

    Her neighbor, Gabriela, uses an expression meaning - “Tell me about it! Same here.”
    Gabriela comments in sympathy, as she’s also tired of work.

    3- Vamos fazer um happy hour para relaxar!

    Her college friend, Lucas, uses an expression meaning - “Let’s go to a happy hour to relax!”
    With this comment, Lucas is optimistic that they can have a good time together later.

    4- Vem logo para casa! Já estou com saudade.

    Her boyfriend, Eduardo, uses an expression meaning - “Come home quickly! I miss you already.”
    Eduardo comments in a sweet, loving way to his girlfriend.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • trabalhar: “to work”
  • cadê: “where (is it)”
  • fim de semana: “weekend”
  • torcer: “to hope, to cheer; to twist”
  • cedo: “early”
  • relaxar: “to relax”
  • logo: “soon”
  • If a friend posted something about being exhausted, which phrase would you use?

    Now you know how to say you’re exhausted in Portuguese! Well done.

    9. Talking about an Injury in Brazilian Portuguese

    So life happens, and you manage to hurt yourself during a soccer game. Very Tweet-worthy! Here’s how to do it in Portuguese.

    Eduardo suffers a painful injury, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eduardo’s post.

    Desta vez me machuquei mesmo. Sem treinos por algumas semanas.
    “This time I really got injured. No training for a few weeks.”

    1- Desta vez me machuquei mesmo.

    First is an expression meaning “This time I really got injured..”
    Desta is a contraction. The preposition de is combined with the demonstrative pronoun esta, forming desta - which means “this”.

    2- Sem treinos por algumas semanas.

    Then comes the phrase - “No training for a few weeks..”
    Sem means “without” but it’s also used in Portuguese at the beginning of sentences to designate when there isn’t or there won’t be something. So, sem treinos por algumas semanas means “no training for a few weeks.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eduardo’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Uiui.

    His girlfriend’s nephew, André, uses an expression meaning - “Ouch.”
    André sounds uncharacteristically sympathetic here.

    2- Você se recupera rápido! Não vai demorar tudo isso.

    His high school friend, Lígia, uses an expression meaning - “You’ll recover soon! It won’t take that long.”
    This is an optimistic, encouraging comment to lift Eduardo’s spirit.

    3- Espero que não tenha sido nada sério.

    His neighbor, Gabriela, uses an expression meaning - “I hope it wasn’t serious.”
    Gabriela expresses concern here.

    4- Vamos pôr gelo todo dia.

    His girlfriend, Luiza, uses an expression meaning - “We’ll put ice on it every day.”
    Luiza has a plan and will play nurse later on.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • machucar: “to hurt”
  • treino: “training session”
  • semana: “week”
  • esperar: “to hope”
  • gelo: “ice”
  • sério: “serious”
  • recuperar: “to recover”
  • If a friend posted something about being injured, which phrase would you use?

    We love to share our fortunes and misfortunes; somehow that makes us feel connected to others.

    10. Starting a Conversation Feeling Disappointed in Brazilian Portuguese

    Sometimes things don’t go the way we planned. Share your disappointment about this with your friends!

    Luiza feels disappointed about today’s weather, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Luiza’s post.

    Planejamos ir ao parque. Saindo de casa, começou a chover… que sorte.
    “We made plans to go to the park. When we were leaving home, it started to rain…just my luck.”

    1- Planejamos ir ao parque.

    First is an expression meaning “We made plans to go to the park..”
    It literally means “we planned on going to the park.” The verb planejar (”to plan” ) doesn’t require a preposition after it. It can be followed by a verb or a noun, or even an adjective.

    2- Saindo de casa, começou a chover… que sorte.

    Then comes the phrase - “Leaving home, it started to rain… just my luck..”
    In Portuguese, the verb “rain” never has a subject. In this case, the expression que sorte (”just my luck” ) is sarcastic, meaning bad luck. But it can also be used with a non-sarcastic connotation, when something was really an event of good luck. Depending on the context, it can also mean “just your luck” or anybody’s luck - hers, his, theirs, ours, etc.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Luiza’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Se quiserem vir aqui comer um lanche, me avisem!

    Her neighbor, Gabriela, uses an expression meaning - “If you guys want, come over and have some snacks. Just let me know!”
    Gabriela is extending a warm invitation to Luiza and Eduardo.

    2- Dane-se a chuva! Se joga!

    Her high school friend, Helena, uses an expression meaning - “To hell with the rain! You go, girl!”
    Helena thinks they should brave the rain anyway.

    3- Eu estou adorando a chuva.

    Her nephew, André, uses an expression meaning - “I’m actually loving this rain.”
    Is André being nasty or is he just commenting on his preference of the weather?

    4- Que pena! Espero que consiga se divertir de outro jeito.

    Her supervisor, Paulo, uses an expression meaning - “What a pity! I hope you manage to have fun in other ways.”
    A nice comment to express sympathy and a well-wish.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • planejar: “to plan”
  • parque: “park”
  • sorte: “luck”
  • chuva: “rain”
  • lanche: “snack”
  • divertir: “to have fun”
  • jeito: “way”
  • How would you comment in Portuguese when a friend is disappointed?

    Not all posts need to be about a negative feeling, though!

    11. Talking about Your Relationship Status in Brazilian Portuguese

    Don’t just change your relationship status in Settings, talk about it!

    Eduardo changes his status to “In a relationship”, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eduardo’s post.

    Nunca fui tão feliz na vida. Te amo, Luiza.
    “I’ve never been so happy. I love you, Luiza.”

    1- Nunca fui tão feliz na vida.

    First is an expression meaning “I’ve never been so happy..”
    It’s extremely common to omit the subject eu (”I” ) in Portuguese. The subject is implied, though, and is treated like explicit ones - nunca fui could be eu nunca fui (”I’ve never been” ). Both are correct. tão feliz na vida means “so happy in my life.”

    2- Te amo, Luiza.

    Then comes the phrase - “I love you, Luiza..”
    “I love you.” Again, this is a case where the subject is implicit.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eduardo’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Também te amo, meu amor!

    His girlfriend, Luiza, uses an expression meaning - “I love you too, honey!”
    A sweet, loving comment.

    2- Finalmente! Já ia puxar a sua orelha.

    His girlfriend’s high school friend, Helena, uses an expression meaning - “Finally! I was about to chide you.”
    Helena has clearly been waiting for this to happen, and she’s happy about the relationship.

    3- A patroa vai ficar feliz!

    His college friend, Lucas, uses an expression meaning - “The missus will be pleased!”
    Lucas’ comment is fun and not serious. He’s joking a bit with the couple.

    4- Que lindos! Mas não é nenhuma novidade, né?

    His neighbor, Gabriela, uses an expression meaning - “How lovely! But it’s nothing new, right? ”
    Gabriela expresses her feelings of appreciation and also indicates that it didn’t come as a surprise.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • nunca: “never”
  • vida: “life”
  • amar: “to love”
  • orelha: “ear”
  • patroa: “missus; boss (female)”
  • novidade: “new, novelty”
  • amor: “love”
  • What would you say in Portuguese when a friend changes their relationship status?

    Being in a good relationship with someone special is good news - don’t be shy to spread it!

    12. Post about Getting Married in Brazilian Portuguese

    Wow, so things got serious, and you’re getting married. Congratulations! Or, your friend is getting married, so talk about this in Portuguese.

    Luiza is getting married today, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Luiza’s post.

    É hoje o grande dia! Estou muito feliz e ansiosa!
    “Today’s the big day! I’m very happy and very nervous!”

    1- É hoje o grande dia!

    First is an expression meaning “Today is the big day!.”
    It’s common to put adjectives before nouns, especially when emphasizing and/or giving a more poetic tone to the phrase. The same goes for putting the verb before the noun.

    2- Estou muito feliz e ansiosa!

    Then comes the phrase - “I’m very happy and nervous! .”
    The first part means “I’m very happy.” Ansiosa literally means “anxious,” and it’s used just like in English. But informally, it’s also used as “excited, nervous, eager, looking forward to, can’t wait.” So Luiza is happy and nervous; she can’t wait.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Luiza’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Não vejo a hora da cerimônia. Parabéns!

    Her neighbor, Gabriela, uses an expression meaning - “I’m looking forward to the ceremony. Congratulations!”
    A congratulatory, warmhearted comment.

    2- Você tem certeza que não vai chover?

    Her nephew, André, uses an expression meaning - “Are you sure it won’t rain?”
    André is clearly the worripot in the family.

    3- Você vai ser uma noiva linda, tenho certeza!

    Her husband’s high school friend, Lígia, uses an expression meaning - “You’ll be a beautiful bride, I’m sure!”
    Lígia compliments Luiza.

    4- Qual o horário da cerimônia mesmo?

    Her college friend, Lucas, uses an expression meaning - “What time is the ceremony taking place again?”
    Lucas is asking a question about the ceremony - one way to stay part of the conversation and get information.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • hoje: “today”
  • feliz: “happy”
  • ansioso: “anxious, nervous, excited”
  • cerimônia: “ceremony”
  • parabéns: “congratulations”
  • noiva: “bride”
  • grande: “big, great”
  • How would you respond in Portuguese to a friend’s post about getting married?

    For the next topic, fast forward about a year into the future after the marriage…

    13. Announcing Big News in Brazilian Portuguese

    Wow, huge stuff is happening in your life! Announce it in Portuguese.

    Eduardo finds out he and his wife are going to have a baby, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eduardo’s post.

    A família está crescendo. Nosso primeiro filho está a caminho!
    “Our family is getting bigger. Our first child is on the way!”

    1- A família está crescendo.

    First is an expression meaning “Our family is getting bigger..”
    It’s very common to refer to your family as “the family” in these situations. For instance, when saying to a friend, a família vai vir amanhã (”the family will come tomorrow” ), it means minha família (”my family” ). Crescendo can mean “getting bigger” or “growing”.

    2- Nosso primeiro filho está a caminho!

    Then comes the phrase - “Our first child is on the way!.”
    In Portuguese, there is no such thing as a gender-neutral class of nouns (in grammar, not meaning), such as “child” in English. When you want to generalize, you use the masculine form. So, whenever you don’t know the gender of a baby or child, you say filho (”son” ). Filha (”daughter” ) is only used when it’s certain or believed that the baby or kid is in fact a girl. Está a caminho means “on the way, on its way”.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eduardo’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Que alegria! Um filho é uma bênção. Parabéns, futuro papai.

    His supervisor, Paulo, uses an expression meaning - “What a joy! A child is a blessing. Congratulations, soon-to-be daddy.”
    Use this expression to be old fashioned.

    2- Que maravilha! Vocês já escolheram o nome?

    His high school friend, Lígia, uses an expression meaning - “How wonderful! Have you chosen the name already?”
    Lígia is happy about this announcement and curious about the baby’s name.

    3- Algo me diz que é uma menina!

    His wife, Luiza, uses an expression meaning - “Something tells me it’s a girl!”
    Luiza must be sensing something…

    4- Não acredito que você vai ser pai! Parabéns, meu chapa.

    His college friend, Lucas, uses an expression meaning - “I can’t believe you’re going to be a father! Congratulations, buddy.”
    Lucas is happy for his friend, and also a bit unbelieving.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • família: “family”
  • filho: “son, child”
  • alegria: “joy”
  • bênção: “blessing”
  • maravilha: “wonder; marvel”
  • pai, papai: “dad, daddy”
  • acreditar: “to believe”
  • Which phrase would you choose when a friend announces their pregnancy on social media?

    So, talking about a pregnancy will get you a lot of traction on social media. But wait till you see the responses to babies!

    14. Posting Brazilian Portuguese Comments about Your Baby

    Your bundle of joy is here, and you cannot keep quiet about it! Share your thoughts in Portuguese.

    Luiza plays with her baby, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Luiza’s post.

    Estou completamente apaixonada por esta pessoinha!
    “I’m head over heels in love with this little person!”

    1- Completamente apaixonada por

    First is an expression meaning “head over heels in love with.”
    Completamente apaixonada(o) is an emphatic way of saying you’re in love, like head over heels in love. Completamente is “completely”.

    2- esta pessoinha

    Then comes the phrase - “this little person.”
    It’s a very tender expression showing affection to a child or baby. In other contexts, however, it can be very pejorative, like calling someone small in attitude, a low person.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Luiza’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Posso roubar esta coisinha linda?

    Her high school friend, Helena, uses an expression meaning - “Can I steal this beautiful little thing?”
    This is Helena’s way of saying that the baby is both beautiful and adorable.

    2- Sou suspeito para falar, mas ela é linda mesmo.

    Her husband, Eduardo, uses an expression meaning - “I’m biased, but she really is beautiful.”
    Eduardo is also expressing his admiration for his daughter’s looks.

    3- Quanta fofura! Dá vontade de morder.

    Her neighbor, Gabriela, uses an expression meaning - “So much cuteness! She makes me want to bite her.”
    Gabriela is overcome with strong emotions of appreciation for the little one.

    4- Ela é muito linda. Venha ao escritório com ela qualquer dia destes.

    Her supervisor, Paulo, uses an expression meaning - “She is very beautiful. Bring her to the office one of these days.”
    Paolo is a pleasant, engaging supervisor who clearly takes interest in his colleagues’ personal lives.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • coisinha: “little thing”
  • fofura: “cuteness, fluffiness”
  • roubar: “to steal”
  • morder: “to bite”
  • escritório: “office”
  • suspeito: “suspect”
  • poder: “can”
  • vir: “to come”
  • If your friend is the mother or father, which phrase would you use on social media?

    Congratulations, you know the basics of chatting about a baby in Portuguese! But we’re not done with families yet…

    15. Brazilian Portuguese Comments about a Family Reunion

    Family reunions - some you love, some you hate. Share about it on your feed.

    Eduardo goes to a family gathering, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eduardo’s post.

    Um almoço em família é sempre muito bom!
    “Family lunch is always a very good thing!”

    1- almoço em família

    First is an expression meaning “family lunch.”
    “Lunch”, almoço, in Brazil, is usually a big event. For most families, it’s the most important meal, and generally the biggest one. So, family lunches are a big thing.

    2- é sempre muito bom

    Then comes the phrase - “is always a very good thing.”
    Sempre muito bom can be used in a lot of situations and subjects. Here, it’s the family lunch.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eduardo’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Que fique claro: eles me forçaram a sair na foto.

    His nephew, André, uses an expression meaning - “To make it clear: they forced me to be in this photo.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling cynical.

    2- Estava tudo tão bom! Pena que eu comi demais…

    His wife, Luiza, uses an expression meaning - “Everything was so good! Too bad I ate too much…”
    Luiza is expressing admiration for the tasty food, admitting that it was so good she overindulged.

    3- Que bom ter uma família grande e unida. Abraços.

    His supervisor, Paulo, uses an expression meaning - “How nice to have a big and united family. Hugs.”
    Perhaps a bit unimaginative and old-fashioned, this is nevertheless a nice comment.

    4- Foi por isso que você me deu bolo, então!

    His college friend, Lucas, uses an expression meaning - “That’s why you blew me off then!”
    Lucas understands now why they he and Eduardo were not able to get together.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • almoço: “lunch”
  • claro: “clear”
  • forçar: “to force”
  • grande: “big”
  • unido: “united”
  • dar um bolo: “to blow someone off”
  • ficar claro: “to make it clear”
  • tudo: “all, everything”
  • Which phrase is your favorite to comment on a friend’s photo about a family reunion?

    16. Post about Your Travel Plans in Brazilian Portuguese

    So, the family is going on holiday. Do you post and leave comments in Portuguese about being at the airport, waiting for a flight?

    Luiza waits at the airport for her flight, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Luiza’s post.

    O voo atrasou… aeroportos são tão chatos! Alguém online?
    “The flight was delayed… airports are so boring! Is anyone online?”

    1- O voo atrasou…

    First is an expression meaning “The flight was delayed….”
    Voo (”flight” ) was recently changed according to the Portuguese New Reform, which changed the rules of orthography to unite Portuguese-speaking countries. You may still see the spelling vôo, with a circumflex, but it’s out-dated.

    2- Aeroportos são tão chatos! Alguém online?

    Then comes the phrase - “Airports are so boring! Is anyone online?.”
    Chato can mean a lot of things: “dull, boring, annoying.” Literally, the word means “flat.” In this case, it’s a mix of boring and dull. So, aeroportos (”airports” ) are very dull and boring. Alguém online? means “is anyone online?”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Luiza’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Eu avisei para você baixar aquele jogo!

    Her husband, Eduardo, uses an expression meaning - “I told you to download that game!”
    Eduardo is making conversation with his wife.

    2- Se quiser conversar, estou aqui, querida!

    Her neighbor, Gabriela, uses an expression meaning - “If you want to chat, I’m here, darling!”
    Gabriela is being a good friend, offering to chat with Luiza to alleviate her boredom.

    3- Chato é não estar num aeroporto neste momento.

    Her nephew, André, uses an expression meaning - “Boring is not being in an airport at this moment.”
    André’s comment points out that Luiza is, after all, on her way to an exotic destination…

    4- Saia do celular e vá ler um livro!

    Her high school friend, Helena, uses an expression meaning - “Turn off your cell phone and go read a book!”
    Helena offers advice with this comment.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • voo: “flight”
  • jogo: “game”
  • aeroporto: “airport”
  • chato: “boring, dull, annoying, flat”
  • celular: “cell phone”
  • baixar: “to download”
  • livro: “book”
  • atrasar: “to delay”
  • Choose and memorize your best airport phrase in Portuguese!

    Hopefully the rest of the trip is better!

    17. Posting about an Interesting Find in Brazilian Portuguese

    So maybe you’re strolling around at your local market, and find something interesting. Here are some handy Portuguese phrases.

    Eduardo finds an unusual item at a local market, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eduardo’s post.

    Na feirinha, procurando óculos escuros, encontrei uma escultura igual à do meu falecido avô! Inacreditável!
    “At the fair, while looking for sunglasses, I found a sculpture that looks the same as my late grandfather’s! Unbelievable!”

    1- Na feirinha, procurando óculos escuros.

    First is an expression meaning “At the fair, while looking for sunglasses..”
    In Portuguese sometimes the diminutive is used for an unknown reason. In this case, it can mean “a small fair,” but it’s also used to indicate big fairs. It can be used in an affectionate way, but not necessarily. Sometimes, the use of a verb in the gerund form is good enough to replace “while doing something.” Procurando óculos de sol in this phrase means “while looking for sunglasses,” even though it doesn’t include enquanto (”while” ).

    2- Encontrei uma escultura igual à do meu falecido avô! Inacreditável!

    Then comes the phrase - “I found a sculpture that looks the same as my late grandfather’s! Unbelievable!”
    Sometimes people put adjectives in front of nouns to give the sentence a more poetic intonation. Falecido (”late, deceased” ) very commonly appears before the person who’s dead. But it’s not a rule, as it can come afterwards as well. Encontrei uma escultura igual à do meu falecido avô means “I found a sculpture that looks the same as my late grandfather’s.” Inacreditável! is used exactly like its English equivalent, “unbelievable!”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eduardo’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Estas feirinhas são incríveis! Nunca se sabe o que vai encontrar.

    His high school friend, Lígia, uses an expression meaning - “These fairs are amazing! You never know what you’ll find.”
    This is a comment of appreciation, and just to make talk.

    2- É no máximo parecida.

    His nephew, André, uses an expression meaning - “It’s similar at best.”
    Clearly, André is unimpressed with the fair.

    3- Parece coisa de filme!

    His wife, Luiza, uses an expression meaning - “It seems like something out of a movie!”
    Luiza is very amazed at the sights.

    4- Uau!

    His college friend, Lucas, uses an expression meaning - “Wow!”
    Lucas seems to feel rather astonished.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • óculos: “glasses”
  • escuro: “dark”
  • óculos escuros: “sunglasses”
  • escultura: “sculpture”
  • falecido: “deceased, late”
  • filme: “movie”
  • parecido: “similar”
  • avô: “grandfather”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s interesting find?

    Perhaps you will even learn the identity of your find! Or perhaps you’re on holiday, and visiting interesting places…

    18. Post about a Sightseeing Trip in Brazilian Portuguese

    Let your friends know what you’re up to in Portuguese, especially when visiting a remarkable place! Don’t forget the photo.

    Luiza visits a famous landmark, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Luiza’s post.

    Realizando o sonho de conhecer o Pelourinho!
    “Fulfilling my dream of going to the Pelourinho!”

    1- Realizando o sonho de conhecer

    First is an expression meaning “Fulfilling the dream of going to.”
    In Portuguese, when you first go someplace new, you say conhecer. That means “to know.” Estou conhecendo o Brasil - “I’m getting to know Brazil.” Não conheço o Rio de Janeiro - “I’ve never been to Rio de Janeiro.” So, the phrase means “fulfilling the dream of going to / getting to know”.

    2- o Pelourinho

    Then comes the phrase - “the Pelourinho.”
    Although Pelourinho means, literally, “pillory,” you don’t translate it as such in this case. It’s the name of a historical neighborhood in Salvador, the capital of Bahia, a Brazilian northeastern state. It is where a pillory used to be, and lots of slaves were punished there during colonial times. It’s a famous sight in Brazil.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Luiza’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Que legal, é um dos meus pontos turísticos favoritos!

    Her husband’s high school friend, Lígia, uses an expression meaning - “How cool; it’s one of my favorite sights!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling optimistic.

    2- Que viagem de trabalho chata! Só que não…

    Her high school friend, Helena, uses an expression meaning - “How annoying your work trip! Not…”
    Use this expression to be funny.

    3- E o maridão, foi junto?

    Her college friend, Lucas, uses an expression meaning - “What about your hubby? Did he come with you?”
    Lucas is curious about Eduardo’s whereabouts.

    4- Te encontro em alguns dias, minha linda! Estou com saudade.

    Her husband, Eduardo, uses an expression meaning - “I’ll meet you in a few days, my pretty! I miss you.”
    And hubby misses his wife.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • sonho: “dream”
  • só que não: “Not!” (as a joke, pun)
  • encontrar: “to meet”
  • junto: “along, together”
  • ponto turístico: “tourist attraction”
  • realizar: “to fulfill, to accomplish, to perform”
  • alguns: “some”
  • viagem: “trip”
  • Which phrase would you prefer when a friend posts about a famous landmark?

    Share your special places with the world. Or simply post about your relaxing experiences.

    19. Post about Relaxing Somewhere in Brazilian Portuguese

    So you’re doing nothing yet you enjoy that too? Tell your social media friends about it in Portuguese!

    Eduardo relaxes at a beautiful place, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eduardo’s post.

    Finalmente cheguei! Agora é só curtir.
    “I finally arrived! I’m just going to enjoy it now.”

    1- Finalmente cheguei! Agora é só

    First is an expression meaning “I finally arrived! Now it’s just.”
    The first part means “I finally arrived.” The subject is implicit. The second part, agora é só, is a very common informal expression. It’s similar to “now all you have to do is,” but short and simplified. You can’t say that about yourself, implying that there’s something you’re about to do, or about someone else, like on a guide. Example: Agora é só ligar o aparelho (”now you just have to turn the device on” ); Agora é só música boa (”now there’s just going to be good music” ). And so on.

    2- curtir

    Then comes the phrase - “enjoy, like, dig.”
    Curtir is a very popular slang that means “to like and / or to enjoy.” For instance, the like button on Facebook is the curtir button in Portuguese. You can use it for anything: Eu curto essa banda (”I like this band” ); Não curti o presente (”I didn’t dig the present” ).

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eduardo’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Que bom que está aproveitando. A Bahia é linda.

    His supervisor, Paulo, uses an expression meaning - “I’m glad you’re enjoying it. Bahia is beautiful.”
    A common expression, this is still a considerate and friendly thing to say.

    2- Não quero voltar pra casa!

    His wife, Luiza, uses an expression meaning - “I don’t want to go home!”
    Luiza is regretful that the trip will have to end at some point.

    3- Vocês vão ficar quanto tempo?

    His high school friend, Lígia, uses an expression meaning - “How long will you stay?”
    A question to keep the conversation going.

    4- Que trabalhão vocês estão tendo…

    His nephew, André, uses an expression meaning - “That’s a lot of work for you guys…”

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • curtir: “to like, to dig, to enjoy”
  • aproveitar: “to enjoy”
  • voltar: “to come back”
  • chegar: “to arrive”
  • casa: “home, house”
  • pra: “to, for”
  • que bom: “I’m glad, how good”
  • querer: “to want”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s feed?

    The break was great, but now it’s time to return home.

    20. What to Say in Brazilian Portuguese When You’re Home Again

    And you’re back! What will you share with friends and followers?

    Luiza returns home after the vacation, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Luiza’s post.

    Chegando em casa nesse momento… posso voltar no tempo?
    “Arriving home right now… can I go back in time?”

    1- Chegando em casa nesse momento…

    First is an expression meaning “Arriving home right now.”
    Chegando means “arriving.” Em casa means “at home.” But the word casa can also mean “house,” the solid building itself. You have to understand the context. Nesse momento means “right now”.

    2- posso voltar no tempo?

    Then comes the phrase - “can I go back in time?.”
    A grammar recap: the subject eu (”I” ) is implicit; posso (”can” ) is first person singular present indicative, which confirms it. Sometimes, especially on the internet, people may say pode voltar as slang - pode is first or third person singular. Technically, this is wrong, but it’s slang among youngsters.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Luiza’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Depressão pós-viagem? Sei como é!

    Her high school friend, Helena, uses an expression meaning - “Post-trip depression? Been there!”
    Helena expresses her understanding of Luiza’s feelings.

    2- Bem-vinda de volta!

    Her supervisor, Paulo, uses an expression meaning - “Welcome back!”
    An old-fashioned comment, but still good.

    3- O prédio ficou vazio sem vocês.

    Her neighbor, Gabriela, uses an expression meaning - “The building was so empty without you guys.”
    A lovely, warm-hearted welcome from Gabriela.

    4- A viagem foi boa, mas estou feliz em ter voltado.

    Her husband, Eduardo, uses an expression meaning - “The trip was good, but I’m happy to be back.”
    Eduardo clearly enjoyed the trip, but home is best for him.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • chegar: “to arrive”
  • momento: “moment”
  • depressão: “depression”
  • prédio: “building”
  • vazio: “empty”
  • tempo: “time”
  • mas: “but”
  • bom: “good, nice”
  • How would you welcome a friend back from a trip?

    What do you post on social media during a special event, such as the Carnaval parade in Portugese?

    21. It’s Time to Celebrate in Brazilian Portuguese

    It’s an historic day and you wish to post something about it on social media. What would you say?

    Eduardo watches the Carnaval parade, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eduardo’s post.

    Ganhei um ingresso VIP! Alguém por aqui no sambódromo?
    “I won a VIP ticket! Anyone here in the Sambadrome?”

    1- Ganhei um ingresso VIP!

    First is an expression meaning “I won a VIP ticket!.”
    In Brazil, the VIP concept and the abbreviation are the same as in English. The difference is that it isn’t pronounced as three independent letters. Instead, you say it as a whole word: approximately, “veeh-pee.” The whole phrase means “I won a VIP ticket.”

    2- Alguém por aqui no sambódromo?

    Then comes the phrase - “Anyone here in the Sambadrome?.”
    Alguém por aqui is a less formal simplification of tem alguém por aqui? (”is there, is someone” ). It’s common to suppress tem (”is there” ). Por aqui means “around, close-by.” Sambódromo is the sambadrome, where the Carnaval parade takes place. Just like cars have autodromes, samba has the sambadrome.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eduardo’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Como você não me levou?

    His college friend, Lucas, uses an expression meaning - “How could you not take me?”
    Lucas is being humorous, expressing his disappointment in a joking way.

    2- Ingresso VIP sem acompanhante, fala sério.

    His wife, Luiza, uses an expression meaning - “VIP ticket without a plus one, seriously?”
    Luiza is more to the point about her exclusion from the event.

    3- Cuidado para não ficar surdo.

    His nephew, André, uses an expression meaning - “Be careful not to go deaf.”
    André gives wry and perhaps even apt advice.

    4- Eu e a Luiza estamos a caminho do bloco de rua, seu esnobe!

    His wife’s high school friend, Helena, uses an expression meaning - “Luiza and I are on the way to the street carnaval block, you snob!”
    Use this expression to be funny.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • ganhar: “to win”
  • levar: “to take, to lead, to bring”
  • acompanhante: “companion, company, plus one”
  • fala sério: “seriously?, for real?”
  • cuidado: “careful, watch out, caution”
  • esnobe: “snob”
  • bloco de rua: “street carnaval block”
  • surdo: “deaf”
  • If a friend posted something about a holiday, which phrase would you use?

    But Carnaval Parade days are not the only special ones to remember!

    22. Posting about a Birthday on Social Media in Brazilian Portuguese

    Your friend or you are celebrating your birthday in an unexpected way. Be sure to share this on social media!

    Luiza goes to her birthday party, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Luiza’s post.

    Os melhores amigos são aqueles que te dão uma festa surpresa! Obrigada, gente!
    “The best friends are those who throw you a surprise party! Thank you, guys!”

    1- Os melhores amigos são aqueles que te dão uma festa surpresa!

    First is an expression meaning “The best friends are those who throw you a surprise party!.”
    The phrase os melhores amigos são aqueles que literally means “the best friends are those who/that”. In Portuguese, the concept of throwing a party is expressed with the verb dar, “to give.” Even if you throw a party for yourself, you’re giving it. It expresses how Brazilians understand and enjoy parties.

    2- Obrigada, gente!

    Then comes the phrase - “Thank you, guys!.”
    Remember that obrigada is for females, while obrigado is for males. Gente, originally, means “people.” But it’s also used just like pessoal, galera: it means “guys, folks, gang,” etc. Que gente legal! (”Such nice people” ); Gente, eu tenho uma ideia. (”Guys, I have an idea.” ).

    COMMENTS

    In response, Luiza’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Fizemos com muito carinho!

    Her neighbor, Gabriela, uses an expression meaning - “We did it with love!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling warmhearted.

    2- Você precisava ver a sua cara!

    Her high school friend, Helena, uses an expression meaning - “You should’ve seen your face!”
    Helena is joking with Luiza about her facial expression.

    3- Quem fez o bolo? Estava bom demais!

    Her college friend, Lucas, uses an expression meaning - “Who made the cake? It was really good!”
    Lucas is appreciative of the birthday cake.

    4- Você merece, parabéns!

    Her husband’s high school friend, Lígia, uses an expression meaning - “You deserve it, congratulations!”
    Lígia makes a sweet congratulatory remark.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • amigo: “friend”
  • aquele: “those”
  • surpresa: “surprise”
  • bolo: “cake”
  • bom demais: “really good, too good”
  • merecer: “to deserve”
  • cara: “face”
  • If a friend posted something about birthday greetings, which phrase would you use?

    23. Talking about New Year on Social Media in Brazilian Portuguese

    Impress your friend with your Portuguese New Year’s wishes this year. Learn the phrases easily!

    Eduardo celebrates the New Year, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eduardo’s post.

    Adeus ano velho, feliz Ano-Novo! Pode vir quente que eu estou fervendo!
    “Goodbye, old year; happy new year! You can come hotly, because I’m boiling!”

    1- Adeus ano velho, feliz Ano-Novo!

    First is an expression meaning “Goodbye, old year; happy new year! .”
    This is an expression derived from a Brazilian song from the 50s. It’s sung at New Year’s Eve parties, welcoming the new year. It’s been the new year hymn in Brazil for a long time.

    2- Pode vir quente que eu estou fervendo!

    Then comes the phrase - “You can come hotly, because I’m boiling!.”
    It’s an expression derived from another song with the same name. It means “I can take it,” “you can come, I’m stronger,” “if you’re mad, I’m madder,” “I’m ready,” and so on.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eduardo’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Fervendo ou derretendo neste calor?

    His nephew, André, uses an expression meaning - “Boiling or melting in this heat?”

    2- Este ano promete!

    His high school friend, Lígia, uses an expression meaning - “This year is promising!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling optimistic about the New Year.

    3- Vamos manter nossas resoluções!

    His wife, Luiza, uses an expression meaning - “Let’s stick to our resolutions!”
    Luiza is encouraging everyone to stick to their resolutions.

    4- O Réveillon parece ter sido ótimo!

    His neighbor, Gabriela, uses an expression meaning - “The New Year’s Eve party seems to have been great!”
    Gabriela comments on the party.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • adeus: “goodbye”
  • velho: “old”
  • ferver: “to boil”
  • quente: “hot”
  • derreter: “to melt”
  • prometer: “to promise”
  • Réveillon: “New Year’s Eve”
  • calor: “heat”
  • Which is your favorite phrase to post on social media during New Year?

    But before New Year’s Day comes another important day…

    24. What to Post on Christmas Day in Brazilian Portuguese

    What will you say in Portuguese about Christmas?

    Luiza celebrates Christmas with her family, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Luiza’s post.

    Hoje, ceia com a minha família. Amanhã, almoço com os sogros. Feliz Natal a todos!
    “Today, supper with my family. Tomorrow, lunch with the in-laws. Merry Christmas to all!”

    1- Hoje, ceia com a minha família.

    First is an expression meaning “Today, supper with my family..”
    In Brazil, Christmas is celebrated more often, and more importantly, on ChrIstmas Eve. People stay awake and eat late, thus supper. When the clock turns to midnight, they all celebrate and exchange presents.

    2- Amanhã, almoço com os sogros. Feliz Natal a todos!

    Then comes the phrase - “Tomorrow, lunch with the in-laws. Merry Christmas to all!.”
    On the 25th of December, families usually gather for lunch, typically eating what’s left of supper. There’s usually a lot of food, as Brazilian celebratory meals are huge. It can also last for days after Christmas! The last part means “Merry Christmas to all!”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Luiza’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Almoço com meus avós? Você tá de castigo?

    Her nephew, André, uses an expression meaning - “Lunch with my grandparents? Are you grounded?”
    André has a very dry sense of humor.

    2- A ceia estava uma delícia! Espero que sobre espaço para o almoço!

    Her husband, Eduardo, uses an expression meaning - “Supper was delicious! I hope there will be room for lunch!”
    Eduardo has clearly enjoyed supper.

    3- Você sempre vira uma criança no Natal!

    Her high school friend, Helena, uses an expression meaning - “You always turn into a kid on Christmas!”
    Helena partakes in the conversation with a good-natured tease.

    4- Vocês trocaram presentes? Feliz Natal pra você também!

    Her neighbor, Gabriela, uses an expression meaning - “Did you exchange gifts? Merry Christmas to you, too!”
    Gabriela offers a warmhearted well-wish and asks a question to show interest in the topic.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • hoje: “today”
  • ceia: “supper”
  • amanhã: “tomorrow”
  • sogros: “the in-laws”
  • natal: “Christmas”
  • de castigo: “grounded”
  • trocar: “to exchange”
  • delícia: “delicious thing”
  • If a friend posted something about Christmas greetings, which phrase would you use?

    So, the festive season is over! Yet, there will always be other days, besides a birthday, to wish someone well.

    25. Post about Your Anniversary in Brazilian Portuguese

    Some things deserve to be celebrated, like wedding anniversaries. Learn which Portuguese phrases are meaningful and best suited for this purpose!

    Eduardo celebrates his wedding anniversary with his wife, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eduardo’s post.

    Um ano de casado. Que venham muitos mais! Te amo, Luiza.
    “One year of marriage. Let there be many more! I love you, Luiza.”

    1- Um ano de casado.

    First is an expression meaning “One year of marriage..”
    Whenever you’re counting years of marriage, you don’t say casamento (”marriage” ), like in English. You’re counting the time you have as a married person; so, you should use casado, which means “married.”

    2- Que venham muitos mais! Te amo, Luiza.

    Then comes the phrase - “Let there be many more! I love you, Luiza..”
    This is a common expression used to express courage or satisfaction, similar to English. Think of it as a fixed expression, and not grammatically, as it may be confusing at this stage. Te amo, Luiza. means “I love you, Luiza.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eduardo’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Com você o tempo passa voando! Também te amo, lindo.

    His wife, Luiza, uses an expression meaning - “Time flies when I’m with you! I love you too, honey.”
    Luiza returns Eduardo’s heartfelt sentiments about their marriage.

    2- Parece que foi ontem que vocês casaram!

    His neighbor, Gabriela, uses an expression meaning - “It seems like yesterday that you got married!”
    Gabriela is amazed at how time flew.

    3- Cara, quem diria? Parabéns, irmão!

    His college friend, Lucas, uses an expression meaning - “Man, who would say? Congratulations, my brother!”
    Lucas is making fun of Eduardo in a friendly way.

    4- Vocês são um casal lindo! Muitas felicidades!

    His high school friend, Lígia, uses an expression meaning - “You guys are a beautiful couple! Best wishes!”
    Lígia expresses appreciation and gives a well wish.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • felicidades: “cheers, best wishes”
  • passar: “to go, to pass”
  • voar: “to fly”
  • ontem: “yesterday”
  • cara: “dude, man”
  • dizer: “to say”
  • irmão: “brother, bro”
  • casal: “a married couple, a couple”
  • If a friend posted something about Anniversary greetings, which phrase would you use?

    Conclusion

    Learning to speak a new language will always be easier once you know key phrases that everybody uses. These would include commonly used expressions for congratulations and best wishes, etc.

    Master these in fun ways with Learn Portuguese! We offer a variety of tools to individualize your learning experience, including using cell phone apps, audiobooks, iBooks and many more. Never wonder again what to say on social media!

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